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Your Favorite ARM?

Started by Martin Riddle December 26, 2011
Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors?
I've never worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel
AVR32, but the ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more.
Preferable package is LQFP.  And not so pricey tools.
12 bit DAC and ADC a plus.

Cheers

 


On 12/26/2011 7:19 PM, Martin Riddle wrote:
> Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors? > I've never worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel > AVR32, but the ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more. > Preferable package is LQFP. And not so pricey tools. > 12 bit DAC and ADC a plus. > > Cheers
Take a look at Cypress' PSoC5. Looks pretty nice to me. Cheers to you, too. John S
On 12/26/2011 7:21 PM, John S wrote:
> On 12/26/2011 7:19 PM, Martin Riddle wrote: >> Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors? >> I've never worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel >> AVR32, but the ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more. >> Preferable package is LQFP. And not so pricey tools. >> 12 bit DAC and ADC a plus. >> >> Cheers > > > Take a look at Cypress' PSoC5. Looks pretty nice to me. > > Cheers to you, too. > John S >
Forgot to mention that "PSoC Creator" is what you will use with it. It essentially allows you to draw a schematic and provides you with code to manage it. John S
On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 20:19:27 -0500, "Martin Riddle"
<martin_rid@verizon.net> wrote:

>Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors? >I've never worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel >AVR32, but the ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more. >Preferable package is LQFP. And not so pricey tools. >12 bit DAC and ADC a plus. > >Cheers > >
Waht is an ARM? (Dont say the thing attached to my shoulder :) ).
On 27 Dec., 02:19, "Martin Riddle" <martin_...@verizon.net> wrote:
> Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors? > I've never worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel > AVR32, but the ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more. > Preferable package is LQFP. =A0And not so pricey tools. > 12 bit DAC and ADC a plus. > > Cheers
first ones that comes to mind is LPC and stm32f there's gcc for ARM and they can be programmed with a serial port, usb and more so tools can be free -Lasse
On Dec 26, 5:35=A0pm, j...@myplace.com wrote:
> On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 20:19:27 -0500, "Martin Riddle" > > <martin_...@verizon.net> wrote: > >Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors? > >I've never worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel > >AVR32, but the ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more. > >Preferable package is LQFP. =A0And not so pricey tools. > >12 bit DAC and ADC a plus. > > >Cheers > > Waht is an ARM? =A0(Dont say the thing attached to my shoulder :) ).
The one in your phone, most likely.
On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 20:19:27 -0500, "Martin Riddle"
<martin_rid@verizon.net> wrote:

>Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors? >I've never worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel >AVR32, but the ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more. >Preferable package is LQFP. And not so pricey tools. >12 bit DAC and ADC a plus. > >Cheers > > >
Depends on how much horespower you need. We have one board with a dozen LPC1754s on board, and they work fine. It has a 12-bit ADC and a 10-bit DAC, on-chip flash and ram, 100 MHz. We pay about $3.50 each for them, programmed by Arrow with our code. The 12-bit ADC is accurate to 9 bits maybe. We wound up doing a curve fit to every one at cal time, to get it to 0.1%. uP ADCs tend to be like that. We also use a bunch of LPC3250s, much more serious parts: BGA, vector floating point, DRAM controller, 260 MHz or so, about $7.50. The NXP LPCs are OK, but the manuals are sort of pitiful. John
On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 20:19:27 -0500, Martin Riddle wrote:

> Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors? I've never > worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel AVR32, but the > ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more. Preferable > package is LQFP. And not so pricey tools. 12 bit DAC and ADC a plus. > > Cheers
ST, TI, NXP all have various flavors of ARM and reasonable priced development boards. I have development boards from all three. I just finished a Cortex M3 design with a LPC1768 LQFP. Ethernet, CAN, SPI and a bunch of GPIO. You can get a LPCXpresso board from Mouser for 32 bucks and download the free (but limited) Code Red compiler suite. I switched to Eclipse and GNU cross compiler and OpenOCD for JTAG programming/debug. Like I mentioned, TI and ST have similar offerings. Really depends on what you need. Ethernet? USB? A bunch of UARTS? How many channels for ADC? -- Chisolm Republic of Texas
On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 18:57:49 -0800, the renowned John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote:

>On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 20:19:27 -0500, "Martin Riddle" ><martin_rid@verizon.net> wrote: > >>Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors? >>I've never worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel >>AVR32, but the ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more. >>Preferable package is LQFP. And not so pricey tools. >>12 bit DAC and ADC a plus. >> >>Cheers >> >> >> > >Depends on how much horespower you need. We have one board with a >dozen LPC1754s on board, and they work fine. It has a 12-bit ADC and a >10-bit DAC, on-chip flash and ram, 100 MHz. We pay about $3.50 each >for them, programmed by Arrow with our code. > >The 12-bit ADC is accurate to 9 bits maybe. We wound up doing a curve >fit to every one at cal time, to get it to 0.1%. uP ADCs tend to be >like that. > >We also use a bunch of LPC3250s, much more serious parts: BGA, vector >floating point, DRAM controller, 260 MHz or so, about $7.50. > >The NXP LPCs are OK, but the manuals are sort of pitiful. > >John >
The erstwhile Luminary, now a part of Texas Instruments, Stellaris Cortex M3 parts are pretty nice too, esp. for their built-in ethernet PHY. If you are serious about on-chip analog peripherals, you can look at relevant AD parts which contain pretty decent ADC/DAC converters and an ARM7TDMI (32 and 16 bit modes) as sort of a peripheral. Best regards, Spehro Pefhany -- "it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward" speff@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
"John Larkin" <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote in 
message news:5fcif792ljl9morgkae9kq27stpenoc5dj@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 20:19:27 -0500, "Martin Riddle" > <martin_rid@verizon.net> wrote: > >>Which Mfg has the best options for their ARM processors? >>I've never worked with a ARM, and I was going to play with a Atmel >>AVR32, but the ARM seems to have more features for a buck or two more. >>Preferable package is LQFP. And not so pricey tools. >>12 bit DAC and ADC a plus. >> >>Cheers >> >> >> > > Depends on how much horespower you need. We have one board with a > dozen LPC1754s on board, and they work fine. It has a 12-bit ADC and a > 10-bit DAC, on-chip flash and ram, 100 MHz. We pay about $3.50 each > for them, programmed by Arrow with our code. > > The 12-bit ADC is accurate to 9 bits maybe. We wound up doing a curve > fit to every one at cal time, to get it to 0.1%. uP ADCs tend to be > like that. > > We also use a bunch of LPC3250s, much more serious parts: BGA, vector > floating point, DRAM controller, 260 MHz or so, about $7.50. > > The NXP LPCs are OK, but the manuals are sort of pitiful. > > John > >
Ok, I can live with that. I never seen really good performance from on board ADC's anyway, always some errata associated with them. DAC's were always external. The LPC17xx looks like it would fit the bill. Even has a Ethernet which I will need. This must be ARMv7 = Cortex-M3... Ok, I'm off to find a demo board. Thanks! Cheers