Forums

Replacement wall-wart help needed

Started by Unknown August 19, 2012
This is a total "noob" question and I have done some searches but want to b=
e sure before I go and purchase a replacement.

I own something called a Bitscope which I use for tinkering with electronic=
s.  It an older one and I'm pretty sure the wall-wart power supply is dead.=
  The creator of the Bitscope isn't responding to my emails so I'm sorta st=
uck trying to find a replacement one and so far no luck on an exact match.
If I'm reading the PS correctly it says that the output is:

10VAC
1A

My electronics knowledge is pretty basic, but am I right in that I could ch=
oose a supply that is rated higher in amperage but would need the exact vol=
tage specified?  I've looked on digikey and a few places and can't seem to =
find a supply that puts out 10VAC.

Any help/info would be greatly appreciated.

thanks,
~brian
On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 12:43:43 -0700 (PDT), telengard@gmail.com wrote:

>This is a total "noob" question and I have done some searches but want to be sure before I go and purchase a replacement. > >I own something called a Bitscope which I use for tinkering with electronics. It an older one and I'm pretty sure the wall-wart power supply is dead. The creator of the Bitscope isn't responding to my emails so I'm sorta stuck trying to find a replacement one and so far no luck on an exact match. >If I'm reading the PS correctly it says that the output is: > >10VAC >1A > >My electronics knowledge is pretty basic, but am I right in that I could choose a supply that is rated higher in amperage but would need the exact voltage specified? I've looked on digikey and a few places and can't seem to find a supply that puts out 10VAC. > >Any help/info would be greatly appreciated.
Since it's rated as AC then you know that there's a converter inside and so it should be fairly forgiving in terms of what you can feed it. Let's see now <clickety click> Yup, it's a linear: <http://www.bitscope.com/design/hardware/pdf/Bs11-2.PDF> A 12 VAC wart may be easier to find than a 10 and it'll work fine. -- Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
In article <e34985b6-de75-474c-9e4d-52d2b6e70af8@googlegroups.com>,
 telengard@gmail.com wrote:

> This is a total "noob" question and I have done some searches but want to be > sure before I go and purchase a replacement. > > I own something called a Bitscope which I use for tinkering with electronics. > It an older one and I'm pretty sure the wall-wart power supply is dead. The > creator of the Bitscope isn't responding to my emails so I'm sorta stuck > trying to find a replacement one and so far no luck on an exact match. > If I'm reading the PS correctly it says that the output is: > > 10VAC > 1A > > My electronics knowledge is pretty basic, but am I right in that I could > choose a supply that is rated higher in amperage but would need the exact > voltage specified? I've looked on digikey and a few places and can't seem to > find a supply that puts out 10VAC. > > Any help/info would be greatly appreciated. > > thanks, > ~brian
First off, check the power adapter with a voltmeter. If you don't have one, go buy at least a cheap one - less than $10 will get you some piece of chinese junk that will be handy for working on the car or anyplace else you wouldn't want to take a nice one lest you should drive over it, and see if the wall wart is, or is not, putting out 10VAC. There are only a few things that might kill a simple transformer wall-wart like this, so odds are good (barring you've already tested it and not mentioned that fact) that the more likely to die device is what it plugs into, rather than itself. Yes, you need 10 VAC and any amperage 1 or above will work (note that his may be written as 1000mA - just one amp in different notation, like 100 cents to a dollar.) Whether it would work on 9VAC or 12VAC is not something we can figure out - some things are quite picky about supply voltage, others not so much. Best to stick with what it used originally unless you hear otherwise from the unresponsive developer. ebay (also known as sleazebay, so caveat emptor to the max) is probably your best source for a 10VAC wall wart if it's actually dead. They are out there, especially in the used market, just not stunningly common these days. I think they were a common voltage for modem wall-warts at one point. -- Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.
On Sunday, August 19, 2012 9:43:43 PM UTC+2, (unknown) wrote:
> This is a total "noob" question and I have done some searches but want to=
be sure before I go and purchase a replacement.
>=20 >=20 >=20 > I own something called a Bitscope which I use for tinkering with electron=
ics. It an older one and I'm pretty sure the wall-wart power supply is dea= d. The creator of the Bitscope isn't responding to my emails so I'm sorta = stuck trying to find a replacement one and so far no luck on an exact match= .
>=20 > If I'm reading the PS correctly it says that the output is: >=20 > 10VAC >=20 > 1A >=20
According to the web site, that's correct, yes. http://www.bitscope.com/design/hardware/?p=3Dpower
>=20 >=20 > My electronics knowledge is pretty basic, but am I > right in that I could choose a supply that is rated > higher in amperage but would need the exact voltage > specified?
Yes.
> I've looked on digikey and a few places and can't > seem to find a supply that puts out 10VAC. >=20
I'm not sure you'll find a simple wall-wart that puts out AC. They're all DC. Have you measured the output of the power supply to make sure that's the problem? If there's no output can you open it up and look if there's a fuse inside?
In article 
<MyNameForward-4738AC.16155119082012@news.eternal-september.org>,
 Ecnerwal <MyNameForward@ReplaceWithMyVices.Com.invalid> wrote:
> Whether it would work on 9VAC or 12VAC is not > something we can figure out
Rich Webb posted: <http://www.bitscope.com/design/hardware/pdf/Bs11-2.PDF> And I sit corrected. 10-12VAC right there on the drawing. -- Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.
On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 16:33:37 -0400, Ecnerwal
<MyNameForward@ReplaceWithMyVices.Com.invalid> wrote:

>In article ><MyNameForward-4738AC.16155119082012@news.eternal-september.org>, > Ecnerwal <MyNameForward@ReplaceWithMyVices.Com.invalid> wrote: >> Whether it would work on 9VAC or 12VAC is not >> something we can figure out > >Rich Webb posted: > ><http://www.bitscope.com/design/hardware/pdf/Bs11-2.PDF> > >And I sit corrected. 10-12VAC right there on the drawing.
Yes, the regulators will run a little hotter but (presumably) they've accounted for that in the design. OTOH, they used Comic Sans so who knows? ;-) -- Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
Rich Webb wrote:
 >...
 > <http://www.bitscope.com/design/hardware/pdf/Bs11-2.PDF>
...

Since the OP's question has been answered, he shouldn't mind if I divert 
this thread with a couple about the BitScope power supply.

1. What is the purpose of the choke on the Analogue Power common?

2. What is the purpose of diodes D12 & 13 on the Analogue Power inputs? 
  My guess would be to prevent the Digital Power section from drawing on 
the A-P caps C19 & 20.

3. Why is there separate (but equal) regulators for analog & digital?

Thanks,
Bob
fungus wrote on 20/08/2012 :
> On Sunday, August 19, 2012 9:43:43 PM UTC+2, (unknown) wrote: >> This is a total "noob" question and I have done some searches but want to be >> sure before I go and purchase a replacement. >> >> >> >> I own something called a Bitscope which I use for tinkering with >> electronics. It an older one and I'm pretty sure the wall-wart power supply >> is dead. The creator of the Bitscope isn't responding to my emails so I'm >> sorta stuck trying to find a replacement one and so far no luck on an exact >> match. >> >> If I'm reading the PS correctly it says that the output is: >> >> 10VAC >> >> 1A >> > > According to the web site, that's correct, yes. > > http://www.bitscope.com/design/hardware/?p=power > > >> >> >> My electronics knowledge is pretty basic, but am I >> right in that I could choose a supply that is rated >> higher in amperage but would need the exact voltage >> specified? > > Yes. > >> I've looked on digikey and a few places and can't >> seem to find a supply that puts out 10VAC. >> > > I'm not sure you'll find a simple wall-wart that > puts out AC. They're all DC.
Please do not make Categorical statements about which you know Nothing. Many Modems and some small audio mixers use 10 volts AC to get + and - supply rails. The first one I picked up in my obsolete stuff heap was 10 volts AC 1 Amp. And it is just a simple iron and copper wall-wart. :-?
> > Have you measured the output of the power supply > to make sure that's the problem? > > If there's no output can you open it up and look > if there's a fuse inside?
-- John G
On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 19:31:43 -0400, Bob Engelhardt
<bobengelhardt@comcast.net> wrote:

>Rich Webb wrote: > >... > > <http://www.bitscope.com/design/hardware/pdf/Bs11-2.PDF> >... > >Since the OP's question has been answered, he shouldn't mind if I divert >this thread with a couple about the BitScope power supply. > >1. What is the purpose of the choke on the Analogue Power common?
I'd guess HF noise suppression to the outside world.
>2. What is the purpose of diodes D12 & 13 on the Analogue Power inputs? > My guess would be to prevent the Digital Power section from drawing on >the A-P caps C19 & 20.
Sounds plausible.
>3. Why is there separate (but equal) regulators for analog & digital?
Presumably to help isolate digital noise (lots of switching and fast edges) from the analog section. -- Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
Wow, thanks for all of the excellent help (and info).  I didn't realize I c=
ould just check the power supply output.  For some reason I assumed it ther=
e would have to be a load attached.  It's very possible the unit itself has=
 gone belly up (it's almost 8 yrs old I believe).

Also good to know that a 12VAC one will work also.

You folks are thorough!

thanks,
~brian