Forums

T568A/B timewaster

Started by Don Y March 2, 2012
Hi Michael,

On 3/4/2012 1:32 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

>>> I use a small toolbox that has all the connectors, plates, surface >>> mount boxes and the hand tools to do the work. I also have an assortment >>> of cables and hardware in the kit. The tools are: A 6in1 screwdriver, a >>> crimper for plugs, a pair of dykes, needle nose pliers, and wire >>> strippers. >> >> Oh. Currently, those are distributed in many different locations. >> E.g., the crimpers (not just for the various modular connectors, >> but, also, for coax, etc.) are in an oversized "toolkit" (one >> of those suitcase affairs you use for field service work); the >> wall plates and snap-in "modules" are in a set of large boxes >> (I have A LOT of them); the connector shells are stored in >> oversized pill bottles (think: vitamin bottles) sorted by >> size and wire type; cable is in pull boxes; etc. > > Sigh. I have a couple hundred empty pill bottles for bulk hardware. > Between my health issues and those of my parents I get about 15 more a > month.
Ouch! I keep the various empty vitamin/supplement bottles we use (no one has any Rx's) because they tend to be a nice size; larger than a "pill bottle" yet smaller than a shoebox. I have small (a bit larger than a shoebox) boxes that I use to organize groups of things. E.g., one full of 8P8C "bottles"; another full of 10Base2 terminations and plumbing fixtures; another full of mag stripe readers; etc. And, larger boxes (12x18x6) to bundle collections of larger items (VGA cables; DVI cables; 5V wall warts; 12V wall warts; extension cords; etc.). I also use these to store *tools* (though I label them atypically: "pounding", "fastening", "cutting", "shaping", "boring", etc.). One of these days I'll buy one of those "walls on wheels" tool carts to organize them better (but, then I will have to find a place to put *that*! :< )
>> It works well for me *here* -- because I can just walk around >> to wherever the items I need happen to be "stored". It would >> be better to have them grouped together -- but, then you end >> up with duplication (do I have another kit for telephony? >> And another for CATV? Another for wirewrap tools?) > > Yes, since the phone stuff fills another small toolbox. The hand > tools don't cost much, and I have plenty of spares. A pair of dykes, > needlenose and screwdriver cost me $2.25 new.
I try to keep small hand tools in a the "field service" toolkit. Things that I absolutely want to *know* where they will be hiding. E.g., no-niks, *small* side cutters, jewelers screwdrivers, torx set, etc. This also helps me ensure they get put back in the same place! (I have three other Kennedy toolboxes for hand tools that I consider "disposable"; figuring out where one of the tools destined for *these* boxes might be at any given time is usually a bit of a treasure hunt! "Where's my Engineer's hammer? What about the offset philips screwdrivers? etc.")
> CATV is all stored together in a steel office cabinet, with a small > kit in one of those zippered six pack pop carriers.
Oh, that's an idea! I've been rescuing those black canvas (not the plastic ones) cases that were used for things like portable ZIP drives (a bit smaller than a laptop case) and using them for various odds and ends. While this is visually appealing (in that all of the cases "match" and look nice lined up on a shelf), it is a royal PITA when I want to *find* something: "Now which of these has the wireless tablets in it?" I've started salvaging the upscale leather "business card holders" to tag each of these cases (more durable than just a paper "tag" dangling on a string)
> Wire wrap? I haven't done that in over 25 years, but I have several > thousand feet of WW wire and a hand tool in a drawer under my main > workbench. It gets rare use to repair circuit boards.
I have a couple of GD guns and an assortment of bits, hand tools, embroidery hook, etc. They "belong" together. But, the soft sided black canvas bags don't suit them well. I need to find a nice hard-sided case. I've a pair of custom machined needle nose pliers that a colleague gave me that are used to 30AWG strip kynar. *Much* nicer than no-niks (though considerably more vulnerable to abuse!)
> You didn't mention electrical, but most of that is on a service cart > and the wire is on reel carriers.
The roll ends of 10/12/14 AWG cable that I have are either piled in a box or (in the case of the 6-3SE) coiled up in a corner. Never know when you might need a length! (These are the exact sorts of things for which I would *love* to have a basement -- even a dark/dank one!)
>> My approach would be miserable if I ever had to *go* somewhere >> to provide this service (you *know* I would forget SOMETHING) > > Thats why I kit them for different jobs.
And you are doubtlessly REWARDED with requests for favors! :>
>>> Even though I never intended to, I end up helping freinds install or >>> repair existing network cables. All I have to do is put that toolbox in >>> the truck and leave. In fact, I will soon be removing an air >>> conditioned server rack and moving the Cisco 1924 closer to the >>> corporate grapics department& sales offices. I have convinced them to >>> go to all networked printers and to put four ports per office to allow >>> for two printers a computer and later, VOIP phones. >> >> I can vouch for the wisdom of networked printers. I put all of >> mine on the network (6 of them) -- with the exception of one little >> "photo printer" that I imagine would present problems with >> drivers, etc. (I run several different OS's and it is marketed >> only to the Windows crowd) > > Right now all but one computer is XP/7. One of the owners want to > trash all of them and use Macs. I told him that would be the end of > free tech support.
I think OS/X is much closer to "UNIX+X" than the old MacOS. But, it still takes a different mindset to support. And, its still "visually oriented".
Don Y wrote:
> > On 3/4/2012 1:32 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote: > > > > Sigh. I have a couple hundred empty pill bottles for bulk hardware. > > Between my health issues and those of my parents I get about 15 more a > > month. > > Ouch! I keep the various empty vitamin/supplement bottles we > use (no one has any Rx's) because they tend to be a nice size; > larger than a "pill bottle" yet smaller than a shoebox. > > I have small (a bit larger than a shoebox) boxes that I use > to organize groups of things. E.g., one full of 8P8C "bottles"; > another full of 10Base2 terminations and plumbing fixtures; > another full of mag stripe readers; etc. > > And, larger boxes (12x18x6) to bundle collections of larger > items (VGA cables; DVI cables; 5V wall warts; 12V wall warts; > extension cords; etc.). I also use these to store *tools* > (though I label them atypically: "pounding", "fastening", > "cutting", "shaping", "boring", etc.). One of these days > I'll buy one of those "walls on wheels" tool carts to organize > them better (but, then I will have to find a place to put > *that*! :< )
I built one from an old mainframe tape storage rack. A piece of leftover 1/2" plywood, four casters and some 1/4" pegboard made the frame. Then I bought the gray bins & rails from Harbor freight to cover that side. On the back side I put most of my old steel framed Acro Mills 50 drawer parts cabinets.
> > Yes, since the phone stuff fills another small toolbox. The hand > > tools don't cost much, and I have plenty of spares. A pair of dykes, > > needlenose and screwdriver cost me $2.25 new. > > I try to keep small hand tools in a the "field service" toolkit. > Things that I absolutely want to *know* where they will be hiding. > E.g., no-niks, *small* side cutters, jewelers screwdrivers, torx > set, etc. This also helps me ensure they get put back in the > same place! (I have three other Kennedy toolboxes for hand tools > that I consider "disposable"; figuring out where one of the tools > destined for *these* boxes might be at any given time is usually > a bit of a treasure hunt! "Where's my Engineer's hammer? What > about the offset philips screwdrivers? etc.") > > > CATV is all stored together in a steel office cabinet, with a small > > kit in one of those zippered six pack pop carriers. > > Oh, that's an idea! I've been rescuing those black canvas (not the > plastic ones) cases that were used for things like portable ZIP > drives (a bit smaller than a laptop case) and using them for various > odds and ends. While this is visually appealing (in that all of > the cases "match" and look nice lined up on a shelf), it is a > royal PITA when I want to *find* something: "Now which of these > has the wireless tablets in it?" I've started salvaging the > upscale leather "business card holders" to tag each of these > cases (more durable than just a paper "tag" dangling on a string)
Printed labels on the end of each toolbox and sitting in rows on shelves. In the order they are most used.
> > Wire wrap? I haven't done that in over 25 years, but I have several > > thousand feet of WW wire and a hand tool in a drawer under my main > > workbench. It gets rare use to repair circuit boards. > > I have a couple of GD guns and an assortment of bits, hand tools, > embroidery hook, etc. They "belong" together. But, the soft sided > black canvas bags don't suit them well. I need to find a nice > hard-sided case. I've a pair of custom machined needle nose pliers > that a colleague gave me that are used to 30AWG strip kynar. *Much* > nicer than no-niks (though considerably more vulnerable to abuse!) > > > You didn't mention electrical, but most of that is on a service cart > > and the wire is on reel carriers. > > The roll ends of 10/12/14 AWG cable that I have are either piled in > a box or (in the case of the 6-3SE) coiled up in a corner. Never > know when you might need a length! (These are the exact sorts of > things for which I would *love* to have a basement -- even a > dark/dank one!)
I have a 30' * 40' four bay garage. My shop is 18' * 28'. The small shop is 12' * 12' and there is an empty 12' * 24' cottage. :)
> >> My approach would be miserable if I ever had to *go* somewhere > >> to provide this service (you *know* I would forget SOMETHING) > > > > Thats why I kit them for different jobs. > > And you are doubtlessly REWARDED with requests for favors! :>
I have a 60 gal air compressor, and had a lot of used computer equipment donated for my 'Computers for Veterans' project, since they also owned a thrift store for several years. :)
> >> I can vouch for the wisdom of networked printers. I put all of > >> mine on the network (6 of them) -- with the exception of one little > >> "photo printer" that I imagine would present problems with > >> drivers, etc. (I run several different OS's and it is marketed > >> only to the Windows crowd) > > > > Right now all but one computer is XP/7. One of the owners want to > > trash all of them and use Macs. I told him that would be the end of > > free tech support. > > I think OS/X is much closer to "UNIX+X" than the old MacOS. > But, it still takes a different mindset to support. And, its > still "visually oriented".
It also means that it will take too much of the few hours a day that I feel well enough to work. -- You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
Hi Michael,

On 3/5/2012 6:11 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

>> One of these days >> I'll buy one of those "walls on wheels" tool carts to organize >> them better (but, then I will have to find a place to put >> *that*! :< ) > > I built one from an old mainframe tape storage rack. A piece of > leftover 1/2" plywood, four casters and some 1/4" pegboard made the
Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of different hammers)
> frame. Then I bought the gray bins& rails from Harbor freight to cover > that side. On the back side I put most of my old steel framed Acro > Mills 50 drawer parts cabinets.
I put the "part drawers" (mine hold 60 *little* drawers) on a portion of one of the garage walls. Unfortunately, the same wall has the door that enters the living area. Code requires it to be "self-closing". So, each time it slams, the part drawers nudge out just a little bit more. By the end of a week, I have to manually push them all back in. <frown> Didn't anticipate that problem.
>>> CATV is all stored together in a steel office cabinet, with a small >>> kit in one of those zippered six pack pop carriers. >> >> Oh, that's an idea! I've been rescuing those black canvas (not the >> plastic ones) cases that were used for things like portable ZIP >> drives (a bit smaller than a laptop case) and using them for various >> odds and ends. While this is visually appealing (in that all of >> the cases "match" and look nice lined up on a shelf), it is a >> royal PITA when I want to *find* something: "Now which of these >> has the wireless tablets in it?" I've started salvaging the >> upscale leather "business card holders" to tag each of these >> cases (more durable than just a paper "tag" dangling on a string) > > Printed labels on the end of each toolbox and sitting in rows on > shelves. In the order they are most used.
Won't work for my "cloth"/canvas bags.
>>> You didn't mention electrical, but most of that is on a service cart >>> and the wire is on reel carriers. >> >> The roll ends of 10/12/14 AWG cable that I have are either piled in >> a box or (in the case of the 6-3SE) coiled up in a corner. Never >> know when you might need a length! (These are the exact sorts of >> things for which I would *love* to have a basement -- even a >> dark/dank one!) > > I have a 30' * 40' four bay garage. My shop is 18' * 28'. The small > shop is 12' * 12' and there is an empty 12' * 24' cottage. :)
(sigh) I can dream... :> I have a friend who owns four or five homes on "his property". The ultimate hackers haven! He has set aside the garages in each for different types of activities. Auto repair here, machine shop over there, heavy machinery in yet another place, etc. I don't think I would be able to discipline myself to any sort of "reasonable" limits given those sorts of resources! :<
>> And you are doubtlessly REWARDED with requests for favors! :> > > I have a 60 gal air compressor, and had a lot of used computer > equipment donated for my 'Computers for Veterans' project, since they > also owned a thrift store for several years. :)
There are many non-profits across the country that will work with you on projects like that. Some insist on 501(c)3 status but many just want you to "be credible". There is no shortage of surplus computers! <frown>
Don Y wrote:
> > Michael A. Terrell wrote: > > Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* > "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). > I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of > different hammers)
This is over six feet tall and almost four feet wide.
> I put the "part drawers" (mine hold 60 *little* drawers) on a portion > of one of the garage walls. Unfortunately, the same wall has the door > that enters the living area. Code requires it to be "self-closing". > So, each time it slams, the part drawers nudge out just a little > bit more. By the end of a week, I have to manually push them all > back in. > > <frown> Didn't anticipate that problem.
Some brands of cabinets are worse than others. Some drop slightly when pushed all the way in. Most of these are over 40 years old, and were industrial grade. I started buying them while I was in high school. :) Get some soft sheets of vinyl that will roll up, and hang it over each row of cabinets. That should keep the drawers in place, and free of dust.
> > Printed labels on the end of each toolbox and sitting in rows on > > shelves. In the order they are most used. > > Won't work for my "cloth"/canvas bags.
A cloth label & fabric glue would.
> (sigh) I can dream... :> I have a friend who owns four or five > homes on "his property". The ultimate hackers haven! He has > set aside the garages in each for different types of activities. > Auto repair here, machine shop over there, heavy machinery in > yet another place, etc. I don't think I would be able to > discipline myself to any sort of "reasonable" limits given > those sorts of resources! :<
I am in the process of cleaning them all up. I was doing OK, till my dad sold his place and left a lot of stuff here.
> >> And you are doubtlessly REWARDED with requests for favors! :> > > > > I have a 60 gal air compressor, and had a lot of used computer > > equipment donated for my 'Computers for Veterans' project, since > > they also owned a thrift store for several years. :)
That should have read, '20 gal'. They moved to a new building with a pair of 60 gallon compressors.
> There are many non-profits across the country that will work with > you on projects like that. Some insist on 501(c)3 status but > many just want you to "be credible". There is no shortage of > surplus computers! <frown>
Around here, they are forcing them to go to 'recylers'. I lost my last decent source a couple months ago when the city told them that all unwanted electronics had to be recycled. of course, the companies on their approved list all insist that they get ALL computer items or they won't take the bad TVs. -- You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
Hi Michael,

On 3/5/2012 11:57 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

>> Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* >> "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). >> I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of >> different hammers) > > This is over six feet tall and almost four feet wide.
Yes, but how many hammers, chisels, saws, screw/nut-drivers, crowbars, etc. can I store in it's drawers? :> Currently, my "tool storage" (not counting the 3 kennedy boxes, what's in the cars, sitting on my desk or in the "field service kit") is a stack of 6x12x18 boxes 48 inches wide, 18 inches deep and 7 feet tall. (I used to work for a company that manufactured hand tools and had excellent employee benefits! :> )
>> I put the "part drawers" (mine hold 60 *little* drawers) on a portion >> of one of the garage walls. Unfortunately, the same wall has the door >> that enters the living area. Code requires it to be "self-closing". >> So, each time it slams, the part drawers nudge out just a little >> bit more. By the end of a week, I have to manually push them all >> back in. >> >> <frown> Didn't anticipate that problem. > > Some brands of cabinets are worse than others. Some drop slightly > when pushed all the way in. Most of these are over 40 years old, and > were industrial grade. I started buying them while I was in high > school. :)
That's how I got these. It was the standard "gift" for me at the time when folks couldn't figure out what I might "want". I have 14 of them (= 840 drawers) that have survived the numerous moves.
> Get some soft sheets of vinyl that will roll up, and hang it over > each row of cabinets. That should keep the drawers in place, and free > of dust.
On a related note, when *moving* (i.e., cross country) these things, wrap the entire cabinet in "saran (plastic) wrap" to keep the drawers in place (the cardboard "wrappers/boxes" that I'd diligently kept over the decades eventually got torn and tattered from being slid on and off the drawer assemblies so many times).
>>> Printed labels on the end of each toolbox and sitting in rows on >>> shelves. In the order they are most used. >> >> Won't work for my "cloth"/canvas bags. > > A cloth label& fabric glue would.
<shudder> Not fond of glue!
>> There are many non-profits across the country that will work with >> you on projects like that. Some insist on 501(c)3 status but >> many just want you to "be credible". There is no shortage of >> surplus computers!<frown> > > Around here, they are forcing them to go to 'recylers'. I lost my > last decent source a couple months ago when the city told them that all > unwanted electronics had to be recycled. of course, the companies on > their approved list all insist that they get ALL computer items or they > won't take the bad TVs.
TV's are treated like "ugly sisters". Here, you have to *pay* to get someone to take your TV (I realize that is true in places like Californica) just because there are so many of the damn things. There are shops in Mexico that will actually dismantle the TVs and harvest the electronics, etc. (though I suspect the heavy metals still end up finding their way into the ground!)
Don Y wrote:
> > Hi Michael, > > On 3/5/2012 11:57 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote: > > >> Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* > >> "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). > >> I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of > >> different hammers) > > > > This is over six feet tall and almost four feet wide. > > Yes, but how many hammers, chisels, saws, screw/nut-drivers, > crowbars, etc. can I store in it's drawers? :> Currently, > my "tool storage" (not counting the 3 kennedy boxes, what's > in the cars, sitting on my desk or in the "field service kit") > is a stack of 6x12x18 boxes 48 inches wide, 18 inches deep and > 7 feet tall. (I used to work for a company that manufactured > hand tools and had excellent employee benefits! :> )
that was built to store parts, and small tools. I use old file cabinets for some tools, and those large steel double door office cabinets for others. I also have a pair of 24" wide relay racks with locking doors, shelves and some 1/4" pegboard on walls.
> >> I put the "part drawers" (mine hold 60 *little* drawers) on a portion > >> of one of the garage walls. Unfortunately, the same wall has the door > >> that enters the living area. Code requires it to be "self-closing". > >> So, each time it slams, the part drawers nudge out just a little > >> bit more. By the end of a week, I have to manually push them all > >> back in. > >> > >> <frown> Didn't anticipate that problem. > > > > Some brands of cabinets are worse than others. Some drop slightly > > when pushed all the way in. Most of these are over 40 years old, and > > were industrial grade. I started buying them while I was in high > > school. :) > > That's how I got these. It was the standard "gift" for me at > the time when folks couldn't figure out what I might "want". > I have 14 of them (= 840 drawers) that have survived the numerous > moves.
I prefered to buy my own, so I always got the same kind.
> > Get some soft sheets of vinyl that will roll up, and hang it over > > each row of cabinets. That should keep the drawers in place, and free > > of dust. > > On a related note, when *moving* (i.e., cross country) these things, > wrap the entire cabinet in "saran (plastic) wrap" to keep the drawers > in place (the cardboard "wrappers/boxes" that I'd diligently kept > over the decades eventually got torn and tattered from being slid on > and off the drawer assemblies so many times).
I used pieces of carboard between the faces of pairs of cabinets and packing tape when I moved.
> >>> Printed labels on the end of each toolbox and sitting in rows on > >>> shelves. In the order they are most used. > >> > >> Won't work for my "cloth"/canvas bags. > > > > A cloth label& fabric glue would. > > <shudder> Not fond of glue!
Fabric glue is flexible, and holds fabric quite well. My mother was a seamstress and used it for some repairs, when stitches would show.
> >> There are many non-profits across the country that will work with > >> you on projects like that. Some insist on 501(c)3 status but > >> many just want you to "be credible". There is no shortage of > >> surplus computers!<frown> > > > > Around here, they are forcing them to go to 'recylers'. I lost my > > last decent source a couple months ago when the city told them that all > > unwanted electronics had to be recycled. of course, the companies on > > their approved list all insist that they get ALL computer items or they > > won't take the bad TVs. > > TV's are treated like "ugly sisters". Here, you have to *pay* > to get someone to take your TV (I realize that is true in places > like Californica) just because there are so many of the damn > things. > > There are shops in Mexico that will actually dismantle the TVs > and harvest the electronics, etc. (though I suspect the heavy > metals still end up finding their way into the ground!)
There is a Japanese patent on a machine that grinds up old circuit boards to recover the metals. If the boards are fiberglass, they use acid to remove the remaining metal, then rinse it and sell the shreaded fiberglass for reuse in things like Spas and other fiberglass products. I harvest some parts off old boards before sending them to a recycler. -- You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
On Fri, 2 Mar 2012 20:19:18 -0500, "Martin Riddle"
<martin_rid@verizon.net> wrote:

> >"Don Y" <this@isnotme.com> wrote in message=20 >news:jiroi1$g6q$1@speranza.aioe.org... >> Hi Michael, >> >> On 3/2/2012 3:03 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote: >> >>>> I've deployed (wired) ethernet (CAT5, not 6) throughout the >>>> house. I chose to follow the "B" wiring color conventions >>>> in 8P8C's. >>>> >>>> But, from time to time, I end up adding or replacing an >>>> "RJ45" and always have to go through the effort of remembering >>>> which wiring scheme I originally chose. This is just plain >>>> annoying (useless timewaster!). >>>> >>>> What is "common practice" in this case? Should I have opted >>>> for "A" and just committed that fact to memory (similarly, >>>> commit my "B" choice to memory)? Or, tacked a small sign >>>> above the patch panel reminding me of that choice? >>>> >>>> Of course, accommodating either choice is just a matter of >>>> swapping pairs. But, deciding if and when that is necessary >>>> is the PITA (i.e., most connector bodies have color codes >>>> marked on them -- but, you then have to remember whether >>>> *this* code coincides with the scheme you have already >>>> implemented on the other end of the cable...) >>>> >>>> "Standards are great! Everyone should have one!!" :-/ >>> >>> The Leviton jacks I use have both sets of color codes on labels. No >> >> Yes, some of the jacks that I have are similar in that regard. >> >>> need to remember the pattern, just which system you use. If yours are >> >> *That* is exactly the issue! --------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ This isn't >> the sort of thing I do "often". I can tell you which conductor is >> tip/ring in a length of *quad* (since I've done a lot of that sort >> of wiring over the decades) but have only once had to wire a house >> with CAT5! :-/ >> >>> unmarked, take a scrap of Cat5 cable and terminate it, then leave it=20 >>> in >>> your networking crash kit. :) >> >> <frown> What would I have in such a "crash kit"? Currently, I >> keep spare cable, connectors (male/female), wall plates, appliances, >> etc. in specific places in the garage. I've not considered that >> these should be combined into a single location/kit... >> >> What I've been doing is just releasing the screws holding the patch >> panel in place and looking at the back side -- which is clearly >> labeled 568B. Then, putting it back in place and adjusting the >> pairs on the "RJ45" in question to correspond with that. >> >> It's just annoying to have to go through this "exercise" each time. >> (I should just write "B" on the front of the panel!) > >Rule: Use B >For the crimp connector, Tang on bottom wiring is left to right: >wht/org >Org >wht/grn >blu >wht/blu >grn >wht/brn >brn > >For the new cat 6 connectors with blue inserts, top row is solid colors,=
=20
>bottom row striped colors. > >See ><http://alatec.com/info/rj45.html> > >585A is only for crossover. Most nic's are auto sensing MDI/MDI-x and=20 >don't need the x-over cable. ><http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet_crossover_cable>
No. That is not the difference. The difference is pair number ordering. I have my own copy of ANSI/TIA-568. Since all cables (with maybe some exception for crossover cables) are pair for pair and pin for pin what = you have to remember is what you did at the other end of the cable.
> >Cheers >=20 >
On Tue, 06 Mar 2012 01:57:13 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"
<mike.terrell@earthlink.net> wrote:

> > >> There are many non-profits across the country that will work with >> you on projects like that. Some insist on 501(c)3 status but >> many just want you to "be credible". There is no shortage of >> surplus computers! <frown> > > > Around here, they are forcing them to go to 'recylers'. I lost my >last decent source a couple months ago when the city told them that all >unwanted electronics had to be recycled. of course, the companies on >their approved list all insist that they get ALL computer items or they >won't take the bad TVs. >
Yep. The law of (un)intended consequences. ?-)
Hi Michael,

On 3/7/2012 4:55 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

>>>> Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* >>>> "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). >>>> I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of >>>> different hammers) >>> >>> This is over six feet tall and almost four feet wide. >> >> Yes, but how many hammers, chisels, saws, screw/nut-drivers, >> crowbars, etc. can I store in it's drawers? :> Currently, >> my "tool storage" (not counting the 3 kennedy boxes, what's >> in the cars, sitting on my desk or in the "field service kit") >> is a stack of 6x12x18 boxes 48 inches wide, 18 inches deep and >> 7 feet tall. (I used to work for a company that manufactured
----------------------------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>> hand tools and had excellent employee benefits! :> ) > > that was built to store parts, and small tools.
Understood. My "small tools" collection would never fit! :> E.g., I have ~dozen different "planes" -- scrubs, jointers, jacks, spokeshave, block, smoothings, etc. The jointers barely qualify as "small" (24 inches long). Easily 150+ "drivers" (sets of phillips, slotted, hex, torx, clutch, square, pozidriv, Reed & Prince, etc.), etc. I'd need a couple of really wide (though shallow) drawers for each sort of tool. :< Hence the idea of one of those really large (wall size) rolling toolboxes.
> I use old file > cabinets for some tools, and those large steel double door office > cabinets for others. I also have a pair of 24" wide relay racks with > locking doors, shelves and some 1/4" pegboard on walls. > >>>> I put the "part drawers" (mine hold 60 *little* drawers) on a portion >>>> of one of the garage walls. Unfortunately, the same wall has the door >>>> that enters the living area. Code requires it to be "self-closing". >>>> So, each time it slams, the part drawers nudge out just a little >>>> bit more. By the end of a week, I have to manually push them all >>>> back in. >>> >>> Some brands of cabinets are worse than others. Some drop slightly >>> when pushed all the way in. Most of these are over 40 years old, and >>> were industrial grade. I started buying them while I was in high >>> school. :) >> >> That's how I got these. It was the standard "gift" for me at >> the time when folks couldn't figure out what I might "want". >> I have 14 of them (= 840 drawers) that have survived the numerous >> moves. > > I prefered to buy my own, so I always got the same kind.
When you're 10, you much prefer someone else buying them for you! :> I picked out the first one and the others were just "repeats". Not much "surprise" involved each time I got one -- but at least I knew I would get what I *wanted*!
>>> Get some soft sheets of vinyl that will roll up, and hang it over >>> each row of cabinets. That should keep the drawers in place, and free >>> of dust. >> >> On a related note, when *moving* (i.e., cross country) these things, >> wrap the entire cabinet in "saran (plastic) wrap" to keep the drawers >> in place (the cardboard "wrappers/boxes" that I'd diligently kept >> over the decades eventually got torn and tattered from being slid on >> and off the drawer assemblies so many times). > > I used pieces of carboard between the faces of pairs of cabinets and > packing tape when I moved.
Tape sticks to the surfaces. I wrap each drawer in saran wrap (then slide it back in) and the entire cabinet with it. Wrapping each drawer results in some "excess" bunching up in front of each drawer which acts to cushion the little plastic handles.
>>>>> Printed labels on the end of each toolbox and sitting in rows on >>>>> shelves. In the order they are most used. >>>> >>>> Won't work for my "cloth"/canvas bags. >>> >>> A cloth label& fabric glue would. >> >> <shudder> Not fond of glue! > > Fabric glue is flexible, and holds fabric quite well. My mother was > a seamstress and used it for some repairs, when stitches would show.
I don't doubt it holds. My objection is removing it -- changing a label, etc. The leather "luggage tag" approach seems to work well. Looks like it belongs -- without drawing attention to itself.
>> There are shops in Mexico that will actually dismantle the TVs >> and harvest the electronics, etc. (though I suspect the heavy >> metals still end up finding their way into the ground!) > > There is a Japanese patent on a machine that grinds up old circuit > boards to recover the metals. If the boards are fiberglass, they use > acid to remove the remaining metal, then rinse it and sell the shreaded > fiberglass for reuse in things like Spas and other fiberglass products. > I harvest some parts off old boards before sending them to a recycler.
Lately, I have been digging through the *cases* looking for particular shapes of metal pieces (I REALLY wish I owned a brake!).
On Wed, 07 Mar 2012 10:11:19 -0700, Don Y <this@isnotme.com> wrote:

>Hi Michael, > >On 3/7/2012 4:55 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote: > >>>>> Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* >>>>> "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). >>>>> I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of >>>>> different hammers) >>>> >>>> This is over six feet tall and almost four feet wide. >>> >>> Yes, but how many hammers, chisels, saws, screw/nut-drivers, >>> crowbars, etc. can I store in it's drawers? :> Currently, >>> my "tool storage" (not counting the 3 kennedy boxes, what's >>> in the cars, sitting on my desk or in the "field service kit") >>> is a stack of 6x12x18 boxes 48 inches wide, 18 inches deep and >>> 7 feet tall. (I used to work for a company that manufactured > >----------------------------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ > >>> hand tools and had excellent employee benefits! :> ) >> >> that was built to store parts, and small tools. > >Understood. My "small tools" collection would never fit! :> >E.g., I have ~dozen different "planes" -- scrubs, jointers, >jacks, spokeshave, block, smoothings, etc. The jointers barely >qualify as "small" (24 inches long). Easily 150+ "drivers" >(sets of phillips, slotted, hex, torx, clutch, square, pozidriv, >Reed & Prince, etc.), etc. > >I'd need a couple of really wide (though shallow) drawers >for each sort of tool. :< Hence the idea of one of those >really large (wall size) rolling toolboxes.
If you're really looking for one of those, HD has a pretty good price on their stainless tool caddy. Both pieces are around $750, about half what I've seen for similar units elsewhere. I've thought about it, but all of my tools wouldn't fit and I don't need it for the small stuff, really. I also don't know why I'd want it all on wheels. <...>