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Teaching Transistor Theory

Started by Cursitor Doom July 13, 2019
I've just had a pedagogic revelation! Here it is: 

Transistor theory is much more effectively taught if explained as a 
*discovery* (which it was) than as an invention (which it never was). 
All these decades I've been wrestling with this conundrum and all it took 
to clear things up was a handful of these amazing mushrooms. Yay! :-D
Okay, I was joking. But seriously, think about it. The concept is far 
more effectively absorbed by students if presented this way.



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On Sat, 13 Jul 2019 22:07:56 -0000 (UTC), Cursitor Doom
<curd@notformail.com> wrote:

>I've just had a pedagogic revelation! Here it is: > >Transistor theory is much more effectively taught if explained as a >*discovery* (which it was) than as an invention (which it never was). >All these decades I've been wrestling with this conundrum and all it took >to clear things up was a handful of these amazing mushrooms. Yay! :-D >Okay, I was joking. But seriously, think about it. The concept is far >more effectively absorbed by students if presented this way.
What differnet would it make to teaching? Gravity was a discovery too. The point-contact transistor was discovered while making deliberate efforts to create a transistor. The junction transistor was a deliberate invention. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc lunatic fringe electronics
On Sat, 13 Jul 2019 17:41:17 -0700, John Larkin wrote:

> On Sat, 13 Jul 2019 22:07:56 -0000 (UTC), Cursitor Doom > <curd@notformail.com> wrote: > > The point-contact transistor was discovered while making deliberate > efforts to create a transistor. > > The junction transistor was a deliberate invention.
Ahem.. "William Bradford Shockley Jr. (February 13, 1910 &ndash; August 12, 1989) was an American physicist and inventor. Shockley was the manager of a research group at Bell Labs that included John Bardeen and Walter Brattain. The three scientists were jointly awarded the 1956 Nobel Prize in Physics for 'their researches on semiconductors and their discovery of the transistor effect.'" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Shockley -- This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.
So they discovered oil and started building cars. Big deal.=20

And what's this approach bullshit ? Just explain how the thing works and th=
at's that. Who Shockley was means jack shit. Where it happened means jack s=
hit. When it happened means jack shit.=20

The principle that needs to be taught - bipolar transistor. You put current=
 through the base emitter junction and it causes leakage from the collector=
. ALL TRANSISTORS ARE COMMON EMITTER, only its orientation with respect to =
common is what changes.=20

Ohm's law, fuck all that sigma this and delta that. Your car has two headli=
ghts. They pull 3 amps each because they are four ohms with 12 volts on the=
m. That adds up to 36 watts because watts are amps times volts. When you ha=
ve two of them in parallel it is still 12 volts but now that pair of them i=
s pulling six amps because two four ohms in parallel comes to 2 ohms. So 12=
 volts times 6 amps is 72 watts for the pair.=20

One paragraph. Who cares who Ohm was, or Watt, or Volta. Who cares how many=
 columbs in an amp. Who even cares if you are paying attention to electrons=
 or holes ? Suffice it to say there are two polarities.=20

Are you teaching someone how to design transistors ? I kinda doubt that.=20

One guy I taught uses it all the time at work, and makes more money than me=
, GRRRR.=20

I am an autodidact like 90%. I agree they teach wrong. Like 180=C2=BA is th=
e same as inversion. Try it with a sawtooth buddy. And they teach you about=
 car batteries, the acid the ions and ll that shit. Fuck it, just charge it=
 and shut up. When it doesn't take a charge either put epsom salts in it or=
 buy a new one. Do I have to be a chemist to fix a Marantz amp ? (well actu=
ally there was this one...some other time)

Transistors. someone invented them. We got them. They work like such...and =
you order them online from like Digikey or Mouser, or actually Newark has b=
een better on a couple of things. Bam. Want to know who figured it out ? I =
don't know the guy, and he is dead. That's it.=20

When i was younger I had what was called a science encyclopedia. One of tho=
se send you a volume a month. I read it cover to cover EXCEPT the bios on i=
nventors etc. Later in life I got interested in that and read those. I foun=
d it interesting. for one, many innovators and inventors were either off th=
e boat or first generation here. AND, even in the old days, some of them li=
ved to be 80 or so. See, human life span has not gone up, the AVERAGE lifes=
pan has. It does not mean the same thing, it just means less people get kil=
led now. And now we're overpopulated, see, the old way was better.
On Sun, 14 Jul 2019 08:37:47 -0000 (UTC), Cursitor Doom
<curd@notformail.com> wrote:

>On Sat, 13 Jul 2019 17:41:17 -0700, John Larkin wrote: > >> On Sat, 13 Jul 2019 22:07:56 -0000 (UTC), Cursitor Doom >> <curd@notformail.com> wrote: >> >> The point-contact transistor was discovered while making deliberate >> efforts to create a transistor. >> >> The junction transistor was a deliberate invention. > >Ahem.. > >"William Bradford Shockley Jr. (February 13, 1910 &#2013266070; August 12, 1989) was >an American physicist and inventor. Shockley was the manager of a >research group at Bell Labs that included John Bardeen and Walter >Brattain. The three scientists were jointly awarded the 1956 Nobel Prize >in Physics for 'their researches on semiconductors and their discovery of >the transistor effect.'" > >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Shockley
I had lunch with Walter Brattain; nice old guy. They were=trying to make a jfet -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc picosecond timing precision measurement jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On Tue, 16 Jul 2019 10:13:05 -0700, John Larkin wrote:
 
> I had lunch with Walter Brattain; nice old guy.
Lucky old Walter. I'm *still* waiting for my invite but it seems I'm not important or interesting enough! -- This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.
On Tue, 16 Jul 2019 17:46:48 -0000 (UTC), Cursitor Doom
<curd@notformail.com> wrote:

>On Tue, 16 Jul 2019 10:13:05 -0700, John Larkin wrote: > >> I had lunch with Walter Brattain; nice old guy. > >Lucky old Walter. I'm *still* waiting for my invite but it seems I'm not >important or interesting enough!
It's probably too late to have lunch with Walter. But I'll buy you lunch or beer any time you're in the neighborhood. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc picosecond timing precision measurement jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On Tue, 16 Jul 2019 12:47:21 -0700, John Larkin wrote:

> It's probably too late to have lunch with Walter. But I'll buy you lunch > or beer any time you're in the neighborhood.
Well, that was the bet, after all. But then you promptly moved lock, stock and barrel to San Francisco! You know I'm homophobic, so that's why you moved. All that upheaval and expense just to avoid buying me a burger and a beer, you rotter! :-D -- This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.
On Tue, 16 Jul 2019 23:02:01 -0000 (UTC), Cursitor Doom
<curd@notformail.com> wrote:

>On Tue, 16 Jul 2019 12:47:21 -0700, John Larkin wrote: > >> It's probably too late to have lunch with Walter. But I'll buy you lunch >> or beer any time you're in the neighborhood. > >Well, that was the bet, after all. But then you promptly moved lock, >stock and barrel to San Francisco! You know I'm homophobic, so that's why >you moved. All that upheaval and expense just to avoid buying me a burger >and a beer, you rotter! :-D
I've been in SF about 40 years. When did we make a bet? Did I lose? The gay thing isn't a big deal here any more; it was wild when I arrived, pre-AIDS, and I lived in the Castro back then. Now it has breeders pushing baby buggies around. We were having a beer at a lesbian bar on Courtland, Wild Side West, and I stepped away from our table for a minute. A straight guy tried to hit on Mo! She was kind of flattered. My next-door neighbor is gay. He lets me use his chain saw. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc picosecond timing precision measurement jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 18:03:07 -0700, John Larkin wrote:

> I've been in SF about 40 years. When did we make a bet? Did I lose?
Late 1990s and yes, you did lose.
> > We were having a beer at a lesbian bar on Courtland, Wild Side West, > and I stepped away from our table for a minute. A straight guy tried to > hit on Mo! She was kind of flattered.
I assume you kicked his arse. - sorry- "ass"? I assume you kicked his sorry ass?
> My next-door neighbor is gay. He lets me use his chain saw.
Some of them are fine. It's the 'in-yer-face' types that grind my gears. -- This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.