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Noisy Phone (speaker?)

Started by W. eWatson December 14, 2011
We have a Panasonic cordless set of phones. In the last month, we've 
noted that occasionally the ringer (speaker, I suppose) sounds very 
rough. My wife finally put it on another circuit for nearly a month. No 
problems.

I think it's another device on the circuit that causes the problem. 
Here's what's on that circuit.

The kitchen circuit containing the phone plug includes:
1.  Kitchen outlets (but not lights) on the north wall, i.e., next to 
the half bath.  Includes refrigerator.
2.  Outlet over the dishwasher (gfci circuit).
3.  Outside plug on deck.
4.  Outlet in the kitchen
W. eWatson wrote:
> We have a Panasonic cordless set of phones. In the last month, we've > noted that occasionally the ringer (speaker, I suppose) sounds very > rough. My wife finally put it on another circuit for nearly a month. No > problems. > > I think it's another device on the circuit that causes the problem. > Here's what's on that circuit. > > The kitchen circuit containing the phone plug includes: > 1. Kitchen outlets (but not lights) on the north wall, i.e., next to the > half bath. Includes refrigerator. > 2. Outlet over the dishwasher (gfci circuit). > 3. Outside plug on deck. > 4. Outlet in the kitchen
Divide (by two) and conquer! Suggest place the phone unit back on the 'kitchen circuit'. * Confirm that the ringer still sounds rough even if you have to borrow a cell phone to call yourself. * Unplug the fridge and anything plugged into the kitchen outlets and the outlet on the deck. * Discover if the symptom is still present. If it is, unplug everything that remains, like the sink disposer the RO water purifier, the dish washer and test once more. * If the symptom disappeared, plug in the fridge and add the unplugged loads, testing once more for each device until the symptom reappears. * If the symptom is still present, turn off the 'kitchen circuit' at the breaker panel and disconnect the GFCI outlet. Tape off the wires and turn the circuit back on. Test once more. * If the symptom disappeared, consider the GFCI outlet and any additional outlets that it powers, in the kitchen *or elsewhere*. --Winston
On Dec 14, 6:57=A0pm, Winston <Wins...@BigBrother.net> wrote:
> W. eWatson wrote: > > We have a Panasonic cordless set of phones. In the last month, we've > > noted that occasionally the ringer (speaker, I suppose) sounds very > > rough. My wife finally put it on another circuit for nearly a month. No > > problems. > > > I think it's another device on the circuit that causes the problem. > > Here's what's on that circuit. > > > The kitchen circuit containing the phone plug includes: > > 1. Kitchen outlets (but not lights) on the north wall, i.e., next to th=
e
> > half bath. Includes refrigerator. > > 2. Outlet over the dishwasher (gfci circuit). > > 3. Outside plug on deck. > > 4. Outlet in the kitchen > > Divide (by two) and conquer! > > Suggest place the phone unit back on the > 'kitchen circuit'. > > * Confirm that the ringer still sounds rough > =A0 =A0even if you have to borrow a cell phone to > =A0 =A0call yourself. > > * Unplug the fridge and anything plugged into > =A0 =A0the kitchen outlets and the outlet on the > =A0 =A0deck. > > * Discover if the symptom is still present. > =A0 =A0If it is, unplug everything that remains, like > =A0 =A0the sink disposer the RO water purifier, > =A0 =A0the dish washer and test once more. > > * If the symptom disappeared, plug in the > =A0 =A0fridge and add the unplugged loads, testing > =A0 =A0once more for each device until the symptom > =A0 =A0reappears. > > * If the symptom is still present, > =A0 =A0turn off the 'kitchen circuit' at > =A0 =A0the breaker panel and disconnect the GFCI > =A0 =A0outlet. =A0Tape off the wires and turn the > =A0 =A0circuit back on. =A0Test once more. > > * If the symptom disappeared, consider the > =A0 =A0GFCI outlet and any additional outlets > =A0 =A0that it powers, in the kitchen *or elsewhere*. > > --Winston
An occasional problem, always the hardest to find. But how about the refrigerator. George H.
George Herold wrote:

(...)

> An occasional problem, always the hardest to find. > But how about the refrigerator.
You could test with the compressor running. Adjust the fridge control a couple degrees warmer than usual and let it settle at the higher temperature for a day or so. Tweak the control back down a couple degrees. After a short delay, the compressor will come on. That's when you call the answering machine and see if the fridge is the culprit. Also beware that this intermittent problem might be with the phone itself. :) Do other phones on the same line emit a distorted 'ring' sound? --Winston
On 12/14/2011 8:42 PM, Winston wrote:
> George Herold wrote: > > (...) > >> An occasional problem, always the hardest to find. >> But how about the refrigerator. > > You could test with the compressor running. > Adjust the fridge control a couple degrees > warmer than usual and let it settle at the > higher temperature for a day or so. > > Tweak the control back down a couple degrees. > After a short delay, the compressor will come > on. > > That's when you call the answering machine > and see if the fridge is the culprit. > > Also beware that this intermittent problem might > be with the phone itself. :) > > Do other phones on the same line emit > a distorted 'ring' sound? > > --Winston
The trouble with the unplugging the refrig is that the problem is somewhat intermittent. We'd have a lot of food spoilage.
"W. eWatson" wrote:
> > On 12/14/2011 8:42 PM, Winston wrote: > > George Herold wrote: > > > > (...) > > > >> An occasional problem, always the hardest to find. > >> But how about the refrigerator. > > > > You could test with the compressor running. > > Adjust the fridge control a couple degrees > > warmer than usual and let it settle at the > > higher temperature for a day or so. > > > > Tweak the control back down a couple degrees. > > After a short delay, the compressor will come > > on. > > > > That's when you call the answering machine > > and see if the fridge is the culprit. > > > > Also beware that this intermittent problem might > > be with the phone itself. :) > > > > Do other phones on the same line emit > > a distorted 'ring' sound? > > > > --Winston > The trouble with the unplugging the refrig is that the problem is > somewhat intermittent. We'd have a lot of food spoilage.
Then use a line splitter and put two phones on that phone jack. The problem may be in the phone company's SLIC. the ring signal no longer comes from the Central office. It is generated somewhere near your home, where a copper pair of fiber goes to the Central office. -- You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
W. eWatson wrote:

(...)

> The trouble with the unplugging the refrig is that the problem is > somewhat intermittent. We'd have a lot of food spoilage.
Do other phones on the same line emit a distorted 'ring' sound? --Winston