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Frustration

Started by AK May 13, 2019
Electronic can be quite frustrating.

I put together a circuit for a laser alarm.

It does not work. 

There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions.

I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors.

:-)
On 14/05/2019 10:22 am, AK wrote:
> Electronic can be quite frustrating. > > I put together a circuit for a laser alarm. > > It does not work. > > There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions. > > I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors. > > :-) >
Making something is good and relatively easy, when it doesn't work and you try to find out why is when the real learning begins. Apart from those who are gifted and can learn with no effort I have no doubt the people giving you advice here have gone through the same experience. Just stay calm and double check every thing. Best of luck.
Only failures or mistakes  give a lesson !

AK a écrit le 14/05/2019 à 04:22 :
> Electronic can be quite frustrating. > > I put together a circuit for a laser alarm. > > It does not work. > > There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions. > > I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors. > > :-)
On Mon, 13 May 2019 19:22:56 -0700 (PDT), AK
<scientist77017@gmail.com> wrote:

>Electronic can be quite frustrating. > >I put together a circuit for a laser alarm. > >It does not work. > >There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions. > >I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors. > >:-)
If you look at the schematic and have some idea in your mind on how it is supposed to work... you take your multi-tester and measure a few things like the junction of the resistor and LDR. If it is greater than .6 volts the transistor (assuming you used a bipolar junction transistor) should switch on. Or are you using the 555 schematic? (The trigger for a 555 has to be less than 1/3 the supply voltage) 12V supply the trigger has to dip lower than 4V... Use logic and think about what is supposed to be going on then use the meter to see what is really going on.
On Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at 5:53:47 AM UTC-5, default wrote:
> On Mon, 13 May 2019 19:22:56 -0700 (PDT), AK > <scientist77017@gmail.com> wrote: > > >Electronic can be quite frustrating. > > > >I put together a circuit for a laser alarm. > > > >It does not work. > > > >There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions. > > > >I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors. > > > >:-) > > If you look at the schematic and have some idea in your mind on how it > is supposed to work... you take your multi-tester and measure a few > things like the junction of the resistor and LDR. If it is greater > than .6 volts the transistor (assuming you used a bipolar junction > transistor) should switch on. > > Or are you using the 555 schematic? (The trigger for a 555 has to be > less than 1/3 the supply voltage) 12V supply the trigger has to dip > lower than 4V... > > Use logic and think about what is supposed to be going on then use the > meter to see what is really going on.
How specifically do I measure the junction of the resistor and the LDR? I am using the 555 chip. Andy
On Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at 6:21:59 AM UTC-5, AK wrote:
> On Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at 5:53:47 AM UTC-5, default wrote: > > On Mon, 13 May 2019 19:22:56 -0700 (PDT), AK > > <scientist77017@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > >Electronic can be quite frustrating. > > > > > >I put together a circuit for a laser alarm. > > > > > >It does not work. > > > > > >There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions. > > > > > >I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors. > > > > > >:-) > > > > If you look at the schematic and have some idea in your mind on how it > > is supposed to work... you take your multi-tester and measure a few > > things like the junction of the resistor and LDR. If it is greater > > than .6 volts the transistor (assuming you used a bipolar junction > > transistor) should switch on. > > > > Or are you using the 555 schematic? (The trigger for a 555 has to be > > less than 1/3 the supply voltage) 12V supply the trigger has to dip > > lower than 4V... > > > > Use logic and think about what is supposed to be going on then use the > > meter to see what is really going on. > > How specifically do I measure the junction of the resistor and the LDR? > > I am using the 555 chip. > > Andy
I asked how to specifically do this, but did not get a reply. got a voltmeter to test pin 3&6? when pin 6 is >6v then pin 3 = 0v when pin 6 is <6v then pin 3 = 9v Can someone please show me how? I assume one probe goes to the pin but where does the other go? Thanks.
On 5/13/2019 9:22 PM, AK wrote:
> Electronic can be quite frustrating. > > I put together a circuit for a laser alarm. > > It does not work. > > There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions. > > I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors. > > :-) >
Are you know using the 555 circuit. Mikek
On Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at 7:29:08 AM UTC-5, amdx wrote:
> On 5/13/2019 9:22 PM, AK wrote: > > Electronic can be quite frustrating. > > > > I put together a circuit for a laser alarm. > > > > It does not work. > > > > There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions. > > > > I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors. > > > > :-) > > > > Are you know using the 555 circuit. > Mikek
I do not understand your question. Do you know of any circuit that will detect someone crossing a light path? It does not necessarily have to use a laser. Andy
On Monday, May 13, 2019 at 10:22:59 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
> Electronic can be quite frustrating. > > I put together a circuit for a laser alarm. > > It does not work. > > There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions. > > I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors. > > :-)
Hmm, Well a common pitfall when starting in electronics is to copy all of some circuit. Plug it in and find it doesn't work. A better approach would be to build up one little part of it.. make sure you know how that little part is supposed to work, and confirm it's working as expected. (Or not and go figure out why.) Then add the next little piece. Do you have an oscilloscope?
On Tue, 14 May 2019 04:27:22 -0700 (PDT), AK
<scientist77017@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at 6:21:59 AM UTC-5, AK wrote: >> On Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at 5:53:47 AM UTC-5, default wrote: >> > On Mon, 13 May 2019 19:22:56 -0700 (PDT), AK >> > <scientist77017@gmail.com> wrote: >> > >> > >Electronic can be quite frustrating. >> > > >> > >I put together a circuit for a laser alarm. >> > > >> > >It does not work. >> > > >> > >There is no way to tell if a design will be successful even if you follow the authors exact directions. >> > > >> > >I will keep plugging away and reading Practical Electronics for Inventors. >> > > >> > >:-) >> > >> > If you look at the schematic and have some idea in your mind on how it >> > is supposed to work... you take your multi-tester and measure a few >> > things like the junction of the resistor and LDR. If it is greater >> > than .6 volts the transistor (assuming you used a bipolar junction >> > transistor) should switch on. >> > >> > Or are you using the 555 schematic? (The trigger for a 555 has to be >> > less than 1/3 the supply voltage) 12V supply the trigger has to dip >> > lower than 4V... >> > >> > Use logic and think about what is supposed to be going on then use the >> > meter to see what is really going on. >> >> How specifically do I measure the junction of the resistor and the LDR? >> >> I am using the 555 chip. >> >> Andy > >I asked how to specifically do this, but did not get a reply.
I'm not glued to the PC this morning...
> >got a voltmeter to test pin 3&6? >when pin 6 is >6v then pin 3 = 0v >when pin 6 is <6v then pin 3 = 9v > >Can someone please show me how? > >I assume one probe goes to the pin but where does the other go? >
Measurements are assumed to be to ground or voltage minus unless otherwise stated I don't have the schematic in front of me but I think pin one is ground on the 555?
>Thanks.