Forums

Battery switch

Started by W. eWatson April 1, 2012
I bought a device that will allow me to undo a plastic knob and 
disconnect my battery. Should I put it on the ground or hot cable?  The 
only negative affect seems to be that I would need to reset the clock 
each time I reconnected the battery; otherwise, I would think that no 
harm would come to the electronics.

Recently, it's gotten bad enough that it drained my battery.

I'm doing this on a 1997 Plymouth van, since in the rainy season 
dampness appears to get into the door latching electronics. That causes 
random attempts to lock and unlock the doors. It seems that normally it 
locks the doors, but then can't open them. Of course, I use a key to 
open the doors when necessary. It's easy to hear the mechanism try to 
open or close the latches.

On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 12:46:24 -0700, W. eWatson wrote:

> I bought a device that will allow me to undo a plastic knob and > disconnect my battery. Should I put it on the ground or hot cable? The > only negative affect seems to be that I would need to reset the clock > each time I reconnected the battery; otherwise, I would think that no > harm would come to the electronics. > > Recently, it's gotten bad enough that it drained my battery. > > I'm doing this on a 1997 Plymouth van, since in the rainy season > dampness appears to get into the door latching electronics. That causes > random attempts to lock and unlock the doors. It seems that normally it > locks the doors, but then can't open them. Of course, I use a key to > open the doors when necessary. It's easy to hear the mechanism try to > open or close the latches.
It doesn't make a lot of difference which side of the battery you disconnect: an open switch is an open switch. When you're working on a car and need to disconnect a battery you want to do the side that's connected to the chassis first (which is negative on anything modern), but that's because you don't want your wrench to short from the + batter terminal to the frame, with your hand on part of the conductive path. If the door locks seem to be the only problem, and if they're on a separate circuit, you could just pull that fuse. Then you wouldn't have electric door locks, but you wouldn't have to pop the hood and turn the switch any time you wanted to go someplace, and your radio would remember all of its presets. -- Tim Wescott Control system and signal processing consulting www.wescottdesign.com
On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 16:12:30 -0500, Tim Wescott
<tim@seemywebsite.please> wrote:

>On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 12:46:24 -0700, W. eWatson wrote: > >> I bought a device that will allow me to undo a plastic knob and >> disconnect my battery. Should I put it on the ground or hot cable? The >> only negative affect seems to be that I would need to reset the clock >> each time I reconnected the battery; otherwise, I would think that no >> harm would come to the electronics. >> >> Recently, it's gotten bad enough that it drained my battery. >> >> I'm doing this on a 1997 Plymouth van, since in the rainy season >> dampness appears to get into the door latching electronics. That causes >> random attempts to lock and unlock the doors. It seems that normally it >> locks the doors, but then can't open them. Of course, I use a key to >> open the doors when necessary. It's easy to hear the mechanism try to >> open or close the latches. > >It doesn't make a lot of difference which side of the battery you >disconnect: an open switch is an open switch. > >When you're working on a car and need to disconnect a battery you want to >do the side that's connected to the chassis first (which is negative on >anything modern), but that's because you don't want your wrench to short >from the + batter terminal to the frame, with your hand on part of the >conductive path. > >If the door locks seem to be the only problem, and if they're on a >separate circuit, you could just pull that fuse. Then you wouldn't have >electric door locks, but you wouldn't have to pop the hood and turn the >switch any time you wanted to go someplace, and your radio would remember >all of its presets.
Or examine the harness from body to door, and unplug the culprit. ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson, CTO | mens | | Analog Innovations, Inc. | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | Phoenix, Arizona 85048 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 14:14:53 -0700, Jim Thompson wrote:

> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 16:12:30 -0500, Tim Wescott > <tim@seemywebsite.please> wrote: > >>On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 12:46:24 -0700, W. eWatson wrote: >> >>> I bought a device that will allow me to undo a plastic knob and >>> disconnect my battery. Should I put it on the ground or hot cable? >>> The only negative affect seems to be that I would need to reset the >>> clock each time I reconnected the battery; otherwise, I would think >>> that no harm would come to the electronics. >>> >>> Recently, it's gotten bad enough that it drained my battery. >>> >>> I'm doing this on a 1997 Plymouth van, since in the rainy season >>> dampness appears to get into the door latching electronics. That >>> causes random attempts to lock and unlock the doors. It seems that >>> normally it locks the doors, but then can't open them. Of course, I >>> use a key to open the doors when necessary. It's easy to hear the >>> mechanism try to open or close the latches. >> >>It doesn't make a lot of difference which side of the battery you >>disconnect: an open switch is an open switch. >> >>When you're working on a car and need to disconnect a battery you want >>to do the side that's connected to the chassis first (which is negative >>on anything modern), but that's because you don't want your wrench to >>short from the + batter terminal to the frame, with your hand on part of >>the conductive path. >> >>If the door locks seem to be the only problem, and if they're on a >>separate circuit, you could just pull that fuse. Then you wouldn't have >>electric door locks, but you wouldn't have to pop the hood and turn the >>switch any time you wanted to go someplace, and your radio would >>remember all of its presets. > > Or examine the harness from body to door, and unplug the culprit.
Yea, but I kinda figured that "chase down the real problem" was off the table. But -- it wouldn't hurt to try. -- My liberal friends think I'm a conservative kook. My conservative friends think I'm a liberal kook. Why am I not happy that they have found common ground? Tim Wescott, Communications, Control, Circuits & Software http://www.wescottdesign.com
On 4/1/2012 2:12 PM, Tim Wescott wrote:
> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 12:46:24 -0700, W. eWatson wrote: > >> I bought a device that will allow me to undo a plastic knob and >> disconnect my battery. Should I put it on the ground or hot cable? The >> only negative affect seems to be that I would need to reset the clock >> each time I reconnected the battery; otherwise, I would think that no >> harm would come to the electronics. >> >> Recently, it's gotten bad enough that it drained my battery. >> >> I'm doing this on a 1997 Plymouth van, since in the rainy season >> dampness appears to get into the door latching electronics. That causes >> random attempts to lock and unlock the doors. It seems that normally it >> locks the doors, but then can't open them. Of course, I use a key to >> open the doors when necessary. It's easy to hear the mechanism try to >> open or close the latches. > > It doesn't make a lot of difference which side of the battery you > disconnect: an open switch is an open switch. > > When you're working on a car and need to disconnect a battery you want to > do the side that's connected to the chassis first (which is negative on > anything modern), but that's because you don't want your wrench to short > from the + batter terminal to the frame, with your hand on part of the > conductive path. > > If the door locks seem to be the only problem, and if they're on a > separate circuit, you could just pull that fuse. Then you wouldn't have > electric door locks, but you wouldn't have to pop the hood and turn the > switch any time you wanted to go someplace, and your radio would remember > all of its presets. >
Ah, I forgot about the presets. I think my users manual has a description of the fuses. I have some small recollection of pulling out one of them for some other similar problem.
On 4/1/2012 2:14 PM, Jim Thompson wrote:
> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 16:12:30 -0500, Tim Wescott > <tim@seemywebsite.please> wrote: > >> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 12:46:24 -0700, W. eWatson wrote: >> >>> I bought a device that will allow me to undo a plastic knob and >>> disconnect my battery. Should I put it on the ground or hot cable? The >>> only negative affect seems to be that I would need to reset the clock >>> each time I reconnected the battery; otherwise, I would think that no >>> harm would come to the electronics. >>> >>> Recently, it's gotten bad enough that it drained my battery. >>> >>> I'm doing this on a 1997 Plymouth van, since in the rainy season >>> dampness appears to get into the door latching electronics. That causes >>> random attempts to lock and unlock the doors. It seems that normally it >>> locks the doors, but then can't open them. Of course, I use a key to >>> open the doors when necessary. It's easy to hear the mechanism try to >>> open or close the latches. >> >> It doesn't make a lot of difference which side of the battery you >> disconnect: an open switch is an open switch. >> >> When you're working on a car and need to disconnect a battery you want to >> do the side that's connected to the chassis first (which is negative on >> anything modern), but that's because you don't want your wrench to short >>from the + batter terminal to the frame, with your hand on part of the >> conductive path. >> >> If the door locks seem to be the only problem, and if they're on a >> separate circuit, you could just pull that fuse. Then you wouldn't have >> electric door locks, but you wouldn't have to pop the hood and turn the >> switch any time you wanted to go someplace, and your radio would remember >> all of its presets. > > Or examine the harness from body to door, and unplug the culprit. > > ...Jim Thompson
Well, maybe. There are two front doors, two side sliding doors, and a hatch. All seem to get going at some point.
On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 19:51:03 -0700, W. eWatson wrote:

> On 4/1/2012 2:14 PM, Jim Thompson wrote: >> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 16:12:30 -0500, Tim Wescott >> <tim@seemywebsite.please> wrote: >> >>> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 12:46:24 -0700, W. eWatson wrote: >>> >>>> I bought a device that will allow me to undo a plastic knob and >>>> disconnect my battery. Should I put it on the ground or hot cable? >>>> The only negative affect seems to be that I would need to reset the >>>> clock each time I reconnected the battery; otherwise, I would think >>>> that no harm would come to the electronics. >>>> >>>> Recently, it's gotten bad enough that it drained my battery. >>>> >>>> I'm doing this on a 1997 Plymouth van, since in the rainy season >>>> dampness appears to get into the door latching electronics. That >>>> causes random attempts to lock and unlock the doors. It seems that >>>> normally it locks the doors, but then can't open them. Of course, I >>>> use a key to open the doors when necessary. It's easy to hear the >>>> mechanism try to open or close the latches. >>> >>> It doesn't make a lot of difference which side of the battery you >>> disconnect: an open switch is an open switch. >>> >>> When you're working on a car and need to disconnect a battery you want >>> to do the side that's connected to the chassis first (which is >>> negative on anything modern), but that's because you don't want your >>> wrench to short >>>from the + batter terminal to the frame, with your hand on part of the >>> conductive path. >>> >>> If the door locks seem to be the only problem, and if they're on a >>> separate circuit, you could just pull that fuse. Then you wouldn't >>> have electric door locks, but you wouldn't have to pop the hood and >>> turn the switch any time you wanted to go someplace, and your radio >>> would remember all of its presets. >> >> Or examine the harness from body to door, and unplug the culprit. >> >> ...Jim Thompson > Well, maybe. There are two front doors, two side sliding doors, and a > hatch. All seem to get going at some point.
If it has a keyless entry system, I'd try disconnecting the receiver for the entry system, or (if there is one) whatever bit of power electronics is downstream from it that's pulling the solenoids or motors. Once you're at the point of driving many amps at 12V into a motor or solenoid it would take more than just moisture to set things off. Otherwise -- pull the fuse. -- My liberal friends think I'm a conservative kook. My conservative friends think I'm a liberal kook. Why am I not happy that they have found common ground? Tim Wescott, Communications, Control, Circuits & Software http://www.wescottdesign.com
On 2012-04-01, W. eWatson <wolftracks@invalid.com> wrote:
> I bought a device that will allow me to undo a plastic knob and > disconnect my battery. Should I put it on the ground or hot cable? The > only negative affect seems to be that I would need to reset the clock > each time I reconnected the battery; otherwise, I would think that no > harm would come to the electronics.
In the ground leg there's less uninslated live metal around.
> I'm doing this on a 1997 Plymouth van, since in the rainy season > dampness appears to get into the door latching electronics. That causes > random attempts to lock and unlock the doors. It seems that normally it > locks the doors, but then can't open them. Of course, I use a key to > open the doors when necessary. It's easy to hear the mechanism try to > open or close the latches.
I'd be removing the fuse for the locking. -- &#9858;&#9859; 100% natural --- Posted via news://freenews.netfront.net/ - Complaints to news@netfront.net ---
On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 12:46:24 -0700, "W. eWatson"
<wolftracks@invalid.com> wrote:

>I bought a device that will allow me to undo a plastic knob and >disconnect my battery. Should I put it on the ground or hot cable? The >only negative affect seems to be that I would need to reset the clock >each time I reconnected the battery; otherwise, I would think that no >harm would come to the electronics. > >Recently, it's gotten bad enough that it drained my battery. > >I'm doing this on a 1997 Plymouth van, since in the rainy season >dampness appears to get into the door latching electronics. That causes >random attempts to lock and unlock the doors. It seems that normally it >locks the doors, but then can't open them. Of course, I use a key to >open the doors when necessary. It's easy to hear the mechanism try to >open or close the latches.
You may also want to check the ECM, it can cause all sorts of strange behavior.