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Will there be any damage to the computer monitor(LCD) if its screen is positioned horizontally?

Started by Andrea March 18, 2012
I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and that means the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed(or floor). Will such positioning do any damage to the monitor? 
On Mar 18, 8:22=A0am, Andrea <andreaostrovleta...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and that means=
the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed(or floor). Will suc= h positioning do any damage to the monitor? old, vacuum tube monitor, yes. 'crud' could fall to the face and cause incredible, permanent damage. NEVER place with the face down. Alway, sit upright, or vertical - with tube facing ceiling with the gun at bottom. new LCD screens, I cannot envision any mechanism that would 'hurt' them. My knowledge of LCD is limited to military, cockpit type high contrast displays...The two glass plates are held apart by physical separators, the fill is liquid, gravity will have a different direction, may change 'color' renditions, the transistors will be on the bottom, but insulated, so again, can't envision a mechanism that will 'hurt' it. Hopefully an employee of an monitor LCD firm will wade in here. There may be some short cut done in consumer versions that weakens an LCD, but doubt it. My vote, is NO PROBLEM.
Andrea wrote:
>I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and that means the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed(or floor). Will such positioning do any damage to the monitor?
So how do you do that? Float a few inches above the bed, or look from the bed to the floor? Only way I know that I have seen is monitor horizontally on the ceiling above the bed. Main risk is it falling down on you if badly mounted. The other thing is to read the manufacturers instructions for mounting it, if it says vertical only then that answers your question.
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 01:22:36 +1000, Andrea <andreaostrovletania@gmail.com>  
wrote:

> I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and that > means the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed(or floor). > Will such positioning do any damage to the monitor?
It may alter the heat flow and cause the monitor to overheat -- We have failed to address the fundamental truth that endless growth is impossible in a finite world.
On 18 Mar., 16:56, Robert Macy <robert.a.m...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Mar 18, 8:22=A0am, Andrea <andreaostrovleta...@gmail.com> wrote: > > > I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and that mea=
ns the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed(or floor). Will s= uch positioning do any damage to the monitor?
> > old, vacuum tube monitor, yes. 'crud' could fall to the face and cause > incredible, permanent damage. NEVER place with the face down. Alway, > sit upright, or vertical - =A0with tube facing ceiling with the gun at > bottom. > > new LCD screens, I cannot envision any mechanism that would 'hurt' > them. My knowledge of LCD is limited to military, cockpit type high > contrast displays...The two glass plates are held apart by physical > separators, the fill is liquid, gravity will have a different > direction, may change 'color' renditions, the transistors will be on > the bottom, but insulated, so again, can't envision a mechanism that > will 'hurt' it. > > Hopefully an employee of an monitor LCD firm will wade in here. There > may be some short cut done in consumer versions that weakens an LCD, > but doubt it. > > My vote, is NO PROBLEM.
you can get several monitors that have a stand where you can rotate the screen 90degrees, theres usually an option in the driver to rotate the image too so you can use it in portrait mode instead of the usual landscape -Lasse
On Sun, 18 Mar 2012 08:22:36 -0700 (PDT), Andrea
<andreaostrovletania@gmail.com> wrote:

>I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and that >means the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed >(or floor). Will such positioning do any damage to the monitor?
No, there should not be. There is a very slim chance the power supply inside would operate a bit hotter than normal, but not much else. Back in the days of "upright video games" (they actually still exist), the "CRT" type display had to be oriented a certain way, with respect to the Earth, or the video color settings would be messed up by the Earth's magnetic fields. This was a problem, largely because the display face was tipped back to a near horizontal plane in many games. So a game operator had to go to the field and readjust the color on certain machines or change their orientation to remove the problem. The latter usually being the easier choice. LCD displays do not suffer such problems.
On Sun, 18 Mar 2012 09:53:53 -0700 (PDT), "langwadt@fonz.dk"
<langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

>On 18 Mar., 16:56, Robert Macy <robert.a.m...@gmail.com> wrote: >> On Mar 18, 8:22&#2013266080;am, Andrea <andreaostrovleta...@gmail.com> wrote: >> >> > I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and > that means the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed >(or floor). Will such positioning do any damage to the monitor? >> >> old, vacuum tube monitor, yes. 'crud' could fall to the face and cause >> incredible, permanent damage. NEVER place with the face down. Alway, >> sit upright, or vertical - &#2013266080;with tube facing ceiling with the gun at >> bottom. >> >> new LCD screens, I cannot envision any mechanism that would 'hurt' >> them. My knowledge of LCD is limited to military, cockpit type high >> contrast displays...The two glass plates are held apart by physical >> separators, the fill is liquid, gravity will have a different >> direction, may change 'color' renditions, the transistors will be on >> the bottom, but insulated, so again, can't envision a mechanism that >> will 'hurt' it. >> >> Hopefully an employee of an monitor LCD firm will wade in here. There >> may be some short cut done in consumer versions that weakens an LCD, >> but doubt it. >> >> My vote, is NO PROBLEM. > >you can get several monitors that have a stand where you can rotate >the >screen 90degrees, theres usually an option in the driver to rotate >the >image too so you can use it in portrait mode instead of the usual >landscape > >-Lasse
You should probably learn to read a bit before making dumb posts in Usenet.
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 03:49:12 +1000, My Name Is Tzu How Do You Do  
<Tzu@hereforlongtime.org> wrote:

> On Sun, 18 Mar 2012 08:22:36 -0700 (PDT), Andrea > <andreaostrovletania@gmail.com> wrote: > >> I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and that >> means the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed >> (or floor). Will such positioning do any damage to the monitor? > > No, there should not be. There is a very slim chance the power supply > inside would operate a bit hotter than normal, but not much else. > > Back in the days of "upright video games" (they actually still exist), > the "CRT" type display had to be oriented a certain way, with respect to > the Earth, or the video color settings would be messed up by the Earth's > magnetic fields. This was a problem, largely because the display face > was tipped back to a near horizontal plane in many games. > > So a game operator had to go to the field and readjust the color on > certain machines or change their orientation to remove the problem. > The latter usually being the easier choice. > > LCD displays do not suffer such problems.
I'm sorry but they do. A friend of mine did the build for and technical support during 'Big Brother' in Australia. The last series used a floor made out of Samsung LCD screens - made as you would expect for use as standard TV's. They blew about 2 per day from overheating. Representatives from Korea came over and their show consumed ALL of the Asia Pacific stocks of that model. The guys from Korea confirmed the 'too hot' diagnosis (big deal - so had all the techs and every one else who smelt the plastic). The solution they came up with was to mount to 80mm fans over the cooling vents. That helped somewhat but the "dynamic" floor still got smaller and smaller as the show went on. It is very obvious in the last few episodes. -- We have failed to address the fundamental truth that endless growth is impossible in a finite world.
On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 11:54:31 +1000, "David Eather" <eather@tpg.com.au>
wrote:

>On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 03:49:12 +1000, My Name Is Tzu How Do You Do ><Tzu@hereforlongtime.org> wrote: > >> On Sun, 18 Mar 2012 08:22:36 -0700 (PDT), Andrea >> <andreaostrovletania@gmail.com> wrote: >> >>> I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and that >>> means the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed >>> (or floor). Will such positioning do any damage to the monitor? >> >> No, there should not be. There is a very slim chance the power supply >> inside would operate a bit hotter than normal, but not much else. >> >> Back in the days of "upright video games" (they actually still exist), >> the "CRT" type display had to be oriented a certain way, with respect to >> the Earth, or the video color settings would be messed up by the Earth's >> magnetic fields. This was a problem, largely because the display face >> was tipped back to a near horizontal plane in many games. >> >> So a game operator had to go to the field and readjust the color on >> certain machines or change their orientation to remove the problem. >> The latter usually being the easier choice. >> >> LCD displays do not suffer such problems. > >I'm sorry but they do.
You are a goddamned idiot. LCD displays do NOT have ANY problems associated with the Earth's magnetic field and their orientation with respect to it. Learn to read, fuckhead!
> >A friend of mine did the build for and technical support during 'Big >Brother' in Australia. The last series used a floor made out of Samsung >LCD screens - made as you would expect for use as standard TV's. They blew >about 2 per day from overheating.
Which has NOTHING to do with what I said LCDs had no problems with, IDIOT! That is a simple power supply overheat failure, which I ALSO identified and mentioned as one of the ONLY failure modes which needs to be worried about already. Do you EVER read ANYTHING?
> Representatives from Korea came over and >their show consumed ALL of the Asia Pacific stocks of that model. The guys > from Korea confirmed the 'too hot' diagnosis (big deal - so had all the >techs and every one else who smelt the plastic). The solution they came up >with was to mount to 80mm fans over the cooling vents. That helped >somewhat but the "dynamic" floor still got smaller and smaller as the show >went on. It is very obvious in the last few episodes.
Goddamned munchausen freak.
On Mar 19, 6:54=A0pm, "David Eather" <eat...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
> On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 03:49:12 +1000, My Name Is Tzu How Do You Do > > > > > > <T...@hereforlongtime.org> wrote: > > On Sun, 18 Mar 2012 08:22:36 -0700 (PDT), Andrea > > <andreaostrovleta...@gmail.com> wrote: > > >> I sometimes like to use the computer while lying on my bed and that > >> means the computer monitor is positioned parallel to the bed > >> (or floor). Will such positioning do any damage to the monitor? > > > =A0 No, there should not be. =A0There is a very slim chance the power s=
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> > the "CRT" type display had to be oriented a certain way, with respect t=
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> > the Earth, or the video color settings would be messed up by the Earth'=
s
> > magnetic fields. =A0This was a problem, largely because the display fac=
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> > was tipped back to a near horizontal plane in many games. > > > =A0So a game operator had to go to the field and readjust the color on > > certain machines or change their orientation to remove the problem. > > The latter usually being the easier choice. > > > =A0 LCD displays do not suffer such problems. > > I'm sorry but they do. > > A friend of mine did the build for and technical support during 'Big > Brother' in Australia. The last series used a floor made out of Samsung > LCD screens - made as you would expect for use as standard TV's. They ble=
w
> about 2 per day from overheating. Representatives from Korea came over an=
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> their show consumed ALL of the Asia Pacific stocks of that model. The guy=
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> =A0from Korea confirmed the 'too hot' diagnosis (big deal - so had all th=
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> techs and every one else who smelt the plastic). The solution they came u=
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> with was to mount to 80mm fans over the cooling vents. That helped > somewhat but the "dynamic" floor still got smaller and smaller as the sho=
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> went on. It is very obvious in the last few episodes. > > -- > We have failed to address the fundamental truth that endless growth is > impossible in a finite world.
Fascinating anecdote. Did the LCD screens overheat? Or, was it the backlight? What's strange for me is that 'shooting a scene' is like the RAF during WWII, hours and hours of idle boredom followed by minutes of sheer terror.Seems hard to believe that the low duty cycle of shooting would heat them that much.