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Making DC battery Power

Started by Meanie July 4, 2013
I asked a question about batteries and DC power adapter a few weeks ago 
and now I have a small (I hope) dilemma.

I am using the advice of a cordless battery pack and charger to power my 
wife's yarn spinner. I purchased a charger for a tool I already have to 
eliminate buying more accessories. Therefore, I bought this second 
charger >>> 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411868/lightbox/ with 
plans to gut it and wire the two contacts for power, which you'll see 
here >>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411570/lightbox/

The general idea was to remove the wires to the contacts and solder an 
adapter cord which fits the insert of the spinner, thus, direct power. 
Upon disassembling the charger, I quickly discovered those contacts are 
soldered to the circuit board, but also, I was thinking about those 
three other prongs which the battery makes contact with, which you'll 
see in these photos >>> 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411700/lightbox/ 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411794/lightbox/  You'll 
see the two straight-up prongs to the left and the three loop prongs to 
the right. My plan of direct wire contact is not what I expected and now 
I'm uncertain how to do this.

Anyone care to offer advice how to achieve my objective?

Thank you
On Thu, 04 Jul 2013 21:53:52 -0400, Meanie <meanie.brat@gmail.com>
wrote:

>I asked a question about batteries and DC power adapter a few weeks ago >and now I have a small (I hope) dilemma. > >I am using the advice of a cordless battery pack and charger to power my >wife's yarn spinner. I purchased a charger for a tool I already have to >eliminate buying more accessories. Therefore, I bought this second >charger >>> >http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411868/lightbox/ with >plans to gut it and wire the two contacts for power, which you'll see >here >>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411570/lightbox/ > >The general idea was to remove the wires to the contacts and solder an >adapter cord which fits the insert of the spinner, thus, direct power. >Upon disassembling the charger, I quickly discovered those contacts are >soldered to the circuit board, but also, I was thinking about those >three other prongs which the battery makes contact with, which you'll >see in these photos >>> >http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411700/lightbox/ >http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411794/lightbox/ You'll >see the two straight-up prongs to the left and the three loop prongs to >the right. My plan of direct wire contact is not what I expected and now >I'm uncertain how to do this. > >Anyone care to offer advice how to achieve my objective? > >Thank you
I do not understand the problem. Soldering two wires cannot be that difficult. Of course you need tools like soldering iron, 40/60 solder, and flux. w.
On Thu, 04 Jul 2013 21:53:52 -0400, Meanie <meanie.brat@gmail.com>
wrote:

>I asked a question about batteries and DC power adapter a few weeks ago >and now I have a small (I hope) dilemma. > >I am using the advice of a cordless battery pack and charger to power my >wife's yarn spinner. I purchased a charger for a tool I already have to >eliminate buying more accessories. Therefore, I bought this second >charger >>> >http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411868/lightbox/ with >plans to gut it and wire the two contacts for power, which you'll see >here >>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411570/lightbox/ > >The general idea was to remove the wires to the contacts and solder an >adapter cord which fits the insert of the spinner, thus, direct power. >Upon disassembling the charger, I quickly discovered those contacts are >soldered to the circuit board, but also, I was thinking about those >three other prongs which the battery makes contact with, which you'll >see in these photos >>> >http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411700/lightbox/ >http://www.flickr.com/photos/18223943@N06/9213411794/lightbox/ You'll >see the two straight-up prongs to the left and the three loop prongs to >the right. My plan of direct wire contact is not what I expected and now >I'm uncertain how to do this. > >Anyone care to offer advice how to achieve my objective? > >Thank you
What's the problem? You expected to see two wires and see three instead? When charging batteries - particularly high rate of charge ones (quick charge) OR ones likely to explode if over-heated/over-charged, they will add a temperature sensor to the battery pack to prevent catastrophic failures. The temperature sensor might need to be present for the charger to work - or some suitable circuit or component substituted to "fool" it into thinking that it is safe to deliver a charge to the battery. Why didn't you just buy a surplus "wall wart" or some other (laptop for example) power supply? They cost very little and aren't too picky about what they power (providing they can provide the power, volts-amps you need to turn the spinner). The switching regulated ones are very efficient and often include over current protection so if your wife manually stalls the spinner it will just stop without damaging the supply. Lots of on-line surplus electronics for sale....
Allow me to elaborate on my objective.


The wife uses an electric yarn spinner, which obviously, already has a 
power cord w/transformer(120v to 12v). She wants the option of using the 
spinner without the cord when there isn't an outlet available (ex: 
Outside). Therefore, I decided to make her a battery powered adapter and 
choose to use a 12v battery from one of my cordless tools. I purchased 
an extra charging pack, which you saw in the photo. My plan is to gut 
the inner components to disable the charging feature and simply use the 
charging station as a battery holder and power supply. Thus, I need 
those prongs to remain in the case after I've removed the circuit board. 
Obviously, I no longer need the circuit board because I don't need it to 
charge. What I need is a case with the prongs attached to it so I can 
insert the battery for connection. Since the prongs are part of the 
circuit board, they won't be available on the case for me to solder 
wires for the spinner. The only thing I can currently think of is to 
remove the prongs from the circuit board and adhere them on the case. 
Then I would solder two wires from a connector which fits her spinner 
and I'm good to go. Though now, after viewing the three loop prongs, I'm 
uncertain of their function and how I would wire them along with the 
other two straight prongs.

I hope I explained it better.

Thank you
Helmut Wabnig wrote:
> > I do not understand the problem. > Soldering two wires cannot be that difficult. > Of course you need tools like soldering iron, 40/60 solder, and flux.
60/40 The tin is listed first. :)
On Fri, 5 Jul 2013, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

> > Helmut Wabnig wrote: >> >> I do not understand the problem. >> Soldering two wires cannot be that difficult. >> Of course you need tools like soldering iron, 40/60 solder, and flux. > > > 60/40 The tin is listed first. :) >
I think I got some of that 40/60 soler. Decades back, I got some solder that sure didn't work, and I soon tossed it. I have no idea if it was somehow a bad batch, or I accidentally bought the wrong kind, it's been so long. But it sure wouldn't solder electronics properly. Michael
On Fri, 5 Jul 2013 09:52:51 -0400, Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> wrote:

>On Fri, 5 Jul 2013, Michael A. Terrell wrote: > >> >> Helmut Wabnig wrote: >>> >>> I do not understand the problem. >>> Soldering two wires cannot be that difficult. >>> Of course you need tools like soldering iron, 40/60 solder, and flux. >> >> >> 60/40 The tin is listed first. :) >> >I think I got some of that 40/60 soler. Decades back, I got some solder >that sure didn't work, and I soon tossed it. I have no idea if it was >somehow a bad batch, or I accidentally bought the wrong kind, it's been so >long. But it sure wouldn't solder electronics properly. >
Possibly high temperature solder? At my workplace I had the first place after the entry door. Every now and then somebody would come in and ask for a piece of solder. Then I found some solder which looked almost like normal solder but would melt some 20 degrees higher. Friendly and helpful as I am I generously provided the collegs with what they needed. Soon that ended. w.
On Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:48:52 -0400, Meanie <meanie.brat@gmail.com>
wrote:

>Allow me to elaborate on my objective. > > >The wife uses an electric yarn spinner, which obviously, already has a >power cord w/transformer(120v to 12v). She wants the option of using the >spinner without the cord when there isn't an outlet available (ex: >Outside). Therefore, I decided to make her a battery powered adapter and >choose to use a 12v battery from one of my cordless tools. I purchased >an extra charging pack, which you saw in the photo. My plan is to gut >the inner components to disable the charging feature and simply use the >charging station as a battery holder and power supply. Thus, I need >those prongs to remain in the case after I've removed the circuit board. >Obviously, I no longer need the circuit board because I don't need it to >charge. What I need is a case with the prongs attached to it so I can >insert the battery for connection. Since the prongs are part of the >circuit board, they won't be available on the case for me to solder >wires for the spinner. The only thing I can currently think of is to >remove the prongs from the circuit board and adhere them on the case. >Then I would solder two wires from a connector which fits her spinner >and I'm good to go. Though now, after viewing the three loop prongs, I'm >uncertain of their function and how I would wire them along with the >other two straight prongs. > >I hope I explained it better. >
As I understand it you will charge the battery in another charger. You want to use a surplus charger as battery holder only. You don't have to disable the charging feature. Just leave it on its place and add the two wires to the battery contacts, The idling charging circuitry will not take much power off the battery. Maybe one LED will light, cut that off. w.
On 7/5/2013 4:18 PM, Helmut Wabnig wrote:
> On Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:48:52 -0400, Meanie <meanie.brat@gmail.com> > wrote: > >> Allow me to elaborate on my objective. >> >> >> The wife uses an electric yarn spinner, which obviously, already has a >> power cord w/transformer(120v to 12v). She wants the option of using the >> spinner without the cord when there isn't an outlet available (ex: >> Outside). Therefore, I decided to make her a battery powered adapter and >> choose to use a 12v battery from one of my cordless tools. I purchased >> an extra charging pack, which you saw in the photo. My plan is to gut >> the inner components to disable the charging feature and simply use the >> charging station as a battery holder and power supply. Thus, I need >> those prongs to remain in the case after I've removed the circuit board. >> Obviously, I no longer need the circuit board because I don't need it to >> charge. What I need is a case with the prongs attached to it so I can >> insert the battery for connection. Since the prongs are part of the >> circuit board, they won't be available on the case for me to solder >> wires for the spinner. The only thing I can currently think of is to >> remove the prongs from the circuit board and adhere them on the case. >> Then I would solder two wires from a connector which fits her spinner >> and I'm good to go. Though now, after viewing the three loop prongs, I'm >> uncertain of their function and how I would wire them along with the >> other two straight prongs. >> >> I hope I explained it better. >> > As I understand it you will charge the battery in another charger. >
That is correct.
> You want to use a surplus charger as battery holder only.
Correct and supply the power to the spinner.
> You don't have to disable the charging feature. > Just leave it on its place and add the two wires > to the battery contacts, > The idling charging circuitry will not take much power > off the battery. Maybe one LED will light, cut that off. >
Is it ok to solder the two wires on the underside of the circuit board where the prongs/contacts are? I assume it's ok to cut the power cord also? Thank you
On Fri, 05 Jul 2013 16:37:51 -0400, Meanie <meanie.brat@gmail.com>
wrote:

>On 7/5/2013 4:18 PM, Helmut Wabnig wrote: >> On Fri, 05 Jul 2013 07:48:52 -0400, Meanie <meanie.brat@gmail.com> >> wrote: >> >>> Allow me to elaborate on my objective. >>> >>> >>> The wife uses an electric yarn spinner, which obviously, already has a >>> power cord w/transformer(120v to 12v). She wants the option of using the >>> spinner without the cord when there isn't an outlet available (ex: >>> Outside). Therefore, I decided to make her a battery powered adapter and >>> choose to use a 12v battery from one of my cordless tools. I purchased >>> an extra charging pack, which you saw in the photo. My plan is to gut >>> the inner components to disable the charging feature and simply use the >>> charging station as a battery holder and power supply. Thus, I need >>> those prongs to remain in the case after I've removed the circuit board. >>> Obviously, I no longer need the circuit board because I don't need it to >>> charge. What I need is a case with the prongs attached to it so I can >>> insert the battery for connection. Since the prongs are part of the >>> circuit board, they won't be available on the case for me to solder >>> wires for the spinner. The only thing I can currently think of is to >>> remove the prongs from the circuit board and adhere them on the case. >>> Then I would solder two wires from a connector which fits her spinner >>> and I'm good to go. Though now, after viewing the three loop prongs, I'm >>> uncertain of their function and how I would wire them along with the >>> other two straight prongs. >>> >>> I hope I explained it better. >>> >> As I understand it you will charge the battery in another charger. >> >That is correct. > >> You want to use a surplus charger as battery holder only. > >Correct and supply the power to the spinner.
--- It's probably a little late for this, but why didn't you just get some spade connectors to connect the battery to a cable with the other end wired to connect to the spinner? -- JF