Forums

Socket or solder?

Started by Frederick Williams February 18, 2013
How would one make electrical connections to this:
http://www.tube-amps.net/images/Hashimoto_Prods/H-30-5S_800.jpg?  Is
there a socket, or would wires be soldered directly to the pins?
-- 
When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by 
this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him.
Jonathan Swift: Thoughts on Various Subjects, Moral and Diverting
On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 19:13:39 +0000, Frederick Williams wrote:

> How would one make electrical connections to this: > http://www.tube-amps.net/images/Hashimoto_Prods/H-30-5S_800.jpg? Is > there a socket, or would wires be soldered directly to the pins?
Transformers are generally soldered in, and often last for the life of an amplifier. Tubes are socketed because they are less reliable than a socket, and often must be replaced during the life of an amplifier. Sockets themselves become a potential failure point, and they cost money. So why add expense and diminish reliability? -- My liberal friends think I'm a conservative kook. My conservative friends think I'm a liberal kook. Why am I not happy that they have found common ground? Tim Wescott, Communications, Control, Circuits & Software http://www.wescottdesign.com
On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 14:19:02 -0600, Tim Wescott <tim@seemywebsite.com> wrote:

>On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 19:13:39 +0000, Frederick Williams wrote: > >> How would one make electrical connections to this: >> http://www.tube-amps.net/images/Hashimoto_Prods/H-30-5S_800.jpg? Is >> there a socket, or would wires be soldered directly to the pins? > >Transformers are generally soldered in, and often last for the life of an >amplifier. Tubes are socketed because they are less reliable than a >socket, and often must be replaced during the life of an amplifier. >Sockets themselves become a potential failure point, and they cost >money. So why add expense and diminish reliability?
If you solder to the pins on the outside, the solder joints on the wires inside may sprong loose. I've seen that happen (for real transformers, not this audio stuff.) I wonder what that thing costs. -- John Larkin Highland Technology Inc www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com Precision electronic instrumentation Picosecond-resolution Digital Delay and Pulse generators Custom timing and laser controllers Photonics and fiberoptic TTL data links VME analog, thermocouple, LVDT, synchro, tachometer Multichannel arbitrary waveform generators
John Larkin wrote:
> > On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 14:19:02 -0600, Tim Wescott <tim@seemywebsite.com> wrote: > > >On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 19:13:39 +0000, Frederick Williams wrote: > > > >> How would one make electrical connections to this: > >> http://www.tube-amps.net/images/Hashimoto_Prods/H-30-5S_800.jpg? Is > >> there a socket, or would wires be soldered directly to the pins? > > > >Transformers are generally soldered in, and often last for the life of an > >amplifier. Tubes are socketed because they are less reliable than a > >socket, and often must be replaced during the life of an amplifier. > >Sockets themselves become a potential failure point, and they cost > >money. So why add expense and diminish reliability? > > If you solder to the pins on the outside, the solder joints on the wires inside > may sprong loose.
That possibility has been mentioned.
> I've seen that happen (for real transformers, not this audio > stuff.) > > I wonder what that thing costs.
718 US dollars for a pair apparently! -- When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. Jonathan Swift: Thoughts on Various Subjects, Moral and Diverting
On 2013-02-18, Frederick Williams <freddywilliams@btinternet.com> wrote:
> How would one make electrical connections to this: > http://www.tube-amps.net/images/Hashimoto_Prods/H-30-5S_800.jpg? Is > there a socket, or would wires be soldered directly to the pins?
It doesn't look like the kind of thing designed to be soldered to, but the terminals don't look real friendly either - bullet quick-connects? Are those screws in the corners to mount it with? -- &#9858;&#9859; 100% natural
Jasen Betts wrote:
> > On 2013-02-18, Frederick Williams <freddywilliams@btinternet.com> wrote: > > How would one make electrical connections to this: > > http://www.tube-amps.net/images/Hashimoto_Prods/H-30-5S_800.jpg? Is > > there a socket, or would wires be soldered directly to the pins? > > It doesn't look like the kind of thing designed to be soldered to,
That's what I thought.
> but > the terminals don't look real friendly either - bullet quick-connects? > Are those screws in the corners to mount it with?
I don't have one myself. -- When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. Jonathan Swift: Thoughts on Various Subjects, Moral and Diverting
On Monday, February 18, 2013 12:19:02 PM UTC-8, Tim Wescott wrote:

> Transformers are generally soldered in, and often last for the life of an > amplifier. Tubes are socketed because they are less reliable than a > socket, and often must be replaced during the life of an amplifier. > Sockets themselves become a potential failure point, and they cost > money. So why add expense and diminish reliability?
Transformers are often chassis-mounted, because they're heavy. So, to connect the transformer to a printed wiring board, it's VERY common for a PWB to have a socket for the transformer connection. The flexible leadwires from the transformer are soldered to the solid (inflexible) windings, though. Transformers (and other inductors) get a bad reputation partly because it's difficult to put them through 'standard' pick/place/solder operations.
On Tue, 19 Feb 2013 08:02:43 +0000, Jasen Betts wrote:

> On 2013-02-18, Frederick Williams <freddywilliams@btinternet.com> wrote: >> How would one make electrical connections to this: >> http://www.tube-amps.net/images/Hashimoto_Prods/H-30-5S_800.jpg? Is >> there a socket, or would wires be soldered directly to the pins? > > It doesn't look like the kind of thing designed to be soldered to, but > the terminals don't look real friendly either - bullet quick-connects? > Are those screws in the corners to mount it with?
I suppose the correct answer to the question (which should have sprung out at me but did not), is "however the manufacturer intends". -- My liberal friends think I'm a conservative kook. My conservative friends think I'm a liberal kook. Why am I not happy that they have found common ground? Tim Wescott, Communications, Control, Circuits & Software http://www.wescottdesign.com
Tim Wescott wrote:
> > On Tue, 19 Feb 2013 08:02:43 +0000, Jasen Betts wrote: > > > On 2013-02-18, Frederick Williams <freddywilliams@btinternet.com> wrote: > >> How would one make electrical connections to this: > >> http://www.tube-amps.net/images/Hashimoto_Prods/H-30-5S_800.jpg? Is > >> there a socket, or would wires be soldered directly to the pins? > > > > It doesn't look like the kind of thing designed to be soldered to, but > > the terminals don't look real friendly either - bullet quick-connects? > > Are those screws in the corners to mount it with? > > I suppose the correct answer to the question (which should have sprung > out at me but did not), is "however the manufacturer intends".
And I expect seb to know just what the manufacturer intends! -- When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. Jonathan Swift: Thoughts on Various Subjects, Moral and Diverting
On Tue, 19 Feb 2013 12:03:03 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Monday, February 18, 2013 12:19:02 PM UTC-8, Tim Wescott wrote: > >> Transformers are generally soldered in, and often last for the life of an >> amplifier. Tubes are socketed because they are less reliable than a >> socket, and often must be replaced during the life of an amplifier. >> Sockets themselves become a potential failure point, and they cost >> money. So why add expense and diminish reliability? > >Transformers are often chassis-mounted, because they're heavy. >So, to connect the transformer to a printed wiring board, it's >VERY common for a PWB to have a socket for the transformer >connection. The flexible leadwires from the transformer >are soldered to the solid (inflexible) windings, though. > >Transformers (and other inductors) get a bad reputation partly >because it's difficult to put them through 'standard' pick/place/solder >operations.
Pick-and-place is easy for transformers, if you have the right gear. https://dl.dropbox.com/u/53724080/PP5.JPG -- John Larkin Highland Technology Inc www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com Precision electronic instrumentation Picosecond-resolution Digital Delay and Pulse generators Custom timing and laser controllers Photonics and fiberoptic TTL data links VME analog, thermocouple, LVDT, synchro, tachometer Multichannel arbitrary waveform generators