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Cannot remove caps from motherboard

Started by Anonymous September 23, 2012
I'm trying to repair my MSI motherboard by replacing the caps near the 
regulators since they are bulging and are most likely defective. 
However, even at the highest setting of my soldering iron (480 degrees 
Celcius) I'm unable to liquify the solder. I don't know what kind of 
solder they're using for motherboards but it's obviously not the kind 
you can easily manipulate with common DIY tools.

Anyone have a trick for solving this problem?

Anonymous wrote:
> > I'm trying to repair my MSI motherboard by replacing the caps near the > regulators since they are bulging and are most likely defective. > However, even at the highest setting of my soldering iron (480 degrees > Celcius) I'm unable to liquify the solder. I don't know what kind of > solder they're using for motherboards but it's obviously not the kind > you can easily manipulate with common DIY tools. > > Anyone have a trick for solving this problem?
What tools are you using? A vacuum desoldering iron is the proper tools. Solder wick is a poor second choice. Remove what you can, then refill the hole with 63/37 solder which has a lower melting point. The ROHS crap solder takes a lot more heat to melt. Clean off the excess flux, then use the vacuum tool again. The flux will destroy the hollow tip in a hurry.
Anonymous wrote:

> I'm trying to repair my MSI motherboard by replacing the caps near the > regulators since they are bulging and are most likely defective. > However, even at the highest setting of my soldering iron (480 degrees > Celcius) I'm unable to liquify the solder. I don't know what kind of > solder they're using for motherboards but it's obviously not the kind > you can easily manipulate with common DIY tools. > > Anyone have a trick for solving this problem? >
feed low temp solder into the junction, it'll soften and mix with it. or, could it be possible your iron is not properly functioning? also, by using a blunt tip like a spade tip, it makes the job easier to heat the area. With small tips you don't have a lot of heat retention. Jamie
On 9/23/2012 3:37 PM, Anonymous wrote:
> I'm trying to repair my MSI motherboard by replacing the caps near the > regulators since they are bulging and are most likely defective. > However, even at the highest setting of my soldering iron (480 degrees > Celcius) I'm unable to liquify the solder. I don't know what kind of > solder they're using for motherboards but it's obviously not the kind > you can easily manipulate with common DIY tools. > > Anyone have a trick for solving this problem? >
Keep in mind they are multilayer boards. Removing parts can be tricky or even damage the intermediate layers. Dell had a problem with caps a few years back and replacement turned out to be not nice. Tom
On Sun, 23 Sep 2012 19:37:35 +0000 (UTC), Anonymous
<nobody@remailer.paranoici.org> wrote:

>I'm trying to repair my MSI motherboard by replacing the caps near the >regulators since they are bulging and are most likely defective. >However, even at the highest setting of my soldering iron (480 degrees >Celcius) I'm unable to liquify the solder. I don't know what kind of >solder they're using for motherboards but it's obviously not the kind >you can easily manipulate with common DIY tools.
If it were really 480C, you'd have destroyed the board. Even RoHS solder melts before 350C. Your iron probably doesn't put out enough heat (wattage too low) or is defective. These caps are tied directly to internal planes so it can take a *lot* of heat.
>Anyone have a trick for solving this problem?
As Jamie suggested, you can try melting in some 63/37 solder to lower the melting point of the solder that's already there. You gotta get the solder melted before any other techniques will help, though.
"Anonymous"

> I'm trying to repair my MSI motherboard by replacing the caps near the > regulators since they are bulging and are most likely defective. > However, even at the highest setting of my soldering iron (480 degrees > Celcius) I'm unable to liquify the solder. I don't know what kind of > solder they're using for motherboards but it's obviously not the kind > you can easily manipulate with common DIY tools. > > Anyone have a trick for solving this problem? >
** Wiggle the caps until they break away from the PCB leaving only the stubs of the leads in the PCB. Then you can heat the stubs directly and remove them. OR, just solder the new caps to them, keeping the leads short. .... Phil
On Sun, 23 Sep 2012 19:37:35 +0000 (UTC), Anonymous
<nobody@remailer.paranoici.org> wrote:

>I'm trying to repair my MSI motherboard by replacing the caps near the >regulators since they are bulging and are most likely defective. >However, even at the highest setting of my soldering iron (480 degrees >Celcius) I'm unable to liquify the solder. I don't know what kind of >solder they're using for motherboards but it's obviously not the kind >you can easily manipulate with common DIY tools. > >Anyone have a trick for solving this problem?
Might try lowering the melting point with some of ChipQuik. It is marketed as an aid for surface-mount removal but I'd guess that the lower melting point might be helpful here as well. Fairly inexpensive, so it's a handy tool in your kit, regardless. http://www.chipquik.com/ Note: yes, it's kind of a hokey website but the stuff really does work. -- Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
On Sunday, September 23, 2012 9:38:23 PM UTC+2, Anonymous wrote:
> > Anyone have a trick for solving this problem?
Get a big pair of pliers and pull very hard! With a bit of luck you'll leave the legs behind and you can solder the new cap onto them. Failing that, add some more solder. This gives a better thermal contact with the soldering iron.
fungus wrote:
> > On Sunday, September 23, 2012 9:38:23 PM UTC+2, Anonymous wrote: > > > > Anyone have a trick for solving this problem? > > Get a big pair of pliers and pull very hard! > > With a bit of luck you'll leave the legs behind > and you can solder the new cap onto them.
Or you'll damage the PTH and destroy the board.
> Failing that, add some more solder. This gives > a better thermal contact with the soldering iron.
Big deal. You need to lower the melting point by using a solder with a higher lead content.
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