Forums

Where Is the Laser Sinking the Heat?

Started by Bret Cahill February 2, 2013
If anything goes wrong with a non air breathing high energy density
battery or any high energy density energy storage material it simply
becomes an explosive and there hasn't been any clever way to get
around this fact.  A tiny flaw releases some energy and that area
immediately heats up to 5,000 degrees vaporizing anything in its way
until there's nothing left but a crater.

If the entire battery could be monitored for eruptions of heat,
however, maybe a laser could quell the problem in time:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130130101932.htm

The question is, how and where is the laser dumping the heat?

If it could instantly dump a billion joules 50 meters above the motor
vehicle it might be ok.


Bret Cahill


On 2013-02-02, Bret Cahill <BretCahill@peoplepc.com> wrote:
> If anything goes wrong with a non air breathing high energy density > battery or any high energy density energy storage material it simply > becomes an explosive and there hasn't been any clever way to get > around this fact. A tiny flaw releases some energy and that area > immediately heats up to 5,000 degrees vaporizing anything in its way > until there's nothing left but a crater. > > If the entire battery could be monitored for eruptions of heat, > however, maybe a laser could quell the problem in time:
unlikely
> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130130101932.htm > > The question is, how and where is the laser dumping the heat?
the semiconductor must be dumping it as infrared. -- &#9858;&#9859; 100% natural
> If anything goes wrong with a non air breathing high energy density > battery or any high energy density energy storage material it simply > becomes an explosive and there hasn't been any clever way to get > around this fact. =A0A tiny flaw releases some energy and that area > immediately heats up to 5,000 degrees vaporizing anything in its way > until there's nothing left but a crater. > > If the entire battery could be monitored for eruptions of heat, > however, maybe a laser could quell the problem in time: > > http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130130101932.htm > > The question is, how and where is the laser dumping the heat? > > If it could instantly dump a billion joules 50 meters above the motor > vehicle it might be ok.
Solar PV will soon drop to 35 cents/watt. http://cleantechnica.com/2013/01/30/high-efficiency-solar-panels-using-holo= graphic-film/ The hold up is the battery. Bret Cahill
> > If anything goes wrong with a non air breathing high energy density > > battery or any high energy density energy storage material it simply > > becomes an explosive and there hasn't been any clever way to get > > around this fact. =A0A tiny flaw releases some energy and that area > > immediately heats up to 5,000 degrees vaporizing anything in its way > > until there's nothing left but a crater. > > > If the entire battery could be monitored for eruptions of heat, > > however, maybe a laser could quell the problem in time: > > unlikely
Even if it did work it would certainly be easy for a terrorist to disable. A suicide bomber wouldn't really care if it was booby trapped with warning labels.
> >http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130130101932.htm > > > The question is, how and where is the laser dumping the heat? > > the semiconductor must be dumping it as infrared.
Then the battery would need to be on the to or outside of the vehicle and the vehicle would need to stay out of collisions. The only plausible high density energy storage must be air breathing, i.e., a fuel cell, metal air, etc. Bret Cahill
On Sat, 02 Feb 2013 08:18:41 -0800, Bret Cahill wrote in
9bd704b9-2668-46bb-9445-3cd956931fbc@px4g2000pbc.googlegroups.com :

> The question is, how and where is the laser dumping the heat?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_cooling might be helpful.
> > The question is, how and where is the laser dumping the heat? > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_coolingmight be helpful.
"Thus if one applies light from two opposite directions, the atoms will always scatter more photons from the laser beam pointing opposite to their direction of motion. In each scattering event the atom loses a momentum equal to the momentum of the photon." Even if a laser could quell problems in a lab for short periods of time, you wouldn't want a super cap or non air breathing super battery out on the street as a consumer item. Bret Cahill