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orcad

Started by Michael Robinson January 24, 2012
I am new to PSpice and OrCAD.  I have a school project that requires making 
a circuit board.  I don't need to simulate it.  I'm looking for the fastest 
approach to getting the PCB made, and that's all.  My school has Orcad, so 
that's what I'm using.
I opened up OrCad Capture.  I have a choice to open a new "design" or a new 
"project."  Click on File/New Design and it opens up a schematic.  Click on 
File/New Project and see the choices Analog or Mixed A/D, PC Board Wizard, 
Programmable Logic Wizard, and Schematic.  It says the PC Board Wizard is 
"the quickest way to get started designing a system-level schematic design." 
Ok.  Now I have to choose the libraries to include.  (My project will have 
several IC's:  National LM27313 voltage booster, Allegro ACS715 hall effect 
current sensor, a 555 and a couple of three-terminal shunt voltage 
references.  All surface mount.  Also about 30 or so passives.)  Will going 
this way get me to my goal of copper-on-the-board quicker than I would if I 
started with the "design" option, and what should I know about the 
libraries?


"Michael Robinson" <kellrobinson@yahoo.com.no_spam> schreef in bericht 
news:4f1f0773$0$20075$882e7ee2@usenet-news.net...
>I am new to PSpice and OrCAD. I have a school project that requires making >a circuit board. I don't need to simulate it. I'm looking for the fastest >approach to getting the PCB made, and that's all. My school has Orcad, so >that's what I'm using. > I opened up OrCad Capture. I have a choice to open a new "design" or a > new "project." Click on File/New Design and it opens up a schematic. > Click on File/New Project and see the choices Analog or Mixed A/D, PC > Board Wizard, Programmable Logic Wizard, and Schematic. It says the PC > Board Wizard is "the quickest way to get started designing a system-level > schematic design." Ok. Now I have to choose the libraries to include. > (My project will have several IC's: National LM27313 voltage booster, > Allegro ACS715 hall effect current sensor, a 555 and a couple of > three-terminal shunt voltage references. All surface mount. Also about > 30 or so passives.) Will going this way get me to my goal of > copper-on-the-board quicker than I would if I started with the "design" > option, and what should I know about the libraries? > >
Designing a PCB wihout a schematic is the fastest way to a succesfull disaster. As you have schematic capture available, use it. From a schematic to a board is fully supported so you will not find big problems (I suppose). You will need the libraries that contain the details of the components used. So for the schematic the schematic symbol will do but as you have to make a PCB you will need the details (outlines, footprints) of the packages of the actual components. petrus bitbyter