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Pin extraction tool

Started by MG October 31, 2013
I have a Kenwood portable radio charger KVC-5A for my fire department
radio. We purchased some new Kenwood radios. The new radios require a
KVC-20L vehicle charger. Kenwood moved one pin on the wire plug to the
charger. Rather than running a new set of cables from the battery to
the charger, I want to move one pin. However, I cannot find the
correct sized pin extraction tool. I purchased a 0.093 pin extraction
tool. But, this Kenwood pin is larger than 0.093. The pins look like
Molex pins, just a bit larger.

Is there a pin extraction tool that might be useful for a pin larger
than 0.093?

We are a volunteer department and carry all our gear in our vehicles.
Having a car charger lets me keep a charged battery available. This is
a lat easier for me to use than carrying batteries back and forth to
the desk charger in the house. 

TIA
On Thu, 31 Oct 2013 00:43:46 -0400, MG <mark.gramlich@oohay.moc>
wrote:

>I have a Kenwood portable radio charger KVC-5A for my fire department >radio. We purchased some new Kenwood radios. The new radios require a >KVC-20L vehicle charger. Kenwood moved one pin on the wire plug to the >charger. Rather than running a new set of cables from the battery to >the charger, I want to move one pin. However, I cannot find the >correct sized pin extraction tool. I purchased a 0.093 pin extraction >tool. But, this Kenwood pin is larger than 0.093. The pins look like >Molex pins, just a bit larger. > >Is there a pin extraction tool that might be useful for a pin larger >than 0.093?
--- If it's not metric, chances are the pins are 0.125" diameter, so you might be able to extract them by slipping a piece of 0.125" diameter thin-wall tubing over the pin, pushing it down to compress the retaining tangs on the pin barrel, and then gently pulling on (while wiggling) the wire on the crimp side of the pin. Something like this: http://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cfm?pid=4374&step=4&showunits=inches&id=84&top_cat=0 But you can probably find what you need at a hobby shop.
On 10/31/2013 12:43 AM, MG wrote:
> I have a Kenwood portable radio charger KVC-5A for my fire department > radio. We purchased some new Kenwood radios. The new radios require a > KVC-20L vehicle charger. Kenwood moved one pin on the wire plug to the > charger. Rather than running a new set of cables from the battery to > the charger, I want to move one pin. However, I cannot find the > correct sized pin extraction tool. I purchased a 0.093 pin extraction > tool. But, this Kenwood pin is larger than 0.093. The pins look like > Molex pins, just a bit larger. > > Is there a pin extraction tool that might be useful for a pin larger > than 0.093? > > We are a volunteer department and carry all our gear in our vehicles. > Having a car charger lets me keep a charged battery available. This is > a lat easier for me to use than carrying batteries back and forth to > the desk charger in the house. > > TIA >
What JF suggested will most likely work fine but for a one time job I have just used a jeweler's screwdriver. Push one side in while pulling the wire to the opposite side. Hopefully you can get the tab to stay outside the catch area while you do the other one. I have done it often so I don't know how difficult it would be for someone who hasn't done it. If you get it out, use the screwdriver to pull out the tabs a little so they latch well upon return. Tom
On Wednesday, October 30, 2013 9:43:46 PM UTC-7, MG wrote:
> I have a Kenwood portable radio charger KVC-5A for my fire department > radio. We purchased some new Kenwood radios. The new radios require a > KVC-20L vehicle charger. Kenwood moved one pin on the wire plug to the > charger. Rather than running a new set of cables from the battery to > the charger, I want to move one pin. However, I cannot find the > correct sized pin extraction tool
Yeah, we've all been there. I've made such tools. Find the smallest clear diameter of the hole in the pin-accepting socket, make a cylinder larger than that diameter, with a slightly (like, 0.003" ) smaller-than-that-diameter hole bored down the center (this is easy iff you have a lathe...).