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Cheap oscilloscope kit

Started by Peabody February 24, 2017
I recently built the JYE Tech DSO-150 Shell oscilloscope kit (#15001K) that I 
got from Banggood for $24 plus a power supply.  These are single-channel, 
low-frequency scopes, but would be useful for things one might do with an 
Arduino or similar microcontroller, such as stepper motors and servos, plus 
of course general audio stuff.  The bandwidth spec is 200 kHz, but I suspect 
the display would be pretty distorted at that frequency.

There are a number of videos posted on Youtube on the build process and 
operation of these scopes, and I posted one on Vimeo showing how it could be 
used to monitor the PWM output of a TI controller.

https://vimeo.com/205487350

Dave Jones of the EEVblog says these kit scopes are garbage, but I think 
that's too harsh.  For low frequency stuff they work fine.  But of course 
they do suffer in comparison to a new $400 digital scope, or even a used 
analog scope, but most people this side of an EE degree just don't need such 
a fancy scope.

Well anyway, for $24, it's a fun project, and it can be useful for 
troubleshooting.  The kit instructions are pretty good.


On Fri, 24 Feb 2017 17:42:13 -0600, Peabody wrote:

> I recently built the JYE Tech DSO-150 Shell oscilloscope kit (#15001K) > that I got from Banggood for $24 plus a power supply. These are > single-channel, low-frequency scopes, but would be useful for things one > might do with an Arduino or similar microcontroller, such as stepper > motors and servos, plus of course general audio stuff. The bandwidth > spec is 200 kHz, but I suspect the display would be pretty distorted at > that frequency. > > There are a number of videos posted on Youtube on the build process and > operation of these scopes, and I posted one on Vimeo showing how it > could be used to monitor the PWM output of a TI controller. > > https://vimeo.com/205487350 > > Dave Jones of the EEVblog says these kit scopes are garbage, but I think > that's too harsh. For low frequency stuff they work fine. But of > course they do suffer in comparison to a new $400 digital scope, or even > a used analog scope, but most people this side of an EE degree just > don't need such a fancy scope. > > Well anyway, for $24, it's a fun project, and it can be useful for > troubleshooting. The kit instructions are pretty good.
Any scope is way better than no scope. Single channel, 200kHz is definitely $25 worth if it's that or no scope. Any two-channel scope with XYZ capabilities is more than twice better than a single-channel scope with XYZ capabilities. More channels are even better yet, but two channels plus an external trigger gets very useful. And yes, four analog channels, 1GHz bandidth, yadda yadda, is better than that, even -- but while there may be a 2 and a 5 involved in the price, there'll be a whole lot of zeros, too. -- www.wescottdesign.com
On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 20:00:46 -0600, Tim Wescott
<tim@seemywebsite.really> wrote:

>On Fri, 24 Feb 2017 17:42:13 -0600, Peabody wrote: > >> I recently built the JYE Tech DSO-150 Shell oscilloscope kit (#15001K) >> that I got from Banggood for $24 plus a power supply. These are >> single-channel, low-frequency scopes, but would be useful for things one >> might do with an Arduino or similar microcontroller, such as stepper >> motors and servos, plus of course general audio stuff. The bandwidth >> spec is 200 kHz, but I suspect the display would be pretty distorted at >> that frequency. >> >> There are a number of videos posted on Youtube on the build process and >> operation of these scopes, and I posted one on Vimeo showing how it >> could be used to monitor the PWM output of a TI controller. >> >> https://vimeo.com/205487350 >> >> Dave Jones of the EEVblog says these kit scopes are garbage, but I think >> that's too harsh. For low frequency stuff they work fine. But of >> course they do suffer in comparison to a new $400 digital scope, or even >> a used analog scope, but most people this side of an EE degree just >> don't need such a fancy scope. >> >> Well anyway, for $24, it's a fun project, and it can be useful for >> troubleshooting. The kit instructions are pretty good. > >Any scope is way better than no scope. Single channel, 200kHz is >definitely $25 worth if it's that or no scope. > >Any two-channel scope with XYZ capabilities is more than twice better >than a single-channel scope with XYZ capabilities. > >More channels are even better yet, but two channels plus an external >trigger gets very useful. > >And yes, four analog channels, 1GHz bandidth, yadda yadda, is better than >that, even -- but while there may be a 2 and a 5 involved in the price, >there'll be a whole lot of zeros, too.
And March is scope month at Keysight ;) Free scopes are even better, except for the taxes. Cheers
On Fri, 24 Feb 2017 17:42:13 -0600, Peabody
<waybackNO584SPAM44@yahoo.com> wrote:

>I recently built the JYE Tech DSO-150 Shell oscilloscope kit (#15001K) that I >got from Banggood for $24 plus a power supply. These are single-channel, >low-frequency scopes, but would be useful for things one might do with an >Arduino or similar microcontroller, such as stepper motors and servos, plus >of course general audio stuff. The bandwidth spec is 200 kHz, but I suspect >the display would be pretty distorted at that frequency. > >There are a number of videos posted on Youtube on the build process and >operation of these scopes, and I posted one on Vimeo showing how it could be >used to monitor the PWM output of a TI controller. > >https://vimeo.com/205487350 > >Dave Jones of the EEVblog says these kit scopes are garbage, but I think >that's too harsh. For low frequency stuff they work fine. But of course >they do suffer in comparison to a new $400 digital scope, or even a used >analog scope, but most people this side of an EE degree just don't need such >a fancy scope. > >Well anyway, for $24, it's a fun project, and it can be useful for >troubleshooting. The kit instructions are pretty good. >
I do not agree. Any tool should be fit for the task. This toy isn't. 24$ is too much to waste. w.
In article <rj45bcdq97rct8bki645p5gg8q068plmnc@4ax.com>, hwabnig@.- 
says...
> > On Fri, 24 Feb 2017 17:42:13 -0600, Peabody > <waybackNO584SPAM44@yahoo.com> wrote: > > >I recently built the JYE Tech DSO-150 Shell oscilloscope kit (#15001K) that I > >got from Banggood for $24 plus a power supply. These are single-channel, > >low-frequency scopes, but would be useful for things one might do with an > >Arduino or similar microcontroller, such as stepper motors and servos, plus > >of course general audio stuff. The bandwidth spec is 200 kHz, but I suspect > >the display would be pretty distorted at that frequency. > > > >There are a number of videos posted on Youtube on the build process and > >operation of these scopes, and I posted one on Vimeo showing how it could be > >used to monitor the PWM output of a TI controller. > > > >https://vimeo.com/205487350 > > > >Dave Jones of the EEVblog says these kit scopes are garbage, but I think > >that's too harsh. For low frequency stuff they work fine. But of course > >they do suffer in comparison to a new $400 digital scope, or even a used > >analog scope, but most people this side of an EE degree just don't need such > >a fancy scope. > > > >Well anyway, for $24, it's a fun project, and it can be useful for > >troubleshooting. The kit instructions are pretty good. > > > I do not agree. > Any tool should be fit for the task. > This toy isn't. > > 24$ is too much to waste. > > w.
It might be. I have not looked at the $ 24 kit. There are some sound card programs that may work as a scope that is just as good. Those $80 scope things that plug into a computer seem to be ok for what they are.
On Sun, 26 Feb 2017, Helmut Wabnig wrote:

> On Fri, 24 Feb 2017 17:42:13 -0600, Peabody > <waybackNO584SPAM44@yahoo.com> wrote: > >> I recently built the JYE Tech DSO-150 Shell oscilloscope kit (#15001K) that I >> got from Banggood for $24 plus a power supply. These are single-channel, >> low-frequency scopes, but would be useful for things one might do with an >> Arduino or similar microcontroller, such as stepper motors and servos, plus >> of course general audio stuff. The bandwidth spec is 200 kHz, but I suspect >> the display would be pretty distorted at that frequency. >> >> There are a number of videos posted on Youtube on the build process and >> operation of these scopes, and I posted one on Vimeo showing how it could be >> used to monitor the PWM output of a TI controller. >> >> https://vimeo.com/205487350 >> >> Dave Jones of the EEVblog says these kit scopes are garbage, but I think >> that's too harsh. For low frequency stuff they work fine. But of course >> they do suffer in comparison to a new $400 digital scope, or even a used >> analog scope, but most people this side of an EE degree just don't need such >> a fancy scope. >> >> Well anyway, for $24, it's a fun project, and it can be useful for >> troubleshooting. The kit instructions are pretty good. >> > I do not agree. > Any tool should be fit for the task. > This toy isn't. > > 24$ is too much to waste. >
I got my first scope when I was about 13, 1973. I paid $5 for it at the local amateur radio club auction. AC coupled, no triggered sweep, bandwidth barely higher than audio. But it gave me a scope to play with, and learn some things about them. When I had access to a better one, I think it was a Tek 317, I gave the five dollar scope to a friend, who got it home on the bus. The thing weighed a "ton", though once you took the case off, it was so much lighter. I suppose now $24 is about the same amount. Lots of people don't know what they would use a scope for, so starting really low gives them a hands on chance to get to know the scope, if nothing else it's cool to speak into a microphone and watch your voice deflect the trace. And this thing has to weigh a whole lot less. Once you play with it, presumably you get a feel, so when you look at something better, you have some knowledge and experience to make a path through there. I have a 545 with some extra plugins, and I barely use it because it is way too big and heavy. But it was free. Michael
On 02/25/2017 09:00 PM, Tim Wescott wrote:
> On Fri, 24 Feb 2017 17:42:13 -0600, Peabody wrote: > >> I recently built the JYE Tech DSO-150 Shell oscilloscope kit (#15001K) >> that I got from Banggood for $24 plus a power supply. These are >> single-channel, low-frequency scopes, but would be useful for things one >> might do with an Arduino or similar microcontroller, such as stepper >> motors and servos, plus of course general audio stuff. The bandwidth >> spec is 200 kHz, but I suspect the display would be pretty distorted at >> that frequency. >> >> There are a number of videos posted on Youtube on the build process and >> operation of these scopes, and I posted one on Vimeo showing how it >> could be used to monitor the PWM output of a TI controller. >> >> https://vimeo.com/205487350 >> >> Dave Jones of the EEVblog says these kit scopes are garbage, but I think >> that's too harsh. For low frequency stuff they work fine. But of >> course they do suffer in comparison to a new $400 digital scope, or even >> a used analog scope, but most people this side of an EE degree just >> don't need such a fancy scope. >> >> Well anyway, for $24, it's a fun project, and it can be useful for >> troubleshooting. The kit instructions are pretty good. > > Any scope is way better than no scope. Single channel, 200kHz is > definitely $25 worth if it's that or no scope. > > Any two-channel scope with XYZ capabilities is more than twice better > than a single-channel scope with XYZ capabilities. > > More channels are even better yet, but two channels plus an external > trigger gets very useful. > > And yes, four analog channels, 1GHz bandidth, yadda yadda, is better than > that, even -- but while there may be a 2 and a 5 involved in the price, > there'll be a whole lot of zeros, too. >
Nah. There are functioning TDS 694Cs going for under a grand--3 GHz, 10 Gs/s simultaneously on 4 channels. (The cheap ones only trigger properly on two channels, but that's OK.) Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net