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Lubricate coax connection

Started by AK July 20, 2019
It's hard to unscrew the coaxial cable from the antenna.

Is there something that can make that easier and minimize corrosion?

I think there is corrosion occurring on the aluminum "arms" of the antenna as well.

https://imgur.com/ntxK7ou

On Sat, 20 Jul 2019 09:36:00 -0700, AK wrote:

> It's hard to unscrew the coaxial cable from the antenna. > > Is there something that can make that easier and minimize corrosion? > > I think there is corrosion occurring on the aluminum "arms" of the > antenna as well. > > https://imgur.com/ntxK7ou
Self-amalgamating tape; silicon sealant. -- This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.
On Saturday, July 20, 2019 at 2:48:20 PM UTC-5, Cursitor Doom wrote:
> On Sat, 20 Jul 2019 09:36:00 -0700, AK wrote: > > > It's hard to unscrew the coaxial cable from the antenna. > > > > Is there something that can make that easier and minimize corrosion? > > > > I think there is corrosion occurring on the aluminum "arms" of the > > antenna as well. > > > > https://imgur.com/ntxK7ou > > Self-amalgamating tape; silicon sealant. > > > > -- > This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via > the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other > protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of > GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet > protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.
Thanks Mr. Cursitor. Andy
On Sat, 20 Jul 2019 09:36:00 -0700 (PDT), AK
<scientist77017@gmail.com> wrote:

>It's hard to unscrew the coaxial cable from the antenna. > >Is there something that can make that easier and minimize corrosion? > >I think there is corrosion occurring on the aluminum "arms" of the antenna as well. > >https://imgur.com/ntxK7ou
Rub some nice heavy moly grease on the threads maybe. That's good for light bulb sockets too. Someone told me that WD40 is corrosive, so maybe don't use that. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc lunatic fringe electronics
On Saturday, July 20, 2019 at 4:47:23 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
> On Sat, 20 Jul 2019 09:36:00 -0700 (PDT), AK > <scientist77017@gmail.com> wrote: > > >It's hard to unscrew the coaxial cable from the antenna. > > > >Is there something that can make that easier and minimize corrosion? > > > >I think there is corrosion occurring on the aluminum "arms" of the antenna as well. > > > >https://imgur.com/ntxK7ou > > Rub some nice heavy moly grease on the threads maybe. That's good for > light bulb sockets too. > > Someone told me that WD40 is corrosive, so maybe don't use that. > > > -- > > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > > lunatic fringe electronics
Thanks. I used some contact cleaner on both male and female connectors. I noticed a rubber gasket in the female connector. In the past, I just tightened enuf until my reception looked good. :-) I made sure to tighten it down real tight. There is some slight oxidation occurring on the aluminum masts, but it is not affecting the tv reception. Andy
On Sat, 20 Jul 2019 14:47:15 -0700, John Larkin wrote:


> Someone told me that WD40 is corrosive, so maybe don't use that.
Corrosive WRT what?
On Sat, 20 Jul 2019 09:36:00 -0700 (PDT), AK
<scientist77017@gmail.com> wrote:

>It's hard to unscrew the coaxial cable from the antenna. > >Is there something that can make that easier and minimize corrosion? > >I think there is corrosion occurring on the aluminum "arms" of the antenna as well. > >https://imgur.com/ntxK7ou
I use silicon grease. Make an effort to keep moisture out of connections. Ordinary vinyl electrical tape is good enough for most applications. The outside layers will suffer from sunlight but the inside will survive untouched. Stretch it tight, minimize wrinkles, use several layers. Pure silicon grease is good because it is inert (doesn't cause corrosion) and stays where it is put without running or evaporating. "Super Lube 91003 Silicone Dielectric Grease" is what I use. Good stuff for lubing the ends of compression tubing fittings too for a tight seal and no metallic spalling. Being inert makes it easy on refrigeration compressors too. Silicon caulking is not inert or the same as the pure stuff, it may contain acids.
Thanks 4 the detailed helpful info.