Reply by Whoey Louie January 3, 20202020-01-03
On Thursday, January 2, 2020 at 8:38:18 PM UTC-5, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
> Whoey Louie <trader4@optonline.net> wrote in news:5fefe6c9-17c4-4aee- > b5d9-88c9a1d47fea@googlegroups.com: > > > > > It's still current flowing. The point, which obviously went right > > over your head, is that in electrical engineering, when someone talks > > about a "current source", they typically mean that it behaves similar > > to an IDEAL CURRENT SOURCE. > > You contradict yourself.
No contradiction, you're just too stupid to understand it.
Reply by Whoey Louie January 3, 20202020-01-03
On Thursday, January 2, 2020 at 8:35:30 PM UTC-5, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
> Whoey Louie <trader4@optonline.net> wrote in news:5fefe6c9-17c4-4aee- > b5d9-88c9a1d47fea@googlegroups.com: > > > > > The time period is irrelevant of course. > > No, it is not. The very term "current" and "bolt" are mutually > exclusive when the end product is "work". Current connotes > constance.
Wrong again.
> > > Leave it to you to start > > squabbling though. > > The time period is NOT irrelevant.
Wrong again.
> > If it were useable for work, we would have huge lightning > capacitors down in Florida grabbing up the cloud juice so we could > put it to use over a longer period than a single strike event > > Lightning. It is electrostatic.
So what? Maxwell's equations still apply.
Reply by January 2, 20202020-01-02
Whoey Louie <trader4@optonline.net> wrote in news:5fefe6c9-17c4-4aee-
b5d9-88c9a1d47fea@googlegroups.com:

> > Thank you for all that, Capt Obvious. It added nothing. >
Fuck you, lightning retard. You add nothing, and your blather is inane.
Reply by January 2, 20202020-01-02
Whoey Louie <trader4@optonline.net> wrote in news:5fefe6c9-17c4-4aee-
b5d9-88c9a1d47fea@googlegroups.com:

>> I think you got confused over the years. Ideally, you should >> rehash the entire NEETS course, for starters. > > No confusion here. You're the one wandering in the wilderness. >
Too stupid to go look up what NEETS is, eh?
Reply by January 2, 20202020-01-02
Whoey Louie <trader4@optonline.net> wrote in news:5fefe6c9-17c4-4aee-
b5d9-88c9a1d47fea@googlegroups.com:

> > It's still current flowing. The point, which obviously went right > over your head, is that in electrical engineering, when someone talks > about a "current source", they typically mean that it behaves similar > to an IDEAL CURRENT SOURCE.
You contradict yourself.
> Otherwise what's the point to calling > something a current source?
You ain't real bright, boy.
Reply by January 2, 20202020-01-02
Whoey Louie <trader4@optonline.net> wrote in news:5fefe6c9-17c4-4aee-
b5d9-88c9a1d47fea@googlegroups.com:

> > The time period is irrelevant of course.
No, it is not. The very term "current" and "bolt" are mutually exclusive when the end product is "work". Current connotes constance.
> Leave it to you to start > squabbling though.
The time period is NOT irrelevant. If it were useable for work, we would have huge lightning capacitors down in Florida grabbing up the cloud juice so we could put it to use over a longer period than a single strike event Lightning. It is electrostatic.
Reply by Rick C January 2, 20202020-01-02
On Thursday, January 2, 2020 at 6:31:00 PM UTC-5, Jasen Betts wrote:
> On 2020-01-01, Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote: > > On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 5:01:13 PM UTC-5, Jasen Betts wrote: > > >> >> that's your limit, more spin won't get you more current. > >> > > >> > So is the alternator a current source or not? > >> > >> It's more like a current source than like a voltage source, in that > >> when open circuit it produces harmful voltages, but when shorted nothing > >> bad happens. > > > > I don't know that. > > still? was my explanation unclear? > > here's another way to think about it, imagine a gapped transformer > where the primary is fed with a constant AC current. the secondary is > going to see pretty-much the same as what the altenator stator sees. > > > I was simply saying that combining a rather large cap with the > > battery an alternator may produce excessive currents. > > pigs might fly.
If you say so. I will defer to your experience. -- Rick C. -++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging -++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
Reply by Jasen Betts January 2, 20202020-01-02
On 2020-01-01, Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 5:01:13 PM UTC-5, Jasen Betts wrote:
>> >> that's your limit, more spin won't get you more current. >> > >> > So is the alternator a current source or not? >> >> It's more like a current source than like a voltage source, in that >> when open circuit it produces harmful voltages, but when shorted nothing >> bad happens. > > I don't know that.
still? was my explanation unclear? here's another way to think about it, imagine a gapped transformer where the primary is fed with a constant AC current. the secondary is going to see pretty-much the same as what the altenator stator sees.
> I was simply saying that combining a rather large cap with the > battery an alternator may produce excessive currents.
pigs might fly. -- Jasen.
Reply by Whoey Louie January 2, 20202020-01-02
On Thursday, January 2, 2020 at 12:57:05 PM UTC-5, Rick C wrote:
> On Thursday, January 2, 2020 at 11:47:30 AM UTC-5, Whoey Louie wrote: > > On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 7:52:39 PM UTC-5, Rick C wrote: > > > On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 7:13:42 PM UTC-5, Whoey Louie wrote: > > > > On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 3:50:55 PM UTC-5, Rick C wrote: > > > > > On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 9:53:51 AM UTC-5, Whoey Louie wrote: > > > > > > On Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 7:33:42 PM UTC-5, Rick C wrote: > > > > > > > On Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 12:23:49 PM UTC-5, Whoey Louie wrote: > > > > > > > > On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 5:25:55 PM UTC-5, Rick C wrote: > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > If it is a current source, then it can be equated to a voltage source with a high value series resistor. > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Say what? The current would then decline rapidly with any applied load. > > > > > > > > That isn't a current source. > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Ok, if you say so Always Wrong. > > > > > > > > > > > > And what exactly was that about? A current source most definitely does not > > > > > > look anything like a voltage source with a high value resistor is series. > > > > > > > > > > Ok, so now rather than admit you were wrong and move on from there, you are retrenching by trying to ignore what you posted. > > > > > > > > > > You are so much like the Always Wrong who you love to scorn. > > > > > > > > > > -- > > > > > > > > > > Rick C. > > > > > > > > > > --- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging > > > > > --- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209 > > > > > > > > > > > > Heh genius. You claim that an auto alternator behaves like a current > > > > source with a high value resistor. I say you're full of baloney, it > > > > behaves like a VOLTAGE SOURCE. I can give you the model using a voltage > > > > source. Take an ideal voltage source of value 15V in series with a > > > > 0.025 resistor. With a load of 1 amp, the alternator puts out ~15V. > > > > With a load of 100 amps, it puts out 12.5V. > > > > > > > > Now provide us with the values for your current source and high value > > > > resistor that you claim model it. > > > > > > You need to read the posts you respond to as well as your own. I never made the claim you say I did. You meanwhile incorrectly said a current source is not equivalent to a voltage source in series with a high value resistance. > > > > > > Just read the posts quoted above. It's that simple, Always Wrong. > > > > > > -- > > > > > > Rick C. > > > > > > --+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging > > > --+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209 > > > > Let's recap: > > The recap is above. Just read that! > > > > You replied with: > > > > "If it is a current source, then it can be equated to a voltage source with a high value series resistor. " > > > > > > So, clearly you interpreted his post the same way I did, that he means > > it behaves like a ideal current source. Otherwise you would not have > > to say "if it's a current source", because we all know that there is > > current flowing in any alternator. > > Who cares? What Jason said is not relevant. > > > > And then you claimed that if it's a current source, then it can be > > equated with a voltage source in series with a high value resistor. > > Just think what that means. > > What's a "high value" resistor? 1K ohms? An alternator putting out > > 100 amps would then produce a voltage of 100kv across that resistor. > > Your voltage source wouldn't be 12 - 15V, it would have to be 100KV, > > across a 1K resistor, to give you a current source of 100A. The open > > circuit voltage would be 100KV. That sure isn't any car alternator > > I've ever seen. > > More divarication. > > > > The bottom line is an alternator/VR behaves similar to an ideal voltage > > source, it tries to maintain constant voltage, not constant current, > > which is what an ideal current source would do. And if you want to model > > it, you can do it with an ideal voltage source in series with a > > very low value resistor or you can do the Norton equivalent, which > > would be a current source with a very low value resistor in PARALLEL. > > I posted the quotes that were relevant. You are doing the typical Always Wrong thing of micro analyzing every word and twisting the conversation to suit your wants. > > I only responded that if he were talking about an ideal current source it could be modeled with the Th&eacute;venin equivalent. You replied... > > > > > > And what exactly was that about? A current source most definitely does not > > > > > look anything like a voltage source with a high value resistor is series. > > showing that you didn't understand or know nothing about Th&eacute;venin equivalents.
ROFL I know that the Thevenin model for an alternator isn't a voltage source in series with a high value resistor.
> Rick C. > > -+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging > -+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
How's that all that Tesla spamming working for you? Make any money yet?
Reply by Rick C January 2, 20202020-01-02
On Thursday, January 2, 2020 at 11:47:30 AM UTC-5, Whoey Louie wrote:
> On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 7:52:39 PM UTC-5, Rick C wrote: > > On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 7:13:42 PM UTC-5, Whoey Louie wrote: > > > On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 3:50:55 PM UTC-5, Rick C wrote: > > > > On Wednesday, January 1, 2020 at 9:53:51 AM UTC-5, Whoey Louie wrote: > > > > > On Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 7:33:42 PM UTC-5, Rick C wrote: > > > > > > On Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 12:23:49 PM UTC-5, Whoey Louie wrote: > > > > > > > On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 5:25:55 PM UTC-5, Rick C wrote: > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > If it is a current source, then it can be equated to a voltage source with a high value series resistor. > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Say what? The current would then decline rapidly with any applied load. > > > > > > > That isn't a current source. > > > > > > > > > > > > Ok, if you say so Always Wrong. > > > > > > > > > > And what exactly was that about? A current source most definitely does not > > > > > look anything like a voltage source with a high value resistor is series. > > > > > > > > Ok, so now rather than admit you were wrong and move on from there, you are retrenching by trying to ignore what you posted. > > > > > > > > You are so much like the Always Wrong who you love to scorn. > > > > > > > > -- > > > > > > > > Rick C. > > > > > > > > --- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging > > > > --- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209 > > > > > > > > > Heh genius. You claim that an auto alternator behaves like a current > > > source with a high value resistor. I say you're full of baloney, it > > > behaves like a VOLTAGE SOURCE. I can give you the model using a voltage > > > source. Take an ideal voltage source of value 15V in series with a > > > 0.025 resistor. With a load of 1 amp, the alternator puts out ~15V. > > > With a load of 100 amps, it puts out 12.5V. > > > > > > Now provide us with the values for your current source and high value > > > resistor that you claim model it. > > > > You need to read the posts you respond to as well as your own. I never made the claim you say I did. You meanwhile incorrectly said a current source is not equivalent to a voltage source in series with a high value resistance. > > > > Just read the posts quoted above. It's that simple, Always Wrong. > > > > -- > > > > Rick C. > > > > --+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging > > --+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209 > > Let's recap:
The recap is above. Just read that!
> You replied with: > > "If it is a current source, then it can be equated to a voltage source with a high value series resistor. " > > > So, clearly you interpreted his post the same way I did, that he means > it behaves like a ideal current source. Otherwise you would not have > to say "if it's a current source", because we all know that there is > current flowing in any alternator.
Who cares? What Jason said is not relevant.
> And then you claimed that if it's a current source, then it can be > equated with a voltage source in series with a high value resistor. > Just think what that means. > What's a "high value" resistor? 1K ohms? An alternator putting out > 100 amps would then produce a voltage of 100kv across that resistor. > Your voltage source wouldn't be 12 - 15V, it would have to be 100KV, > across a 1K resistor, to give you a current source of 100A. The open > circuit voltage would be 100KV. That sure isn't any car alternator > I've ever seen.
More divarication.
> The bottom line is an alternator/VR behaves similar to an ideal voltage > source, it tries to maintain constant voltage, not constant current, > which is what an ideal current source would do. And if you want to model > it, you can do it with an ideal voltage source in series with a > very low value resistor or you can do the Norton equivalent, which > would be a current source with a very low value resistor in PARALLEL.
I posted the quotes that were relevant. You are doing the typical Always Wrong thing of micro analyzing every word and twisting the conversation to suit your wants. I only responded that if he were talking about an ideal current source it could be modeled with the Th&eacute;venin equivalent. You replied...
> > > > And what exactly was that about? A current source most definitely does not > > > > look anything like a voltage source with a high value resistor is series.
showing that you didn't understand or know nothing about Th&eacute;venin equivalents. Why not just give up and stop back peddling? Whatever. I generally treat you the same as DLNU, I ignore you both. I'm not sure why I responded. Guess I'm over this pointless discussion with you. Just like Always Wrong you can't admit when you make a mistake, Always Wronger. -- Rick C. -+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging -+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209