Forums

T568A/B timewaster

Started by Don Y March 2, 2012
Hi,

I've deployed (wired) ethernet (CAT5, not 6) throughout the
house.  I chose to follow the "B" wiring color conventions
in 8P8C's.

But, from time to time, I end up adding or replacing an
"RJ45" and always have to go through the effort of remembering
which wiring scheme I originally chose.  This is just plain
annoying (useless timewaster!).

What is "common practice" in this case?  Should I have opted
for "A" and just committed that fact to memory (similarly,
commit my "B" choice to memory)?  Or, tacked a small sign
above the patch panel reminding me of that choice?

Of course, accommodating either choice is just a matter of
swapping pairs.  But, deciding if and when that is necessary
is the PITA (i.e., most connector bodies have color codes
marked on them -- but, you then have to remember whether
*this* code coincides with the scheme you have already
implemented on the other end of the cable...)

"Standards are great!  Everyone should have one!!"  :-/
Don Y wrote:
> > Hi, > > I've deployed (wired) ethernet (CAT5, not 6) throughout the > house. I chose to follow the "B" wiring color conventions > in 8P8C's. > > But, from time to time, I end up adding or replacing an > "RJ45" and always have to go through the effort of remembering > which wiring scheme I originally chose. This is just plain > annoying (useless timewaster!). > > What is "common practice" in this case? Should I have opted > for "A" and just committed that fact to memory (similarly, > commit my "B" choice to memory)? Or, tacked a small sign > above the patch panel reminding me of that choice? > > Of course, accommodating either choice is just a matter of > swapping pairs. But, deciding if and when that is necessary > is the PITA (i.e., most connector bodies have color codes > marked on them -- but, you then have to remember whether > *this* code coincides with the scheme you have already > implemented on the other end of the cable...) > > "Standards are great! Everyone should have one!!" :-/
The Leviton jacks I use have both sets of color codes on labels. No need to remember the pattern, just which system you use. If yours are unmarked, take a scrap of Cat5 cable and terminate it, then leave it in your networking crash kit. :) -- You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
Don Y <this@isnotme.com> wrote:

>Hi, > >I've deployed (wired) ethernet (CAT5, not 6) throughout the >house. I chose to follow the "B" wiring color conventions >in 8P8C's. > >But, from time to time, I end up adding or replacing an >"RJ45" and always have to go through the effort of remembering >which wiring scheme I originally chose. This is just plain >annoying (useless timewaster!). > >What is "common practice" in this case? Should I have opted >for "A" and just committed that fact to memory (similarly, >commit my "B" choice to memory)? Or, tacked a small sign >above the patch panel reminding me of that choice?
Its always B. A is for the other side of an ethernet cross cable (note only orange and green are swapped). -- Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply indicates you are not using the right tools... nico@nctdevpuntnl (punt=.) --------------------------------------------------------------
Hi Michael,

On 3/2/2012 3:03 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

>> I've deployed (wired) ethernet (CAT5, not 6) throughout the >> house. I chose to follow the "B" wiring color conventions >> in 8P8C's. >> >> But, from time to time, I end up adding or replacing an >> "RJ45" and always have to go through the effort of remembering >> which wiring scheme I originally chose. This is just plain >> annoying (useless timewaster!). >> >> What is "common practice" in this case? Should I have opted >> for "A" and just committed that fact to memory (similarly, >> commit my "B" choice to memory)? Or, tacked a small sign >> above the patch panel reminding me of that choice? >> >> Of course, accommodating either choice is just a matter of >> swapping pairs. But, deciding if and when that is necessary >> is the PITA (i.e., most connector bodies have color codes >> marked on them -- but, you then have to remember whether >> *this* code coincides with the scheme you have already >> implemented on the other end of the cable...) >> >> "Standards are great! Everyone should have one!!" :-/ > > The Leviton jacks I use have both sets of color codes on labels. No
Yes, some of the jacks that I have are similar in that regard.
> need to remember the pattern, just which system you use. If yours are
*That* is exactly the issue! --------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ This isn't the sort of thing I do "often". I can tell you which conductor is tip/ring in a length of *quad* (since I've done a lot of that sort of wiring over the decades) but have only once had to wire a house with CAT5! :-/
> unmarked, take a scrap of Cat5 cable and terminate it, then leave it in > your networking crash kit. :)
<frown> What would I have in such a "crash kit"? Currently, I keep spare cable, connectors (male/female), wall plates, appliances, etc. in specific places in the garage. I've not considered that these should be combined into a single location/kit... What I've been doing is just releasing the screws holding the patch panel in place and looking at the back side -- which is clearly labeled 568B. Then, putting it back in place and adjusting the pairs on the "RJ45" in question to correspond with that. It's just annoying to have to go through this "exercise" each time. (I should just write "B" on the front of the panel!)
"Don Y" <this@isnotme.com> wrote in message 
news:jiroi1$g6q$1@speranza.aioe.org...
> Hi Michael, > > On 3/2/2012 3:03 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote: > >>> I've deployed (wired) ethernet (CAT5, not 6) throughout the >>> house. I chose to follow the "B" wiring color conventions >>> in 8P8C's. >>> >>> But, from time to time, I end up adding or replacing an >>> "RJ45" and always have to go through the effort of remembering >>> which wiring scheme I originally chose. This is just plain >>> annoying (useless timewaster!). >>> >>> What is "common practice" in this case? Should I have opted >>> for "A" and just committed that fact to memory (similarly, >>> commit my "B" choice to memory)? Or, tacked a small sign >>> above the patch panel reminding me of that choice? >>> >>> Of course, accommodating either choice is just a matter of >>> swapping pairs. But, deciding if and when that is necessary >>> is the PITA (i.e., most connector bodies have color codes >>> marked on them -- but, you then have to remember whether >>> *this* code coincides with the scheme you have already >>> implemented on the other end of the cable...) >>> >>> "Standards are great! Everyone should have one!!" :-/ >> >> The Leviton jacks I use have both sets of color codes on labels. No > > Yes, some of the jacks that I have are similar in that regard. > >> need to remember the pattern, just which system you use. If yours are > > *That* is exactly the issue! --------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ This isn't > the sort of thing I do "often". I can tell you which conductor is > tip/ring in a length of *quad* (since I've done a lot of that sort > of wiring over the decades) but have only once had to wire a house > with CAT5! :-/ > >> unmarked, take a scrap of Cat5 cable and terminate it, then leave it >> in >> your networking crash kit. :) > > <frown> What would I have in such a "crash kit"? Currently, I > keep spare cable, connectors (male/female), wall plates, appliances, > etc. in specific places in the garage. I've not considered that > these should be combined into a single location/kit... > > What I've been doing is just releasing the screws holding the patch > panel in place and looking at the back side -- which is clearly > labeled 568B. Then, putting it back in place and adjusting the > pairs on the "RJ45" in question to correspond with that. > > It's just annoying to have to go through this "exercise" each time. > (I should just write "B" on the front of the panel!)
Rule: Use B For the crimp connector, Tang on bottom wiring is left to right: wht/org Org wht/grn blu wht/blu grn wht/brn brn For the new cat 6 connectors with blue inserts, top row is solid colors, bottom row striped colors. See <http://alatec.com/info/rj45.html> 585A is only for crossover. Most nic's are auto sensing MDI/MDI-x and don't need the x-over cable. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet_crossover_cable> Cheers
In article <jiroi1$g6q$1@speranza.aioe.org>, Don Y <this@isnotme.com> 
wrote:

> What I've been doing is just releasing the screws holding the patch > panel in place and looking at the back side -- which is clearly > labeled 568B. Then, putting it back in place and adjusting the > pairs on the "RJ45" in question to correspond with that.
Are you worrying about the wall-scheme wring every time you plug in a new patch cord??? That's what it sounds like. Patch cords don't care how the wall is wired. Just make both ends of the patch cord the same. Or put a B cheat sheet on your crimper... -- Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.
On 3/2/2012 6:30 PM, Ecnerwal wrote:
> In article<jiroi1$g6q$1@speranza.aioe.org>, Don Y<this@isnotme.com> > wrote: > >> What I've been doing is just releasing the screws holding the patch >> panel in place and looking at the back side -- which is clearly >> labeled 568B. Then, putting it back in place and adjusting the >> pairs on the "RJ45" in question to correspond with that. > > Are you worrying about the wall-scheme wring every time you plug in a > new patch cord??? That's what it sounds like.
No. The wiring at the patch panel is largely static. I've been slowly "terminating" the "far ends" of drops that have been sitting in walls or J-boxes "unused" up to this point. When I get around to installing the "RJ45" on the far end of the drop, I end up scratching my head trying to remember how I wired the patch panel end of the lines (not wanting to introduce a "twist" to the cable!). I could consult any of the other "far ends" -- but, they don't all necessarily have the same make+model connectors. OTOH, the patch panel is a constant for all of the drops. So, loosen four screws, tilt panel forward and peek behind it for the "authoritative reference".
> Patch cords don't care how the wall is wired. Just make both ends of the > patch cord the same. > > Or put a B cheat sheet on your crimper...
I don't even need the "cheat sheet" (to track the colors). I just need a mnemonic so I remember "use the B wiring scheme". E.g., if I were to write "T568B" on the *front* of the patch panel this would solve the problem (though in a cosmetically unappealing way).
Hi Martin,

On 3/2/2012 6:19 PM, Martin Riddle wrote:

> Rule: Use B
OK. A friend (from whom many of the connectors came) replied that the "A" wiring is common in telco applications. He reminded me that he also gave me several CAT3 patch panels that are compatible with 66-block mounts (suggesting I check the color scheme on those).
> For the crimp connector, Tang on bottom wiring is left to right:
I actually dislike the tang on the bottom (prefering to *see* what I am trying to manipulate) but have grown accustomed to it there -- just *feeling* for it.
> wht/org > Org > wht/grn > blu > wht/blu > grn > wht/brn > brn
Color codes are indicated on each of the jacks. But, sometimes A & B schemes (prompting me to question how I had wired the other connectors). I have a wide variety of make/models to choose from so the actual physical arrangement of the individual conductors varies. Some present two rows of 4 IDC points; others a single row of 8. Some rows are "on axis" with the mating connector; others are normal to that. And, of course, the "RJ25's" are yet another beast... I suspect I should just document all of this someplace -- other than the labels on the patch panel (make an actual wire map instead of just identifying each drop on the patch panel).
> For the new cat 6 connectors with blue inserts, top row is solid colors, > bottom row striped colors.
I haven't run any CAT6 in the walls. 100Mb is an order of magnitude faster than anything between rooms is likely to need. The truly fat pipes are between servers and, there, I opted to just use store-bought cables and dedicated switches.
Hi Nico,

On 3/2/2012 3:17 PM, Nico Coesel wrote:
> Don Y<this@isnotme.com> wrote: > >> I've deployed (wired) ethernet (CAT5, not 6) throughout the >> house. I chose to follow the "B" wiring color conventions >> in 8P8C's. >> >> But, from time to time, I end up adding or replacing an >> "RJ45" and always have to go through the effort of remembering >> which wiring scheme I originally chose. This is just plain >> annoying (useless timewaster!). >> >> What is "common practice" in this case? Should I have opted >> for "A" and just committed that fact to memory (similarly, >> commit my "B" choice to memory)? Or, tacked a small sign >> above the patch panel reminding me of that choice? > > Its always B. A is for the other side of an ethernet cross cable (note > only orange and green are swapped).
It seems like it is only "always B" for (computer) network applications. The telco world apparently also uses the same 8P8C but with the "A" color scheme. I just need to make a document showing my wire map, connector color schemes, etc. and toss it in the "notes" file. I think I have a scale floorplan of the house that I could annotate to show actual placement of the various drops...
On 2012-03-02, Don Y <this@isnotme.com> wrote:
> Hi, > > I've deployed (wired) ethernet (CAT5, not 6) throughout the > house. I chose to follow the "B" wiring color conventions > in 8P8C's.
> What is "common practice" in this case? Should I have opted > for "A" and just committed that fact to memory (similarly, > commit my "B" choice to memory)? Or, tacked a small sign > above the patch panel reminding me of that choice?
It depends where you are. AIUI B exists solely to match US RJ-12 wiring colours, most other places use A -- &acirc;&scaron;&sbquo;&acirc;&scaron;&fnof; 100% natural