Forums

Open source AVR simulator.

Started by Ian Field May 15, 2013
Is there such a thing as open source AVR simulator anywhere?

Some kind of development environment that I can experiment writing & running 
code without going near a soldering iron.

Thanks. 

On 5/15/13 11:19 AM, Ian Field wrote:
> Is there such a thing as open source AVR simulator anywhere? > > Some kind of development environment that I can experiment writing & > running code without going near a soldering iron. > > Thanks.
Well, you can skip the iron if you just use an Arduino. I think AVR studio comes with a debugger, I don't know about a simulator though.

"Daniel Pitts" <newsgroup.nospam@virtualinfinity.net> wrote in message 
news:5CRkt.6077$Bx4.2698@newsfe29.iad...
> On 5/15/13 11:19 AM, Ian Field wrote: >> Is there such a thing as open source AVR simulator anywhere? >> >> Some kind of development environment that I can experiment writing & >> running code without going near a soldering iron. >> >> Thanks. > Well, you can skip the iron if you just use an Arduino. > > I think AVR studio comes with a debugger, I don't know about a simulator > though.
Do you think I'd have better luck finding one that runs on a Linux box? I have an extra PC gathering dust that only needs the very basic hardware putting in it. The AVR seems to have the longest heritage with its 8051 ancestry, but the PIC seems to have a wider scope of support these days. Do you know where to find a reasonably concise overview of the 2 architectures? Maybe I should take a closer look at the relative merits before deciding which way to go. TBH; the old "conventional" architecture seems to make more sense to me! Thanks.
On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 07:19:22PM +0100, Ian Field wrote:
> Is there such a thing as open source AVR simulator anywhere? > > Some kind of development environment that I can experiment writing & > running code without going near a soldering iron.
There's a program called simulavr which seems fairly complete, although I have not yet got around to compiling it. To compile under Windows you need the MingW environment, which presumably includes the GNU compiler chain. Someone probably has a pre-compiled executable for download somewhere if that's what you need. Regards, Uncle Steve -- There should be a special word in the English language to identify people who create problems and then turn around and offer up their own tailor-made bogus non-solutions designed to completely avoid the root causes of the situation under consideration. 'Traitor' might be a good choice, but lacks the requisite specificity. One of the problems with contemporary English is it lacks many such words that would otherwise categorically identify certain kinds of person, place, or thing -- making it difficult or impossible to think analytically about such objects. These shortcomings of the English lexicon are representative of Orwellian linguistics at work in the real world.

"Uncle Steve" <stevet810@gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:8a2598917daa40e-26cc6@gmail.com...
> On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 07:19:22PM +0100, Ian Field wrote: >> Is there such a thing as open source AVR simulator anywhere? >> >> Some kind of development environment that I can experiment writing & >> running code without going near a soldering iron. > > There's a program called simulavr which seems fairly complete, > although I have not yet got around to compiling it. To compile under > Windows you need the MingW environment, which presumably includes the > GNU compiler chain. Someone probably has a pre-compiled executable > for download somewhere if that's what you need.
If its a natively Linux app - I could probably live with building up a Linux box for it (eventually).
On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 10:44:38PM +0100, Ian Field wrote:
> > > "Uncle Steve" <stevet810@gmail.com> wrote in message > news:8a2598917daa40e-26cc6@gmail.com... > >On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 07:19:22PM +0100, Ian Field wrote: > >>Is there such a thing as open source AVR simulator anywhere? > >> > >>Some kind of development environment that I can experiment writing & > >>running code without going near a soldering iron. > > > >There's a program called simulavr which seems fairly complete, > >although I have not yet got around to compiling it. To compile under > >Windows you need the MingW environment, which presumably includes the > >GNU compiler chain. Someone probably has a pre-compiled executable > >for download somewhere if that's what you need. > > > If its a natively Linux app - I could probably live with building up a > Linux box for it (eventually).
It appears to be a fairly standard autoconf configured program, most likely later ported to run under Windows. Regards, Uncle Steve -- There should be a special word in the English language to identify people who create problems and then turn around and offer up their own tailor-made bogus non-solutions designed to completely avoid the root causes of the situation under consideration. 'Traitor' might be a good choice, but lacks the requisite specificity. One of the problems with contemporary English is it lacks many such words that would otherwise categorically identify certain kinds of person, place, or thing -- making it difficult or impossible to think analytically about such objects. These shortcomings of the English lexicon are representative of Orwellian linguistics at work in the real world.
On 2013-05-15, Ian Field <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote:
> Is there such a thing as open source AVR simulator anywhere?
Yeah, EG: simulavr, iirc it can plug into ngspice. -- &#9858;&#9859; 100% natural --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: news@netfront.net ---
On 2013-05-15, Ian Field <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote:


> Do you think I'd have better luck finding one that runs on a Linux box?
yeah, install debian, the package is called simulavr. -- &#9858;&#9859; 100% natural --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: news@netfront.net ---
On 2013-05-15, Uncle Steve <stevet810@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 10:44:38PM +0100, Ian Field wrote: >> >> >> "Uncle Steve" <stevet810@gmail.com> wrote in message >> news:8a2598917daa40e-26cc6@gmail.com... >> >On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 07:19:22PM +0100, Ian Field wrote: >> >>Is there such a thing as open source AVR simulator anywhere? >> >> >> >>Some kind of development environment that I can experiment writing & >> >>running code without going near a soldering iron. >> > >> >There's a program called simulavr which seems fairly complete, >> >although I have not yet got around to compiling it. To compile under >> >Windows you need the MingW environment, which presumably includes the >> >GNU compiler chain. Someone probably has a pre-compiled executable >> >for download somewhere if that's what you need. >> >> >> If its a natively Linux app - I could probably live with building up a >> Linux box for it (eventually). > > It appears to be a fairly standard autoconf configured program, most > likely later ported to run under Windows.
(info from debian) --\ Depends (4) --- dpkg (>= 1.15.4) | install-info --- libc6 (>= 2.7) --- libncurses5 (>= 5.5-5~) --- libtinfo5 --\ Recommends (3) --- binutils-avr (UNSATISFIED) --- gcc-avr (UNSATISFIED) --- xterm ncurses, tinfo, xterm. looks like a CUI program, so should compile fairly easily under mingw. modulo gratuitous use of fork() or other non-windows features. -- &#9858;&#9859; 100% natural --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: news@netfront.net ---
On Wed, 15 May 2013 21:50:39 +0100, Ian Field wrote:

> "Daniel Pitts" <newsgroup.nospam@virtualinfinity.net> wrote in message > news:5CRkt.6077$Bx4.2698@newsfe29.iad... >> On 5/15/13 11:19 AM, Ian Field wrote: >>> Is there such a thing as open source AVR simulator anywhere? >>> >>> Some kind of development environment that I can experiment writing & >>> running code without going near a soldering iron. >>> >>> Thanks. >> Well, you can skip the iron if you just use an Arduino. >> >> I think AVR studio comes with a debugger, I don't know about a >> simulator though. > > Do you think I'd have better luck finding one that runs on a Linux box? > > I have an extra PC gathering dust that only needs the very basic > hardware putting in it. > > The AVR seems to have the longest heritage with its 8051 ancestry, but > the PIC seems to have a wider scope of support these days. > > Do you know where to find a reasonably concise overview of the 2 > architectures? > > Maybe I should take a closer look at the relative merits before deciding > which way to go. > > TBH; the old "conventional" architecture seems to make more sense to me!
I don't see much 8051 in the AVR. When I have my software-writing hat on, I loooove the AVR. When I have my parts-procurement hat on, the PIC looks better (although that's based on old information -- Atmel used to be bad at delivery but has reputedly gotten better). When I have my hardware-designing hat on, I loooove the PIC. Get an Arduino and a debugging environment. Nothing says "embedded" like a blinking light. Better yet, particularly if you like Linux, chuck the 8-bit stuff and find a nice Cortex M0 development board. -- My liberal friends think I'm a conservative kook. My conservative friends think I'm a liberal kook. Why am I not happy that they have found common ground? Tim Wescott, Communications, Control, Circuits & Software http://www.wescottdesign.com