Forums

Arduino choices

Started by Ivan Vegvary October 23, 2012
Want to buy an Arduino.  Too many choices that I don't understand.  Prices =
all seem to be nearly the same.

Arduino will be used by a small group of high school students to build a "p=
ick and place" robotics arm.  School has a 3D printer and a laser cutter.  =
We also have lots of motors and servos from VEX robotics kits.  We could us=
e the VEX controllers but I would like the students to learn an "open sourc=
e" platform.  Process will included sketching, designing parts using Auto C=
ad Inventor, printing the base, arms, knuckles, motor supports, gears, etc.=
 with the 3D printers, winding a coil to create an electro-magnet as the pi=
ck up.  Goal will be to autonomously and with joy sticks pick and place sma=
ll metal discs.

Anyway, could some of you point me as to what flavor or version of Arduino =
to purchase.  Also what tutorials (books) would you recommend.

Thanks,=20
Ivan Vegvary
On 23/10/2012 11:46 AM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
> Want to buy an Arduino. Too many choices that I don't understand. Prices all seem to be nearly the same. > > Arduino will be used by a small group of high school students to build a "pick and place" robotics arm. School has a 3D printer and a laser cutter. We also have lots of motors and servos from VEX robotics kits. We could use the VEX controllers but I would like the students to learn an "open source" platform. Process will included sketching, designing parts using Auto Cad Inventor, printing the base, arms, knuckles, motor supports, gears, etc. with the 3D printers, winding a coil to create an electro-magnet as the pick up. Goal will be to autonomously and with joy sticks pick and place small metal discs. > > Anyway, could some of you point me as to what flavor or version of Arduino to purchase. Also what tutorials (books) would you recommend. > > Thanks, > Ivan Vegvary >
You should be able to get all the info you need from the Arduino Web site. It might be the most interesting for the students to build their own "Arduino" by mounting an Atmel Mega 328 chip and xtal on some vero board or similar (Look for "bare bones Arduino"). If you will need a lot of inputs and outputs perhaps the Atmel Mega 1280 would be a better choice but it comes as a surface mount chip so it's more practical to buy those as a completed board. I find the "Arduino Cookbook" by Argolis to cover all one might need to get started and more !! Cheers ........ Rheilly P
On Tuesday, October 23, 2012 5:46:51 AM UTC+2, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
> > Anyway, could some of you point me as to what flavor or version of > Arduino to purchase. Also what tutorials (books) would you recommend. >
Short answer: Arduino Uno You only really need an Arduino Mega if you're going to write big programs. For everything else the Uno is better - more support, more shields, more code... The extra I/O pins on the Mega aren't as big an advantage as they might appear, it's trivial to add more I/O to an Uno via shift registers, etc. The mega is also very difficult to repair if you blow the chip by connecting up something you shouldn't. With an Uno it takes a few seconds to drop in a $3 replacement. The best place for Arduino info is the Arduino web site.
On 10/23/2012 05:31 AM, fungus wrote:
> On Tuesday, October 23, 2012 5:46:51 AM UTC+2, Ivan Vegvary wrote: >> >> Anyway, could some of you point me as to what flavor or version of >> Arduino to purchase. Also what tutorials (books) would you recommend. >> > > Short answer: Arduino Uno > > You only really need an Arduino Mega if you're going to write big programs. For everything else the Uno is better - more support, more shields, more code... > > The extra I/O pins on the Mega aren't as big an advantage as they might appear, it's trivial to add more I/O to an Uno via shift registers, etc. > > The mega is also very difficult to repair if you blow the chip by connecting up something you shouldn't. With an Uno it takes a few seconds to drop in a $3 replacement. > > The best place for Arduino info is the Arduino web site. >
One thing to remember is that Arduino gets harder to use the bigger the program is, because there's no in-circuit debugging: you have to use burn-and-crash. The library is a big win for small stuff, and for getting something sort-of working quickly. For anything complicated, though, it's less work overall to code in C and use Eclipse. If anybody has an Arduino-ish system with nice libraries and ICD, I'd be interested to know about it. Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net
On Tuesday, October 23, 2012 4:32:59 PM UTC+2, Phil Hobbs wrote:
> > > One thing to remember is that Arduino gets harder to use the bigger the > > program is, because there's no in-circuit debugging: you have to use > > burn-and-crash. >
Yes there is...all the recent Atmel chips have "debugWIRE" debugging https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DebugWIRE The Arduino IDE doesn't do it, but it's possible. Or just do what everybody else does and dump data to the PC via the serial port (or via Bluetooth, which is less intrusive) Add a small two-wire screen to it: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=arduino+oled+display Add a VGA monitor: http://excamera.com/sphinx/gameduino/ Or whatever... :-)
On 10/23/2012 02:35 PM, fungus wrote:
> On Tuesday, October 23, 2012 4:32:59 PM UTC+2, Phil Hobbs wrote: >> >> >> One thing to remember is that Arduino gets harder to use the bigger the >> >> program is, because there's no in-circuit debugging: you have to use >> >> burn-and-crash. >> > > Yes there is...all the recent Atmel chips have > "debugWIRE" debugging > > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DebugWIRE > > The Arduino IDE doesn't do it, but it's > possible.
That's the point I was making. The Arduino hardware doesn't do it either.
> > Or just do what everybody else does and > dump data to the PC via the serial port > (or via Bluetooth, which is less intrusive) > > Add a small two-wire screen to it: > > http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=arduino+oled+display > > Add a VGA monitor: > > http://excamera.com/sphinx/gameduino/ > > Or whatever... :-)
Sure, I've done some of that--my son was interning with me this summer, learning gizmo-building and firmware. Burn-and-crash plus printf to serial is nowhere near as fast or useful as JTAG (or even DebugWire) plus Eclipse. The library's nice, but it's not what you want for any serious sort of development. Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net
On Monday, October 22, 2012 8:46:51 PM UTC-7, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
> Want to buy an Arduino. Too many choices that I don't understand. Price=
s all seem to be nearly the same.
>=20 >=20 >=20 > Arduino will be used by a small group of high school students to build a =
"pick and place" robotics arm. School has a 3D printer and a laser cutter.= We also have lots of motors and servos from VEX robotics kits. We could = use the VEX controllers but I would like the students to learn an "open sou= rce" platform. Process will included sketching, designing parts using Auto= Cad Inventor, printing the base, arms, knuckles, motor supports, gears, et= c. with the 3D printers, winding a coil to create an electro-magnet as the = pick up. Goal will be to autonomously and with joy sticks pick and place s= mall metal discs.
>=20 >=20 >=20 > Anyway, could some of you point me as to what flavor or version of Arduin=
o to purchase. Also what tutorials (books) would you recommend.
>=20 >=20 >=20 > Thanks,=20 >=20 > Ivan Vegvary
Thanks everybody, will go with the UNO. Already ordered it. Great group!!= !!
On Tuesday, October 23, 2012 10:00:36 PM UTC+2, Phil Hobbs wrote:
> > > The Arduino IDE doesn't do it, but it's > > > possible. > > That's the point I was making. The Arduino hardware doesn't do it either. >
It's all done via the reset pin so it's difficult for any hardware to NOT support it...you'd have to snip the pin off the chip.
On 10/24/2012 08:22 AM, fungus wrote:
> On Tuesday, October 23, 2012 10:00:36 PM UTC+2, Phil Hobbs wrote: >> >>> The Arduino IDE doesn't do it, but it's >> >>> possible. >> >> That's the point I was making. The Arduino hardware doesn't do it either. >> > > It's all done via the reset pin so it's difficult > for any hardware to NOT support it...you'd have > to snip the pin off the chip.
I know how it's done--I've designed several ATmega gizmos in the last couple of years, one of which used a bidirectional level shifter on the reset pin. There's even an ISP header on the Arduino Uno board. Since the Arduino development system doesn't support ISP, though, you have to go through all the pain of porting the library over to an Eclipse project, and once you've done that, what's the point of the Arduino-specific stuff anyway? You might as well save the code space used by the bootloader. Having a standard interface pinout is nice and all, but the lack of source-level debugging really makes it more of a toy. Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net
On 10/23/12 1:00 PM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
> On 10/23/2012 02:35 PM, fungus wrote: >> On Tuesday, October 23, 2012 4:32:59 PM UTC+2, Phil Hobbs wrote: >>> >>> >>> One thing to remember is that Arduino gets harder to use the bigger the >>> >>> program is, because there's no in-circuit debugging: you have to use >>> >>> burn-and-crash. >>> >> >> Yes there is...all the recent Atmel chips have >> "debugWIRE" debugging >> >> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DebugWIRE >> >> The Arduino IDE doesn't do it, but it's >> possible. > > That's the point I was making. The Arduino hardware doesn't do it either.
Yes it does. Arduino at its core is an ATMega328. Anything that chip supports, you can make Arduino do.