Forums

Are there 22.5v. batteries?

Started by Ramon F. Herrera November 27, 2011
I was looking at the schematics of the first transistor radio, the
Regency TR-1, and noticed that it uses a 22.5v. battery.

http://people.msoe.edu/~reyer/regency/schematic.jpg

Later models use a more normal battery such as 9v.

-Ramon
"Ramon F. Herrera"
> > I was looking at the schematics of the first transistor radio, the > Regency TR-1, and noticed that it uses a 22.5v. battery. > > http://people.msoe.edu/~reyer/regency/schematic.jpg > > Later models use a more normal battery such as 9v. >
** Ever heard of Google ?? http://people.msoe.edu/~reyer/regency/battery2.jpg ... Phil
On Nov 27, 6:03=A0pm, "Ramon F. Herrera" <ra...@conexus.net> wrote:
> I was looking at the schematics of the first transistor radio, the > Regency TR-1, and noticed that it uses a 22.5v. battery. > > http://people.msoe.edu/~reyer/regency/schematic.jpg > > Later models use a more normal battery such as 9v. > > -Ramon
They have one for sale on eBay for $800. I wonder whether it comes with battery, and most important whether it works... -Ramon ps: So, how common are 22.5v batteries these days? Never seen one above 9v.
On Sun, 27 Nov 2011 16:36:12 -0800 (PST), "Ramon F. Herrera"
<ramon@conexus.net> wrote:

>On Nov 27, 6:03&#2013266080;pm, "Ramon F. Herrera" <ra...@conexus.net> wrote: >> I was looking at the schematics of the first transistor radio, the >> Regency TR-1, and noticed that it uses a 22.5v. battery. >> >> http://people.msoe.edu/~reyer/regency/schematic.jpg >> >> Later models use a more normal battery such as 9v. >> >> -Ramon > >They have one for sale on eBay for $800. I wonder whether it comes >with battery, and most important whether it works... > >-Ramon > >ps: So, how common are 22.5v batteries these days? Never seen one >above 9v.
amazon.com stocks at least one: http://www.amazon.com/Energizer-Eveready-01362-EVR505-Carbon-Battery/dp/B000BQU72O/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1322441537&sr=8-1
<news@jecarter.us>

> > amazon.com stocks at least one: > http://www.amazon.com/Energizer-Eveready-01362-EVR505-Carbon-Battery/dp/B000BQU72O/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1322441537&sr=8-1 >
** Wrong size and shape. The Eveready 412 ( 22.5 V) is similar in size and shape to a regular 9V radio battery. Used in some analogue multimeters. .... Phil
news@jecarter.us wrote:
>"Ramon F. Herrera" <ramon@conexus.net> wrote: > >>"Ramon F. Herrera" wrote: >> >> ps: So, how common are 22.5v batteries these days? Never seen one >> above 9v. > > amazon.com stocks at least one: > http://www.amazon.com/Energizer-Eveready-01362-EVR505-Carbon-Battery/dp/B000BQU72O/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1322441537&sr=8-1
15V and 22.5V batteries used to be commonly used in professional quality analog multimeters for the higher ohms ranges. That would be right up till the late 80's. Specialist suppliers tend to still stock them - at a price. -- Ian Malcolm. London, ENGLAND. (NEWSGROUP REPLY PREFERRED) ianm[at]the[dash]malcolms[dot]freeserve[dot]co[dot]uk [at]=@, [dash]=- & [dot]=. *Warning* HTML & >32K emails --> NUL:
"Ramon F. Herrera" wrote:
> > On Nov 27, 6:03 pm, "Ramon F. Herrera" <ra...@conexus.net> wrote: > > I was looking at the schematics of the first transistor radio, the > > Regency TR-1, and noticed that it uses a 22.5v. battery. > > > > http://people.msoe.edu/~reyer/regency/schematic.jpg > > > > Later models use a more normal battery such as 9v. > > > > -Ramon > > They have one for sale on eBay for $800. I wonder whether it comes > with battery, and most important whether it works...
It is a collectable radio. It was Regency's first solid state radio and it's likely to have one or more bad transistors, plus bad electrolytics. Leave it for someone who collects & restores them, if you don't want to spend another $100 or more in parts & labor to make sure it works properly. -- You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
On Sun, 27 Nov 2011 16:36:12 -0800 (PST), "Ramon F. Herrera"
<ramon@conexus.net> wrote:

>ps: So, how common are 22.5v batteries these days? Never seen one >above 9v.
Scarcer than hen's teeth I'd imagine. Roll your own if you happen to need it - or build a voltage booster. 22.5V was the lower end of "B" batteries for portable radios using toobs. Regency just used what was already available - being transistor sets, they didn't really need (or want) that high a voltage or the expense of a HV multi cell battery. It was economical and logical to use what was already in production. I remember playing with 45 Volt and 90 Volt "B" batteries, and even one weirdo called 54.5 volts - and that doesn't compute to an even multiple of 1.5.
On Nov 28, 5:06=A0pm, default wrote:
> On Sun, 27 Nov 2011 16:36:12 -0800 (PST), "Ramon F. Herrera" > > <ra...@conexus.net> wrote: > >ps: So, how common are 22.5v batteries these days? Never seen one > >above 9v. > > Scarcer than hen's teeth I'd imagine. > > Roll your own if you happen to need it - or build a voltage booster. >
If you need battery power then go on eBay and search for "dc boost". There's plenty of adjustable ones that can output 22.5 volts from a more standard battery voltage.
On Nov 27, 6:36=A0pm, "Phil Allison" <phi...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
> "Ramon F. Herrera" > > > > > I was looking at the schematics of the first transistor radio, the > > Regency TR-1, and noticed that it uses a 22.5v. battery. > > >http://people.msoe.edu/~reyer/regency/schematic.jpg > > > Later models use a more normal battery such as 9v. >
> ** =A0Ever heard of Google =A0?? Do you know the name of the first software to go out and collect info on the web, for a search engine? In any event, this is what happened: I did a Google search of a "22 volt battery" and found nothing usable. I then realized that 22 is not divisible by 1.5 but still wanted to hear the comments of you kind folks. -Ramon