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Computerized Audio Project.

Started by Ken S. Tucker February 6, 2011
We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker.
I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound
we want, in 0-255 amplitudes.
Essentially were making a speech synthesizer.
Ken
On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 10:08:01 -0800 (PST), "Ken S. Tucker"
<dynamics@vianet.on.ca> wrote:

>We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker. >I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound >we want, in 0-255 amplitudes. >Essentially were making a speech synthesizer. >Ken
The Linux boot loader GRUB allows one to fire the "PC Speaker" with tones and pauses. I boot up with F&#2013266172;r Elise and Close Encounters on one of my machines.
On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 10:08:01 -0800 (PST), "Ken S. Tucker"
<dynamics@vianet.on.ca> wrote:

>We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker. >I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound >we want, in 0-255 amplitudes. >Essentially were making a speech synthesizer. >Ken
It will probably sound ratty. Telephone systems work at 8 bits, but the coding is nonlinear. John
On Feb 6, 10:31 am, TheGlimmerMan
<justaglim...@thebarattheendoftheuniverse.org> wrote:
> On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 10:08:01 -0800 (PST), "Ken S. Tucker" > > <dynam...@vianet.on.ca> wrote: > >We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker. > >I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound > >we want, in 0-255 amplitudes. > >Essentially were making a speech synthesizer. > >Ken > > The Linux boot loader GRUB allows one to fire the "PC Speaker" with > tones and pauses. I boot up with F=FCr Elise and Close Encounters on one > of my machines.
Thanks, I'll pass that along. A whisper is a modulation of white noise (I think) and can of course be amplified, seems the printer cables 8 bit parallel would be good enough. Is the DAC-08 an easy to use chip, looks simple. Regards Ken
Ken S. Tucker wrote:

> We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker. > I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound > we want, in 0-255 amplitudes. > Essentially were making a speech synthesizer.
Nowadays soundcards are not that expensive any more :-) -- Frank Buss, http://www.frank-buss.de piano and more: http://www.youtube.com/user/frankbuss
On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 10:51:03 -0800, the renowned John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote:

>On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 10:08:01 -0800 (PST), "Ken S. Tucker" ><dynamics@vianet.on.ca> wrote: > >>We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker. >>I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound >>we want, in 0-255 amplitudes. >>Essentially were making a speech synthesizer. >>Ken > >It will probably sound ratty. Telephone systems work at 8 bits, but >the coding is nonlinear. > >John >
_One_ bit (at something like 8kHz sample rate) is enough to be understandable, IIRC, but it's not pretty. Best regards, Spehro Pefhany -- "it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward" speff@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 14:38:16 -0500, Spehro Pefhany
<speffSNIP@interlogDOTyou.knowwhat> wrote:

>On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 10:51:03 -0800, the renowned John Larkin ><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: > >>On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 10:08:01 -0800 (PST), "Ken S. Tucker" >><dynamics@vianet.on.ca> wrote: >> >>>We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker. >>>I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound >>>we want, in 0-255 amplitudes. >>>Essentially were making a speech synthesizer. >>>Ken >> >>It will probably sound ratty. Telephone systems work at 8 bits, but >>the coding is nonlinear. >> >>John >> > >_One_ bit (at something like 8kHz sample rate) is enough to be >understandable, IIRC, but it's not pretty. > > > >Best regards, >Spehro Pefhany
I've always been fond of delta modulation for simple-minded audio... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_modulation particularly the adaptive variations. ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson, CTO | mens | | Analog Innovations, Inc. | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | Phoenix, Arizona 85048 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | Remember: Once you go over the hill, you pick up speed
On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 12:46:00 -0700, the renowned Jim Thompson
<To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote:

>On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 14:38:16 -0500, Spehro Pefhany ><speffSNIP@interlogDOTyou.knowwhat> wrote: > >>On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 10:51:03 -0800, the renowned John Larkin >><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >> >>>On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 10:08:01 -0800 (PST), "Ken S. Tucker" >>><dynamics@vianet.on.ca> wrote: >>> >>>>We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker. >>>>I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound >>>>we want, in 0-255 amplitudes. >>>>Essentially were making a speech synthesizer. >>>>Ken >>> >>>It will probably sound ratty. Telephone systems work at 8 bits, but >>>the coding is nonlinear. >>> >>>John >>> >> >>_One_ bit (at something like 8kHz sample rate) is enough to be >>understandable, IIRC, but it's not pretty. >> >> >> >>Best regards, >>Spehro Pefhany > >I've always been fond of delta modulation for simple-minded audio... > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_modulation > >particularly the adaptive variations. > > ...Jim Thompson
Isn't that what is used in most of the toy sound effect chips? I did a project with some OTP ones some years back and I think it was a form of delta modulation that was not only very simple, but kept the ROM requirements relatively reasonable. Best regards, Spehro Pefhany -- "it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward" speff@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 14:59:06 -0500, Spehro Pefhany
<speffSNIP@interlogDOTyou.knowwhat> wrote:

>On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 12:46:00 -0700, the renowned Jim Thompson ><To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: > >>On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 14:38:16 -0500, Spehro Pefhany >><speffSNIP@interlogDOTyou.knowwhat> wrote: >> >>>On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 10:51:03 -0800, the renowned John Larkin >>><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>> >>>>On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 10:08:01 -0800 (PST), "Ken S. Tucker" >>>><dynamics@vianet.on.ca> wrote: >>>> >>>>>We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker. >>>>>I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound >>>>>we want, in 0-255 amplitudes. >>>>>Essentially were making a speech synthesizer. >>>>>Ken >>>> >>>>It will probably sound ratty. Telephone systems work at 8 bits, but >>>>the coding is nonlinear. >>>> >>>>John >>>> >>> >>>_One_ bit (at something like 8kHz sample rate) is enough to be >>>understandable, IIRC, but it's not pretty. >>> >>> >>> >>>Best regards, >>>Spehro Pefhany >> >>I've always been fond of delta modulation for simple-minded audio... >> >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_modulation >> >>particularly the adaptive variations. >> >> ...Jim Thompson > >Isn't that what is used in most of the toy sound effect chips? I did a >project with some OTP ones some years back and I think it was a form >of delta modulation that was not only very simple, but kept the ROM >requirements relatively reasonable. > > >Best regards, >Spehro Pefhany
I think so. I first ran onto the concept in the late '60's for some telephone chips. The adaptive variations, which can change slope via an algorithm that looks at repetitive patterns of zeros or ones, can sound quite nice. Like the Motorola MC3417 Continuously Variable Slope Delta Modulator... http://www.ece.rutgers.edu/~orfanidi/ece346/sigma-delta.pdf ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson, CTO | mens | | Analog Innovations, Inc. | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | Phoenix, Arizona 85048 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | Remember: Once you go over the hill, you pick up speed
Spehro Pefhany wrote:
> On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 10:51:03 -0800, the renowned John Larkin >>On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 10:08:01 -0800 (PST), "Ken S. Tucker"
>>>We using the printer cable to send 8 bit waveforms to a speaker. >>>I figure using a DAC-08 (D to A converter) will create any sound >>>we want, in 0-255 amplitudes. >>>Essentially were making a speech synthesizer. >>>Ken >> >>It will probably sound ratty. Telephone systems work at 8 bits, but >>the coding is nonlinear. > > _One_ bit (at something like 8kHz sample rate) is enough to be > understandable, IIRC, but it's not pretty. >
Many years ago, before there even _were_ sound cards, I got some advertising disk which when run, would play some herald trumpet fanfare over the PC (one bit) speaker. And yes, it was a little ratty, but recognizably brass instruments. It's not that hard to do - just play your audio into a comparator, and time the intervals between zero-crossings. Cheers! Rich