Forums

Projector

Started by BeeJ January 27, 2012
OT ?  But you tech guys probably have some good suggestions.
I don't need some biased sales person telling me anything.

I want to set up a projector to view Blu-Ray DVDs.
Room is of sufficient size.

So I need one that:
   Very Bright
   High Resolution
   Very Reliable
   Costs less than $5K

Other considertions?

Is there one per above that is LED or laser driven rather than lamp.

Will get a proper screen:  suggestions there too please.

Are there links to pertinent recent reviews.


On Friday, January 27, 2012 6:44:53 PM UTC-7, BeeJ wrote:
> OT ? But you tech guys probably have some good suggestions. > I don't need some biased sales person telling me anything. >=20 > I want to set up a projector to view Blu-Ray DVDs. > Room is of sufficient size. >=20 > So I need one that: > Very Bright
The "brightness" figure for a projector is given in lumens, but that's a me= asure of the light energy leaving the lens; it's one factor in determining the pe= rceived brightness of the image, the others being the screen size, the scre= en "gain," and the ambient light level in the viewing room. Without knowing= those, the only advice someone could give you would be to get the projecto= r with the biggest output spec in lumens that you could afford, but there's= a significant chance that you'd wind up buying excessive brightness at the= expense of other features.
> High Resolution
Not much choice here, really. You're going to want 1920 x 1080 pixels, and= that's pretty much all you'd find anyway. Lower resolution projectors won= 't do Blu-ray discs justice, at least not on a larger screen.
> Very Reliable > Costs less than $5K >=20 > Other considertions?
Absolutely. First - how far will the projector be located from the screen?= You need to make sure the optics of the projector (the projection lens sy= stem) are capable of producing the desired image size at that distance. Al= so, unless the projector can be mounted such that it is facing the screen "= squarely" (i.e., a line from the projector lens to the screen is perpendicu= lar to both), you will wind up with a distorted image (look up "keystone di= stortion" for an example). Some projectors can correct for this, if such c= orrection is needed. You should also look into the basic imaging technology used by the projecto= r. Lots of projectors today use Texas Instrument's "Digital Light Processi= ng" (DLP) technology, in which the image is formed on a chip carrying liter= ally a couple of million tiny little square mirrors. But this technology do= esn't inherently provide a color image, so to get full color images you eit= her need to show the red, green, and blue images on a single chip in rapid = succession (called "field-sequential color") or use three of these imaging = chips, one for each color. The three-chip types are obviously going to be = more expensive, but provide the best image and avoid a problem that's inher= ent in the single-chip designs known as "color breakup" or the "rainbow eff= ect." Some people are very sensitive to this effect, in which you will per= ceive colored fringes around moving objects within the image, or if you mov= e your head rapidly such that the image moves across your field of vision. = If you're not overly sensitive to the problem (I'm not, personally), singl= e-chip projectors will be fine choices; if you are, you may need to look fo= r a three-chip design or use some other imaging technology. LCDs are the o= ther major imaging device common found in consumer projection. They typica= lly don't provide the high contrast of the DLP imagers, and have an overall= different "look" to the image. Shop and compare.) Finally, you'll need to consider other features that may be of concern to y= ou. Top of that list is likely what inputs you need: HDMI is the de-facto = standard digital interface for HDTV today, but you may also need the projec= tor to be able to handle the older analog TV connections standards (composi= te or component video, typically using "RCA" jacks, or "S-Video" which is t= ypically on a DIN connector) or to accept video from personal computers (wh= ich may provide HDMI, but which might also use VGA, DVI, or DisplayPort out= puts; of those, only DVI is directly compatible with HDMI). Bob M.
>=20 > Is there one per above that is LED or laser driven rather than lamp. >=20 > Will get a proper screen: suggestions there too please. >=20 > Are there links to pertinent recent reviews.
Bob Myers pretended :
> On Friday, January 27, 2012 6:44:53 PM UTC-7, BeeJ wrote: >> OT ? But you tech guys probably have some good suggestions. >> I don't need some biased sales person telling me anything. >> >> I want to set up a projector to view Blu-Ray DVDs. >> Room is of sufficient size. >> >> So I need one that: >> Very Bright > > The "brightness" figure for a projector is given in lumens, but that's a > measure of the light energy leaving the lens; it's one factor in determining > the perceived brightness of the image, the others being the screen size, the > screen "gain," and the ambient light level in the viewing room. Without > knowing those, the only advice someone could give you would be to get the > projector with the biggest output spec in lumens that you could afford, but > there's a significant chance that you'd wind up buying excessive brightness > at the expense of other features. > >> High Resolution > > Not much choice here, really. You're going to want 1920 x 1080 pixels, and > that's pretty much all you'd find anyway. Lower resolution projectors won't > do Blu-ray discs justice, at least not on a larger screen. > >> Very Reliable >> Costs less than $5K >> >> Other considertions? > > Absolutely. First - how far will the projector be located from the screen? > You need to make sure the optics of the projector (the projection lens > system) are capable of producing the desired image size at that distance. > Also, unless the projector can be mounted such that it is facing the screen > "squarely" (i.e., a line from the projector lens to the screen is > perpendicular to both), you will wind up with a distorted image (look up > "keystone distortion" for an example). Some projectors can correct for this, > if such correction is needed. > > You should also look into the basic imaging technology used by the projector. > Lots of projectors today use Texas Instrument's "Digital Light Processing" > (DLP) technology, in which the image is formed on a chip carrying literally a > couple of million tiny little square mirrors. But this technology doesn't > inherently provide a color image, so to get full color images you either need > to show the red, green, and blue images on a single chip in rapid succession > (called "field-sequential color") or use three of these imaging chips, one > for each color. The three-chip types are obviously going to be more > expensive, but provide the best image and avoid a problem that's inherent in > the single-chip designs known as "color breakup" or the "rainbow effect." > Some people are very sensitive to this effect, in which you will perceive > colored fringes around moving objects within the image, or if you move your > head rapidly such that the image moves across your field of vision. If > you're not overly sensitive to the problem (I'm not, personally), single-chip > projectors will be fine choices; if you are, you may need to look for a > three-chip design or use some other imaging technology. LCDs are the other > major imaging device common found in consumer projection. They typically > don't provide the high contrast of the DLP imagers, and have an overall > different "look" to the image. Shop and compare.) > > Finally, you'll need to consider other features that may be of concern to > you. Top of that list is likely what inputs you need: HDMI is the de-facto > standard digital interface for HDTV today, but you may also need the > projector to be able to handle the older analog TV connections standards > (composite or component video, typically using "RCA" jacks, or "S-Video" > which is typically on a DIN connector) or to accept video from personal > computers (which may provide HDMI, but which might also use VGA, DVI, or > DisplayPort outputs; of those, only DVI is directly compatible with HDMI). > > Bob M. >> >> Is there one per above that is LED or laser driven rather than lamp. >> >> Will get a proper screen: suggestions there too please. >> >> Are there links to pertinent recent reviews.
Thanks for all of that. The one missing piece in my limited knowledge bank was the one vs three chip DLP. So that is where I will begin my search. Anyone suggest brands or models? A place for me to start informed looking! Thanks
"BeeJ" <nospam@spamnot.com> wrote in message 
news:jg2ajl$l5b$1@speranza.aioe.org...
> Bob Myers pretended : >> On Friday, January 27, 2012 6:44:53 PM UTC-7, BeeJ wrote: >>> OT ? But you tech guys probably have some good suggestions. >>> I don't need some biased sales person telling me anything. >>> >>> I want to set up a projector to view Blu-Ray DVDs. >>> Room is of sufficient size. >>> >>> So I need one that: >>> Very Bright >> >> The "brightness" figure for a projector is given in lumens, but that's a >> measure of the light energy leaving the lens; it's one factor in >> determining the perceived brightness of the image, the others being the >> screen size, the screen "gain," and the ambient light level in the >> viewing room. Without knowing those, the only advice someone could give >> you would be to get the projector with the biggest output spec in lumens >> that you could afford, but there's a significant chance that you'd wind >> up buying excessive brightness at the expense of other features. >> >>> High Resolution >> >> Not much choice here, really. You're going to want 1920 x 1080 pixels, >> and that's pretty much all you'd find anyway. Lower resolution >> projectors won't do Blu-ray discs justice, at least not on a larger >> screen. >> >>> Very Reliable >>> Costs less than $5K >>> >>> Other considertions? >> >> Absolutely. First - how far will the projector be located from the >> screen? You need to make sure the optics of the projector (the >> projection lens system) are capable of producing the desired image size >> at that distance. Also, unless the projector can be mounted such that it >> is facing the screen "squarely" (i.e., a line from the projector lens to >> the screen is perpendicular to both), you will wind up with a distorted >> image (look up "keystone distortion" for an example). Some projectors >> can correct for this, if such correction is needed. >> >> You should also look into the basic imaging technology used by the >> projector. Lots of projectors today use Texas Instrument's "Digital Light >> Processing" (DLP) technology, in which the image is formed on a chip >> carrying literally a couple of million tiny little square mirrors. But >> this technology doesn't inherently provide a color image, so to get full >> color images you either need to show the red, green, and blue images on a >> single chip in rapid succession (called "field-sequential color") or use >> three of these imaging chips, one for each color. The three-chip types >> are obviously going to be more expensive, but provide the best image and >> avoid a problem that's inherent in the single-chip designs known as >> "color breakup" or the "rainbow effect." Some people are very sensitive >> to this effect, in which you will perceive colored fringes around moving >> objects within the image, or if you move your head rapidly such that the >> image moves across your field of vision. If you're not overly sensitive >> to the problem (I'm not, personally), single-chip projectors will be fine >> choices; if you are, you may need to look for a three-chip design or use >> some other imaging technology. LCDs are the other major imaging device >> common found in consumer projection. They typically don't provide the >> high contrast of the DLP imagers, and have an overall different "look" to >> the image. Shop and compare.) >> >> Finally, you'll need to consider other features that may be of concern to >> you. Top of that list is likely what inputs you need: HDMI is the >> de-facto standard digital interface for HDTV today, but you may also need >> the projector to be able to handle the older analog TV connections >> standards (composite or component video, typically using "RCA" jacks, or >> "S-Video" which is typically on a DIN connector) or to accept video from >> personal computers (which may provide HDMI, but which might also use VGA, >> DVI, or DisplayPort outputs; of those, only DVI is directly compatible >> with HDMI). >> >> Bob M. >>> >>> Is there one per above that is LED or laser driven rather than lamp. >>> >>> Will get a proper screen: suggestions there too please. >>> >>> Are there links to pertinent recent reviews. > > Thanks for all of that. > The one missing piece in my limited knowledge bank was the one vs three > chip DLP. So that is where I will begin my search. > > Anyone suggest brands or models? A place for me to start informed > looking! > > Thanks >
The link below is to a well respected audio/video forum. http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=9/