Cell phone electrocution

Started by July 11, 2017
Apparently she reached for her phone while she was in the bath, and it was
charging... but still... ?!

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2017/07/11/teen-dies-from-using-cellphone-while-taking-bath.html
On Tue, 11 Jul 2017 08:29:36 -0700 (PDT), mrdarrett@gmail.com wrote:

>Apparently she reached for her phone while she was in the bath, and it was
charging... but still... ?!
> >http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2017/07/11/teen-dies-from-using-cellphone-while-taking-bath.html
Natural selection ?>:-} ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | STV, Queen Creek, AZ 85142 Skype: skypeanalog | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I'm looking for work... see my website. Thinking outside the box... producing elegant solutions.
On Tuesday, July 11, 2017 at 8:39:14 AM UTC-7, Jim Thompson wrote:
> On Tue, 11 Jul 2017 08:29:36 -0700 (PDT), mrdarrett@gmail.com wrote: > > >Apparently she reached for her phone while she was in the bath, and it was
charging... but still... ?!
> > > >http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2017/07/11/teen-dies-from-using-cellphone-while-taking-bath.html > > Natural selection ?>:-} > > ...Jim Thompson
A bit harsh perhaps. What teenager expects to die just reaching for her cell phone..? Sure, charging a phone in the bathroom isn't recommended, but I thought chargers were better designed than this. Texas only has 110V also... hmm... Michael
On Tue, 11 Jul 2017 09:37:08 -0700, mrdarrett wrote:


> Sure, charging a phone in the bathroom isn't recommended, but I thought > chargers were better designed than this. Texas only has 110V also... > hmm...
110V doesn't sound much (not from where I am where it's 240V anyway) but the water's the killer here. It neutralises the skin's natural resistance and permits lethal levels of current to flow through the body. That was just asking for trouble.
Cursitor Doom wrote:
> mrdarrett wrote: > >> Sure, charging a phone in the bathroom isn't recommended, but I >> thought chargers were better designed than this. Texas only has >> 110V also... hmm... > > 110V doesn't sound much (not from where I am where it's 240V anyway) > but the water's the killer here. It neutralises the skin's natural > resistance and permits lethal levels of current to flow through the > body. > That was just asking for trouble. >
I'm trying to imagine how the 110 ac to the charger is supposed to get to the phone she was holding or dropped into the water. The current in the wire to the phone is 5v DC. Unless something is seriously outawhack. There seem to be details missing of all the reports through the years of people being electrocuted in association with cell phone usage. There have been fake stories, snopes debunkings, and allegedly true reports. This is supposed to be another true report without details from the Lovington NM investigators. -- Mike Easter
On 7/11/2017 11:51 AM, Cursitor Doom wrote:
> On Tue, 11 Jul 2017 09:37:08 -0700, mrdarrett wrote: > > >> Sure, charging a phone in the bathroom isn't recommended, but I thought >> chargers were better designed than this. Texas only has 110V also... >> hmm... > > 110V doesn't sound much (not from where I am where it's 240V anyway) but > the water's the killer here. It neutralises the skin's natural resistance > and permits lethal levels of current to flow through the body. > That was just asking for trouble. > >
I once heard a TV talk show host say stay OFF your cellphone during a lightning storm. I'll take my chances! I also don't talk on my flip phone while it's charging. Mikek
On Tuesday, July 11, 2017 at 10:06:24 AM UTC-7, Mike Easter wrote:
> Cursitor Doom wrote: > > mrdarrett wrote: > > > >> Sure, charging a phone in the bathroom isn't recommended, but I > >> thought chargers were better designed than this. Texas only has > >> 110V also... hmm... > > > > 110V doesn't sound much (not from where I am where it's 240V anyway) > > but the water's the killer here. It neutralises the skin's natural > > resistance and permits lethal levels of current to flow through the > > body. > > That was just asking for trouble. > > > I'm trying to imagine how the 110 ac to the charger is supposed to get > to the phone she was holding or dropped into the water. > > The current in the wire to the phone is 5v DC. Unless something is > seriously outawhack. > > There seem to be details missing of all the reports through the years of > people being electrocuted in association with cell phone usage. There > have been fake stories, snopes debunkings, and allegedly true reports. > This is supposed to be another true report without details from the > Lovington NM investigators. > > > -- > Mike Easter
I'm wondering too (that's why I posted it here). Unless she had an extension cord and accidentally dropped the end of it into her bath, I'm trying to understand the mechanism of shock. While I was in the Philippines, which has 220V, I got shocked just touching the screen of my laptop when it was plugged in. I also got shocked from touching the ground of the headphone jack. It was just an unpleasant sensation, nothing serious. Bad ground, maybe? Michael
mrdarrett@gmail.com wrote:
> While I was in the Philippines, which has 220V, I got shocked just > touching the screen of my laptop when it was plugged in. I also got > shocked from touching the ground of the headphone jack. It was just > an unpleasant sensation, nothing serious. Bad ground, maybe?
Yes to the ground issue. -- Mike Easter
Mike Easter wrote:
> This is supposed to be another true report without details from the > Lovington NM investigators.
Lovington is ~ 50 mi SW of Lubbock TX and is pop ~9000. It is also Lea Co. which is pop 64k. My personal theory so far is that the phone/charger wasn't actually the cause of death/electrocution. The family particularly grandmother has 'decided'/chosen to present it - her theory - that way. -- Mike Easter
Mike Easter wrote:
> My personal theory so far is that the phone/charger wasn't actually the > cause of death/electrocution.
OK, how about this one. She was holding the phone which was plugged into the charger and she was wetly plugging in the charger to the nearby wall outlet which was NOT GFI/ed. OR she was similarly plugging in the charger to a nearby electrical extension cord similarly plugged into a non-GFI wall outlet. I prefer the former above because it can be done one-handed. She would be getting the juice from the mains, pretty much unrelated to the phone except that its function was the purpose of her mission. -- Mike Easter