Forums

Pretend temperature rise

Started by M. Hamed April 3, 2015
Want to see how temperature affects certain electronics components. I know =
I can use freeze spray to drive temperature down. What do I do to raise tem=
perature? Tried soldering iron with a piece of metal attached (so the IC wo=
n't melt) but seems the metal was dissipating the heat so well.
M. Hamed <mhdpublic@gmail.com> wrote:

> Want to see how temperature affects certain electronics components. I know
I can use freeze spray to drive temperature down. What do I do to raise temperature? Tried soldering iron with a piece of metal attached (so the IC won't melt) but seems the metal was dissipating the heat so well. hair dryer? Bye Jack -- Yoda of Borg am I! Assimilated shall you be! Futile resistance is, hmm?
On Fri, 3 Apr 2015 05:19:01 -0700 (PDT), "M. Hamed"
<mhdpublic@gmail.com> wrote:

>Want to see how temperature affects certain electronics components. I know I can use freeze spray to drive temperature down. What do I do to raise temperature? Tried soldering iron with a piece of metal attached (so the IC won't melt) but seems the metal was dissipating the heat so well.
Heat gun. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc picosecond timing laser drivers and controllers jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On Fri, 3 Apr 2015 05:19:01 -0700 (PDT), "M. Hamed"
<mhdpublic@gmail.com> wrote:

>Want to see how temperature affects certain electronics components. I know I can use freeze spray to drive temperature down. What do I do to raise temperature? Tried soldering iron with a piece of metal attached (so the IC won't melt) but seems the metal was dissipating the heat so well.
--- An oven and a good thermometer. John Fields
"John Larkin" <jlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in message 
news:ch9tha598ocfkv1dme27fd9b5rpmr8ls3d@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 3 Apr 2015 05:19:01 -0700 (PDT), "M. Hamed" > <mhdpublic@gmail.com> wrote: > >>Want to see how temperature affects certain electronics components. I know >>I can use freeze spray to drive temperature down. What do I do to raise >>temperature? Tried soldering iron with a piece of metal attached (so the >>IC won't melt) but seems the metal was dissipating the heat so well. > > Heat gun. > >
Also use a funnel with a small outlet to keep the heat in a smaller area. The air dryer will work if you don't want as much heat and don't have a heat gun.
On Friday, April 3, 2015 at 5:19:08 AM UTC-7, M. Hamed wrote:
> Want to see how temperature affects certain electronics components. I know I can use freeze spray to drive temperature down. What do I do to raise temperature?
Hair dryer, heat gun, or in a pinch, maybe a small butane torch. I suppose a small halogen lamp could do it, too, but you'll find light sensitivity that way. I've even heard of liquid nitrogen spray bottles (very light spray, one hopes).
On 4/3/2015 8:19 AM, M. Hamed wrote:
> Want to see how temperature affects certain electronics components. I know I can use freeze spray to drive temperature down. What do I do to raise temperature? Tried soldering iron with a piece of metal attached (so the IC won't melt) but seems the metal was dissipating the heat so well. >
If it's a small area and you don't need huge temperature rise you can use power resistors and a variable supply to heat them. Place the resistor(s) close to the component under test. Ed
I think I should own a heat gun. Harbor Freight has some real cheapos. But I also like the idea of using another hot component nearby!

Thanks for the suggestions!
On Friday, April 3, 2015 at 10:39:58 AM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
> On Fri, 3 Apr 2015 05:19:01 -0700 (PDT), "M. Hamed" > <mhdpublic@gmail.com> wrote: >=20 > >Want to see how temperature affects certain electronics components. I kn=
ow I can use freeze spray to drive temperature down. What do I do to raise = temperature? Tried soldering iron with a piece of metal attached (so the IC= won't melt) but seems the metal was dissipating the heat so well.
>=20 > Heat gun.
Yeah but be careful, you can melt solder with it.=20 George H. =20
>=20 >=20 > --=20 >=20 > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > picosecond timing laser drivers and controllers >=20 > jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com > http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On Tue, 7 Apr 2015, George Herold wrote:

> On Friday, April 3, 2015 at 10:39:58 AM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: >> On Fri, 3 Apr 2015 05:19:01 -0700 (PDT), "M. Hamed" >> <mhdpublic@gmail.com> wrote: >> >>> Want to see how temperature affects certain electronics components. I know I can use freeze spray to drive temperature down. What do I do to raise temperature? Tried soldering iron with a piece of metal attached (so the IC won't melt) but seems the metal was dissipating the heat so well. >> >> Heat gun. > > Yeah but be careful, you can melt solder with it. > > George H.
Yes. Start with a hair dryer. I once bought one small and cheap, never used it for my hair, but it has been real handy for when I needed a small source of heat. I was just using it recently to set some epoxy. But I've never seen it melt solder, so it seems acceptable as a source of heat to find a problem. Michael