Forums

Tide table audiograph

Started by Stumpy January 7, 2012
I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime to go 
poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength would 
make some very boring music.  If you sped up the frequency from days to kHz 
and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual sound 
waves you would hear something.  Probably a very regular tone that varied 
more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the signal 
to make it more interesting.

Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table data and 
then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio?  I know this is a 
ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing.

http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html

http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-wavelength.htm 


On 2012-01-07, Stumpy <perilmung@spamnet.corn> wrote:
> I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime to go > poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength would > make some very boring music. If you sped up the frequency from days to kHz > and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual sound > waves you would hear something. Probably a very regular tone that varied > more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the signal > to make it more interesting. > > Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table data and > then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio? I know this is a > ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing.
> http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html
The graphs are jpegs, the tables too. and the tables don't have evenly spaced samples. It's probably easier to find the generating function and use octave or matlab or a spreadsheet or something like that to convert that to samples that can be converted to wav. At ~1Khz 2012's data is going to get you <<1s of tone. -- &#9858;&#9859; 100% natural --- Posted via news://freenews.netfront.net/ - Complaints to news@netfront.net ---
"Jasen Betts" <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in message 
news:jea6c4$4sl$1@reversiblemaps.ath.cx...
> On 2012-01-07, Stumpy <perilmung@spamnet.corn> wrote: >> I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime to >> go >> poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength would >> make some very boring music. If you sped up the frequency from days to >> kHz >> and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual >> sound >> waves you would hear something. Probably a very regular tone that varied >> more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the >> signal >> to make it more interesting. >> >> Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table data >> and >> then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio? I know this is a >> ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing. > >> http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html > > The graphs are jpegs, the tables too. and the tables don't have evenly > spaced samples. > > It's probably easier to find the generating function and use octave or > matlab or a spreadsheet or something like that to convert that to > samples that can be converted to wav. > > At ~1Khz 2012's data is going to get you <<1s of tone. > >
I know the data has to come from elsewhere. 2 tides a day for 365 days would make a very short MP3 at 1kHz. It would take almost 7 years data to make a 5 minute "song". I bet NOAA has data from back quite a few years.
On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 12:42:01 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn>
wrote:

> >"Jasen Betts" <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in message >news:jea6c4$4sl$1@reversiblemaps.ath.cx... >> On 2012-01-07, Stumpy <perilmung@spamnet.corn> wrote: >>> I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime to >>> go >>> poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength would >>> make some very boring music. If you sped up the frequency from days to >>> kHz >>> and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual >>> sound >>> waves you would hear something. Probably a very regular tone that varied >>> more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the >>> signal >>> to make it more interesting. >>> >>> Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table data >>> and >>> then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio? I know this is a >>> ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing. >> >>> http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html >> >> The graphs are jpegs, the tables too. and the tables don't have evenly >> spaced samples. >> >> It's probably easier to find the generating function and use octave or >> matlab or a spreadsheet or something like that to convert that to >> samples that can be converted to wav. >> >> At ~1Khz 2012's data is going to get you <<1s of tone. >> >> > >I know the data has to come from elsewhere. 2 tides a day for 365 days >would make a very short MP3 at 1kHz. It would take almost 7 years data to >make a 5 minute "song". I bet NOAA has data from back quite a few years.
Maybe Mr. Google can help? <clickety click> Yes! <http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/ocng_textbook/chapter17/chapter17_04.htm> -- Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
"Rich Webb" <bbew.ar@mapson.nozirev.ten> wrote in message 
news:pfhhg7pqtlnrgeikchvl3ev4stqr5sktg8@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 12:42:01 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn> > wrote: > >> >>"Jasen Betts" <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in message >>news:jea6c4$4sl$1@reversiblemaps.ath.cx... >>> On 2012-01-07, Stumpy <perilmung@spamnet.corn> wrote: >>>> I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime to >>>> go >>>> poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength >>>> would >>>> make some very boring music. If you sped up the frequency from days to >>>> kHz >>>> and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual >>>> sound >>>> waves you would hear something. Probably a very regular tone that >>>> varied >>>> more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the >>>> signal >>>> to make it more interesting. >>>> >>>> Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table data >>>> and >>>> then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio? I know this is a >>>> ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing. >>> >>>> http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html >>> >>> The graphs are jpegs, the tables too. and the tables don't have evenly >>> spaced samples. >>> >>> It's probably easier to find the generating function and use octave or >>> matlab or a spreadsheet or something like that to convert that to >>> samples that can be converted to wav. >>> >>> At ~1Khz 2012's data is going to get you <<1s of tone. >>> >>> >> >>I know the data has to come from elsewhere. 2 tides a day for 365 days >>would make a very short MP3 at 1kHz. It would take almost 7 years data to >>make a 5 minute "song". I bet NOAA has data from back quite a few years. > > Maybe Mr. Google can help? <clickety click> Yes! > <http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/ocng_textbook/chapter17/chapter17_04.htm> > > -- > Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
Ha! If I could do math those formulas could feed an amp directly. I wonder if Octave or Matlab mentioned above can input formula 17.16?
On 1/7/2012 7:10 PM, Stumpy wrote:
> "Rich Webb"<bbew.ar@mapson.nozirev.ten> wrote in message > news:pfhhg7pqtlnrgeikchvl3ev4stqr5sktg8@4ax.com... >> On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 12:42:01 -0800, "Stumpy"<perilmung@spamnet.corn> >> wrote: >> >>> >>> "Jasen Betts"<jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in message >>> news:jea6c4$4sl$1@reversiblemaps.ath.cx... >>>> On 2012-01-07, Stumpy<perilmung@spamnet.corn> wrote: >>>>> I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime to >>>>> go >>>>> poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength >>>>> would >>>>> make some very boring music. If you sped up the frequency from days to >>>>> kHz >>>>> and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual >>>>> sound >>>>> waves you would hear something. Probably a very regular tone that >>>>> varied >>>>> more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the >>>>> signal >>>>> to make it more interesting. >>>>> >>>>> Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table data >>>>> and >>>>> then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio? I know this is a >>>>> ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing. >>>> >>>>> http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html >>>> >>>> The graphs are jpegs, the tables too. and the tables don't have evenly >>>> spaced samples. >>>> >>>> It's probably easier to find the generating function and use octave or >>>> matlab or a spreadsheet or something like that to convert that to >>>> samples that can be converted to wav. >>>> >>>> At ~1Khz 2012's data is going to get you<<1s of tone. >>>> >>>> >>> >>> I know the data has to come from elsewhere. 2 tides a day for 365 days >>> would make a very short MP3 at 1kHz. It would take almost 7 years data to >>> make a 5 minute "song". I bet NOAA has data from back quite a few years. >> >> Maybe Mr. Google can help?<clickety click> Yes! >> <http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/ocng_textbook/chapter17/chapter17_04.htm> >> >> -- >> Rich Webb Norfolk, VA > > Ha! If I could do math those formulas could feed an amp directly. I > wonder if Octave or Matlab mentioned above can input formula 17.16? > >
I'm not real knowledgeable about tides, but in our local bay the dc component changes with season and the amplitude is modulated by prevailing winds and I assume barometric pressure. Then you can throw in the wake of small fishing boats, large container ships and a few Navy vessels, including hovercraft. Hey, I have a very musical area! It seems without these other effects the tune would get repetitive. Mikek
On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 17:10:57 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn>
wrote:

> >"Rich Webb" <bbew.ar@mapson.nozirev.ten> wrote in message >news:pfhhg7pqtlnrgeikchvl3ev4stqr5sktg8@4ax.com... >> On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 12:42:01 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn> >> wrote: >> >>> >>>"Jasen Betts" <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in message >>>news:jea6c4$4sl$1@reversiblemaps.ath.cx... >>>> On 2012-01-07, Stumpy <perilmung@spamnet.corn> wrote: >>>>> I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime to >>>>> go >>>>> poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength >>>>> would >>>>> make some very boring music. If you sped up the frequency from days to >>>>> kHz >>>>> and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual >>>>> sound >>>>> waves you would hear something. Probably a very regular tone that >>>>> varied >>>>> more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the >>>>> signal >>>>> to make it more interesting. >>>>> >>>>> Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table data >>>>> and >>>>> then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio? I know this is a >>>>> ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing. >>>> >>>>> http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html >>>> >>>> The graphs are jpegs, the tables too. and the tables don't have evenly >>>> spaced samples. >>>> >>>> It's probably easier to find the generating function and use octave or >>>> matlab or a spreadsheet or something like that to convert that to >>>> samples that can be converted to wav. >>>> >>>> At ~1Khz 2012's data is going to get you <<1s of tone. >>>> >>>> >>> >>>I know the data has to come from elsewhere. 2 tides a day for 365 days >>>would make a very short MP3 at 1kHz. It would take almost 7 years data to >>>make a 5 minute "song". I bet NOAA has data from back quite a few years. >> >> Maybe Mr. Google can help? <clickety click> Yes! >> <http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/ocng_textbook/chapter17/chapter17_04.htm> >> >> -- >> Rich Webb Norfolk, VA > >Ha! If I could do math those formulas could feed an amp directly. I >wonder if Octave or Matlab mentioned above can input formula 17.16?
Certainly. However, Table 17.2 has the period and amplitude of the constituents already worked out, so it's really just a matter of summing each over time. If you want the actual tidal predictions for a non-ideal Earth and at a particular real tidal station, it gets a little trickier. -- Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 17:10:57 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn>
wrote:

> >"Rich Webb" <bbew.ar@mapson.nozirev.ten> wrote in message >news:pfhhg7pqtlnrgeikchvl3ev4stqr5sktg8@4ax.com... >> On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 12:42:01 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn> >> wrote: >> >>> >>>"Jasen Betts" <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in message >>>news:jea6c4$4sl$1@reversiblemaps.ath.cx... >>>> On 2012-01-07, Stumpy <perilmung@spamnet.corn> wrote: >>>>> I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime to >>>>> go >>>>> poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength >>>>> would >>>>> make some very boring music. If you sped up the frequency from days to >>>>> kHz >>>>> and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual >>>>> sound >>>>> waves you would hear something. Probably a very regular tone that >>>>> varied >>>>> more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the >>>>> signal >>>>> to make it more interesting. >>>>> >>>>> Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table data >>>>> and >>>>> then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio? I know this is a >>>>> ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing. >>>> >>>>> http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html >>>> >>>> The graphs are jpegs, the tables too. and the tables don't have evenly >>>> spaced samples. >>>> >>>> It's probably easier to find the generating function and use octave or >>>> matlab or a spreadsheet or something like that to convert that to >>>> samples that can be converted to wav. >>>> >>>> At ~1Khz 2012's data is going to get you <<1s of tone. >>>> >>>> >>> >>>I know the data has to come from elsewhere. 2 tides a day for 365 days >>>would make a very short MP3 at 1kHz. It would take almost 7 years data to >>>make a 5 minute "song". I bet NOAA has data from back quite a few years. >> >> Maybe Mr. Google can help? <clickety click> Yes! >> <http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/ocng_textbook/chapter17/chapter17_04.htm> >> >> -- >> Rich Webb Norfolk, VA > >Ha! If I could do math those formulas could feed an amp directly. I >wonder if Octave or Matlab mentioned above can input formula 17.16? >
Aha! Take a look at <http://www.math.sunysb.edu/~tony/tides/tidesounds.html> -- Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
"Rich Webb" <bbew.ar@mapson.nozirev.ten> wrote in message 
news:etuhg7d2co9rkv49l5t7m7mv1lonmkcem4@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 17:10:57 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn> > wrote: > >> >>"Rich Webb" <bbew.ar@mapson.nozirev.ten> wrote in message >>news:pfhhg7pqtlnrgeikchvl3ev4stqr5sktg8@4ax.com... >>> On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 12:42:01 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn> >>> wrote: >>> >>>> >>>>"Jasen Betts" <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in message >>>>news:jea6c4$4sl$1@reversiblemaps.ath.cx... >>>>> On 2012-01-07, Stumpy <perilmung@spamnet.corn> wrote: >>>>>> I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime >>>>>> to >>>>>> go >>>>>> poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength >>>>>> would >>>>>> make some very boring music. If you sped up the frequency from days >>>>>> to >>>>>> kHz >>>>>> and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual >>>>>> sound >>>>>> waves you would hear something. Probably a very regular tone that >>>>>> varied >>>>>> more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the >>>>>> signal >>>>>> to make it more interesting. >>>>>> >>>>>> Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table >>>>>> data >>>>>> and >>>>>> then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio? I know this is a >>>>>> ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing. >>>>> >>>>>> http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html >>>>> >>>>> The graphs are jpegs, the tables too. and the tables don't have evenly >>>>> spaced samples. >>>>> >>>>> It's probably easier to find the generating function and use octave or >>>>> matlab or a spreadsheet or something like that to convert that to >>>>> samples that can be converted to wav. >>>>> >>>>> At ~1Khz 2012's data is going to get you <<1s of tone. >>>>> >>>>> >>>> >>>>I know the data has to come from elsewhere. 2 tides a day for 365 days >>>>would make a very short MP3 at 1kHz. It would take almost 7 years data >>>>to >>>>make a 5 minute "song". I bet NOAA has data from back quite a few >>>>years. >>> >>> Maybe Mr. Google can help? <clickety click> Yes! >>> <http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/ocng_textbook/chapter17/chapter17_04.htm> >>> >>> -- >>> Rich Webb Norfolk, VA >> >>Ha! If I could do math those formulas could feed an amp directly. I >>wonder if Octave or Matlab mentioned above can input formula 17.16? > > Certainly. However, Table 17.2 has the period and amplitude of the > constituents already worked out, so it's really just a matter of summing > each over time. > > If you want the actual tidal predictions for a non-ideal Earth and at a > particular real tidal station, it gets a little trickier. > > -- > Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
I can't visualize table 17.2 Also don't understand "important concepts" at the end of the chapter. a.. Tides have six fundamental frequencies. The tide is the superposition of hundreds of tidal constituents, each having a frequency that is the sum and difference of five fundamental frequencies. Reminds me of the function of a theremin which only uses 2 frequencies. Time to give up.
"Rich Webb" <bbew.ar@mapson.nozirev.ten> wrote in message 
news:540ig7dg8d4ageokmtl43jea1kp0880rp2@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 17:10:57 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn> > wrote: > >> >>"Rich Webb" <bbew.ar@mapson.nozirev.ten> wrote in message >>news:pfhhg7pqtlnrgeikchvl3ev4stqr5sktg8@4ax.com... >>> On Sat, 7 Jan 2012 12:42:01 -0800, "Stumpy" <perilmung@spamnet.corn> >>> wrote: >>> >>>> >>>>"Jasen Betts" <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in message >>>>news:jea6c4$4sl$1@reversiblemaps.ath.cx... >>>>> On 2012-01-07, Stumpy <perilmung@spamnet.corn> wrote: >>>>>> I was looking at a tide table to find minus tides during the daytime >>>>>> to >>>>>> go >>>>>> poke at creatures and I thought that the fairly regular wavelength >>>>>> would >>>>>> make some very boring music. If you sped up the frequency from days >>>>>> to >>>>>> kHz >>>>>> and had feet represent either volts delivered to a speaker, or actual >>>>>> sound >>>>>> waves you would hear something. Probably a very regular tone that >>>>>> varied >>>>>> more in volume than anything else, but you could always process the >>>>>> signal >>>>>> to make it more interesting. >>>>>> >>>>>> Would anyone have a hint for a scheme to capture online tide table >>>>>> data >>>>>> and >>>>>> then a (free)program to convert it to usable audio? I know this is a >>>>>> ridiculous project, but it's not a good day to go fishing. >>>>> >>>>>> http://www.san-diego-beaches-and-adventures.com/san-diego-tide-chart.html >>>>> >>>>> The graphs are jpegs, the tables too. and the tables don't have evenly >>>>> spaced samples. >>>>> >>>>> It's probably easier to find the generating function and use octave or >>>>> matlab or a spreadsheet or something like that to convert that to >>>>> samples that can be converted to wav. >>>>> >>>>> At ~1Khz 2012's data is going to get you <<1s of tone. >>>>> >>>>> >>>> >>>>I know the data has to come from elsewhere. 2 tides a day for 365 days >>>>would make a very short MP3 at 1kHz. It would take almost 7 years data >>>>to >>>>make a 5 minute "song". I bet NOAA has data from back quite a few >>>>years. >>> >>> Maybe Mr. Google can help? <clickety click> Yes! >>> <http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/ocng_textbook/chapter17/chapter17_04.htm> >>> >>> -- >>> Rich Webb Norfolk, VA >> >>Ha! If I could do math those formulas could feed an amp directly. I >>wonder if Octave or Matlab mentioned above can input formula 17.16? >> > > Aha! Take a look at > <http://www.math.sunysb.edu/~tony/tides/tidesounds.html> > > -- > Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
Holy crap - someone already did this. Thanks much for finding such a weird audio artifact. I can get back to whatever I was supposed to be doing.