Forums

Psu for valves

Started by Peter Percival March 30, 2018
I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall 
begin by building a power supply.  What voltages (at what currents) 
should it supply?  Where may I find circuits?  Naturally, the devices 
used should be easily obtainable.
On 3/30/2018 1:09 PM, Peter Percival wrote:
> I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall > begin by building a power supply.  What voltages (at what currents) > should it supply?  Where may I find circuits?  Naturally, the devices > used should be easily obtainable.
The specifications would depend on what you wanted to supply. I suggest that you read up on the voltages used in such circuits. You could kill yourself.
On 31/03/2018 12:26 PM, Tom Biasi wrote:
> On 3/30/2018 1:09 PM, Peter Percival wrote: >> I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall >> begin by building a power supply.  What voltages (at what currents) >> should it supply?  Where may I find circuits?  Naturally, the devices >> used should be easily obtainable. > The specifications would depend on what you wanted to supply.  I suggest > that you read up on the voltages used in such circuits. You could kill > yourself.
Yeah, study up on the valves then you will know what you want. operating values run from 1.5vdc through 800v as a very loose indication.
On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 18:09:01 +0100, Peter Percival wrote:

> I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall > begin by building a power supply. What voltages (at what currents) > should it supply? Where may I find circuits? Naturally, the devices > used should be easily obtainable.
Naturally? You best course of action is to move your birth-date back 100 years. Failing that, easily obtainable will be a stretch. The voltage, current, will be determined by what it will power. Vacuum tube supplies, if variable generally had a variable transformer on the input to a line frequency power supply. These days you'd be designing and building a switching supply, so I guess the next thing you should ask yourself is if the power supply to be versatile enough for a wide range of applications (variable voltage) or for a single fixed purpose? And does it have to be authentic (use "valves" itself?) To learn about tubes you may look for some vintage electronics company and start with a kit if you can find one, or find some old schematics and breadboard something. good luck
On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 18:09:01 +0100, Peter Percival
<peterxpercival@hotmail.com> wrote:

>I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall >begin by building a power supply. What voltages (at what currents) >should it supply? Where may I find circuits? Naturally, the devices >used should be easily obtainable.
Typically? Probably around 350VDC for the plate supply, 6.3VC and/or 12.6VAC for filaments. As for the naysayers... there are still lots of things better done with toobz than semiconductors. It's always puzzled me that someone hasn't created a bipolar/tube combo part that has the best of both worlds ;-) ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | STV, Queen Creek, AZ 85142 Skype: skypeanalog | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | Understanding is a fountain of life to one who has it, But the instruction of fools is folly. Proverbs 16:22
On 31-3-2018 6:26, Tom Biasi wrote:
> On 3/30/2018 1:09 PM, Peter Percival wrote: >> I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall >> begin by building a power supply. What voltages (at what currents) >> should it supply? Where may I find circuits? Naturally, the devices >> used should be easily obtainable. > The specifications would depend on what you wanted to supply. I suggest > that you read up on the voltages used in such circuits. You could kill > yourself. >
Tubes are fun. In my practice year(1967) the first one was a device to show cosmic rays. It put 20.000 volts on two plates a 1/3 inch apart, less than 10 microseconds after a particle passed through those plates. The ionized trace the particle left behind showed as a flashing trail. Next thing was an experiment control unit to print the count of five Philips counters onto one Kienzle printer in a radiation lab at predefined time intervals. Both projects in tubes, working supply voltages 300 - 500 and 20.000 volts. And I enjoyed them . Worst accident was a set of four electrolytes exploding. (500 V reverse connected is a bit stupid........)
Peter Percival wrote:
> I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall > begin by building a power supply.&nbsp; What voltages (at what currents) > should it supply?&nbsp; Where may I find circuits?&nbsp; Naturally, the devices > used should be easily obtainable.
Also, these: https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/double-triode-valves/1448943/ look interesting! If I don't kill myself I'll fertle around with them too.
Tom Biasi wrote:
> On 3/30/2018 1:09 PM, Peter Percival wrote: >> I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall >> begin by building a power supply.&Acirc;&nbsp; What voltages (at what currents) >> should it supply?&Acirc;&nbsp; Where may I find circuits?&Acirc;&nbsp; Naturally, the devices >> used should be easily obtainable. > The specifications would depend on what you wanted to supply.&Acirc;&nbsp; I suggest > that you read up on the voltages used in such circuits.
Variable up to 800V (looking at https://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/?sra=oss&r=t&searchTerm=thermionic+valves).
> You could kill > yourself.
It can only add to the interest!
default wrote:
> On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 18:09:01 +0100, Peter Percival wrote: > >> I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall >> begin by building a power supply. What voltages (at what currents) >> should it supply? Where may I find circuits? Naturally, the devices >> used should be easily obtainable. > > Naturally? You best course of action is to move your birth-date back 100 > years. Failing that, easily obtainable will be a stretch. > > The voltage, current, will be determined by what it will power. Vacuum > tube supplies, if variable generally had a variable transformer on the > input to a line frequency power supply. These days you'd be designing > and building a switching supply, so I guess the next thing you should ask > yourself is if the power supply to be versatile enough for a wide range > of applications (variable voltage) or for a single fixed purpose? And
Variable.
> does it have to be authentic (use "valves" itself?)
Preferably.
> > To learn about tubes you may look for some vintage electronics company > and start with a kit if you can find one, or find some old schematics and > breadboard something. > > good luck >
On 2018-03-31, Peter Percival <peterxpercival@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Peter Percival wrote: >> I wish to experiment with valves (or tubes, if you prefer) and I shall >> begin by building a power supply.&Acirc;&nbsp; What voltages (at what currents) >> should it supply?&Acirc;&nbsp; Where may I find circuits?&Acirc;&nbsp; Naturally, the devices >> used should be easily obtainable. > > Also, these: > https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/double-triode-valves/1448943/ look > interesting! If I don't kill myself I'll fertle around with them too.
by getting the version facing downwards you save 3.29 pounds :) but the upwards facing one is in stock. 1449016 :) -- This email has not been checked by half-arsed antivirus software