Posted by Steve Wilson July 14, 2018
On Friday, July 13, 2018 at 11:44:03 PM UTC-4, George Herold wrote:
> On Friday, July 13, 2018 at 6:52:37 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote: > > On Friday, July 13, 2018 at 9:46:27 AM UTC-4, George Herold wrote: > > > On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 11:00:33 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote: > > [..] > > > > > > If a population crashes, I don't see how it can recover. Enjoy your birds
while you can, and monitor your spider webs.
> > > > > Hmm well it may be just local... and animals can drift in from the > > > surroundings slowly. If you are really interested you might talk with > > > some local wildlife experts.. (Audubon society, park rangers, > > > conservationists.) They might have some idea of what's going on. > > > > > George H. > > > > It's all over southern Ontario. I recently did a tour looking for another place
to live. All the way to London, up to Wiarton (I got lost) across to Waterloo, up to Orangeville, then to Barrie and back home. Not one bug, not one bird on the entire trip.
> > > > I frequently take trips to Barrie (45 minute drive south). No bugs, no birds. > > > > I took a drive to Elmvale for lunch today. Ace Grill - best fish and chips this
side of heaven. 25 minute drive. No bugs, no birds.
> > > > I'm not talking about animals. They are hard to see. I think the smaller ones
feed on insects, and are eaten by the larger ones.
> > > > I don't see how bugs can drift back in if there are none anywhere. > > > > Good suggestions on contacts. When I get time I'll search. > > > > Thanks > > Hmm, searching for "no bugs southern Ontario 2018" all I get > are bug reports... > In Huntsville all bugs are at medium levels. > (whatever that means) > > http://bbm.theweathernetwork.com/bugreport/caon0314 > > George H.
Black flies and deer flies are not normally found in Southern Ontario farming areas. They are more associated with wilderness areas. Look where Huntsville is located: https://www.tripadvisor.ca/LocalMaps-g2422820-Georgian_Bay-Area.html Huntsville is way up in the wilderness, a long way from farming country. This adds weight to the argument that insecticide vapor from farms is killing the bugs. Insecticide is sprayed on crops. If it is that powerful, then what are we eating? I searched for 'bug report southern Ontario 2018' (no quotes) and got lots of hits but nothing useful.
Posted by George Herold July 14, 2018
On Friday, July 13, 2018 at 6:52:37 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote:
> On Friday, July 13, 2018 at 9:46:27 AM UTC-4, George Herold wrote: > > On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 11:00:33 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote: > [..] > > > > If a population crashes, I don't see how it can recover. Enjoy your birds
while you can, and monitor your spider webs.
> > > Hmm well it may be just local... and animals can drift in from the > > surroundings slowly. If you are really interested you might talk with > > some local wildlife experts.. (Audubon society, park rangers, > > conservationists.) They might have some idea of what's going on. > > > George H. > > It's all over southern Ontario. I recently did a tour looking for another place to
live. All the way to London, up to Wiarton (I got lost) across to Waterloo, up to Orangeville, then to Barrie and back home. Not one bug, not one bird on the entire trip.
> > I frequently take trips to Barrie (45 minute drive south). No bugs, no birds. > > I took a drive to Elmvale for lunch today. Ace Grill - best fish and chips this
side of heaven. 25 minute drive. No bugs, no birds.
> > I'm not talking about animals. They are hard to see. I think the smaller ones feed
on insects, and are eaten by the larger ones.
> > I don't see how bugs can drift back in if there are none anywhere. > > Good suggestions on contacts. When I get time I'll search. > > Thanks
Hmm, searching for "no bugs southern Ontario 2018" all I get are bug reports... In Huntsville all bugs are at medium levels. (whatever that means) http://bbm.theweathernetwork.com/bugreport/caon0314 George H.
Posted by Steve Wilson July 13, 2018
On Friday, July 13, 2018 at 9:46:27 AM UTC-4, George Herold wrote:
> On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 11:00:33 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote:
[..]
> > If a population crashes, I don't see how it can recover. Enjoy your birds while
you can, and monitor your spider webs.
> Hmm well it may be just local... and animals can drift in from the > surroundings slowly. If you are really interested you might talk with > some local wildlife experts.. (Audubon society, park rangers, > conservationists.) They might have some idea of what's going on.
> George H.
It's all over southern Ontario. I recently did a tour looking for another place to live. All the way to London, up to Wiarton (I got lost) across to Waterloo, up to Orangeville, then to Barrie and back home. Not one bug, not one bird on the entire trip. I frequently take trips to Barrie (45 minute drive south). No bugs, no birds. I took a drive to Elmvale for lunch today. Ace Grill - best fish and chips this side of heaven. 25 minute drive. No bugs, no birds. I'm not talking about animals. They are hard to see. I think the smaller ones feed on insects, and are eaten by the larger ones. I don't see how bugs can drift back in if there are none anywhere. Good suggestions on contacts. When I get time I'll search. Thanks
Posted by George Herold July 13, 2018
On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 11:00:33 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote:
> On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 11:39:26 AM UTC-4, George Herold wrote: > > On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 1:20:33 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote: > > > On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 12:30:58 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > > > On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 02:30:30 -0700 (PDT), Steve Wilson > > > > <9fe142ac@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > > > > > >On Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > > > >> On Wed, 20 Jun 2018 20:30:14 -0700, Robert Baer > > > > >> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: > > > > > > > > > >> >>
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/06/20/study-bugs-hate-light-at-night-more-than-climate-change/
> > > > >> >* "Scientists should pay greater attention to this factor when exploring
> > > > >> >the causes of insect population declines in the future." > > > > >> > I say, "WAKE UP!" .. what about the poor birds that feed on those > > > > >> >insects? > > > > > > > > > >> They will just hang out around the lamps. > > > > > > > > > >> John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > > > > > > > > > >> lunatic fringe electronics > > > > > > > > > >There are no bugs. We have several high intensity lamps that run all night
to illuminate parking lots for surveillance cameras. Normally they were ccovered with swarms of bugs. Now there are none.
> > > > > > > > > >We used to have spiders building webs in every nook and cranny. Now there
are none.
> > > > > > > > > >I used to have problems with tiny gnats that could easily slip through
window screens and dance around my overhead lights. Their bodies would litter my workbench in the morning. Now there are none.
> > > > > > > > > >I have seen one mosquito all summer. It was so weak and feeble it was easy
to kill.
> > > > > > > > > >We used to have flights of ducks flying in V-formation and honking. Now
there are none. Ducks feed on grass so they are not affected by loss of insects.
> > > > > > > > > >I may see only one or two birds each day. Most are gone. > > > > > > > > > > > > > The damned things make it hard to sleep in. We have hawks, ravens, > > > > owls, pigeons, hummers, bluejays, mockingbirds, and zillions of small > > > > stuff that I don't know the name of. Seagulls walk on the roof above > > > > my office, and they are noisy. At outdoor-seating restaurants, there > > > > are usually a few small birds policing for crumbs. We get huge > > > > migratory flocks in the wet flyways, like around the rice fields near > > > > Yolo Causeway. > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >There used to be lots of wasps feeding on flowers. Now there are none. > > > > > > > > Bees chase Mo out of our garden. We used to keep a couple of hives, > > > > but she got stung once and had a systemic reaction. The doctor said > > > > "Get rid of the bees or die." > > > > > > > > There is an active beekeeper community in San Francisco. > > > > > > > > As discussed elsewhere, it's hard to trust "scientific" studies. > > > > Especially the gloom-and-doom ones, which are mostly what we see. > > > > > > > > > > > > -- > > > > > > > > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk > > > > > > > > jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com > > > > http://www.highlandtechnology.com > > > > > > You have bugs. We had bugs last year. Now we have none. > > > > > > You have birds. We had lots of birds last year. Now we have very few. No
pigeons. Lots of seagulls. Why the difference?
> > > > > > Where did the ducks go? They eat grass, not insects. We have lots of grass. > > > > > > What is happening to wipe out so many species, and what prevents it from going
to your area?
> > > > Where do you live Steve? I've still got plenty of bugs. > > Well, there have been very few honey bees in the last few year. > > There use to be a few hives in our woods, but they are now gone/ dead. > > (Kinda a known problem) > > > > We have lots of other bees/ wasps etc. > > (The carpenter bees are a pest in my barn, but I've found they > > don't like spray paint... I spray paint the wood / hole and they > > move on to some other piece of wood.) > > > > George H. > > Congrats on your solution to the MOSFET IDSS problem. That was hilarious and made
me laugh. So much for the SPICE gurus. Hmm.. just hunt and peck.. I tried changing some other parameters first.
> > I live in Midland, Ontario. It is on the southeastern tip of Georgian Bay, and is
a two hour drive north of Toronto. It is far from the Toronto smog that makes me so sick.
> > Midland is a small tourist town in the middle of cottage country. It is basically
surrounded by water and forests. Here is a map:
> > https://www.tripadvisor.ca/LocalMaps-g2422820-Georgian_Bay-Area.html
Nice... Back in my youth I took a canoe trip in Killarney Provincial Park. I still have very fond memories.
> > There is not much farming nearby. This weakens the argument that the loss of bugs
is due to insecticide vapor drifting in the wind.
> > I first noticed the loss of birds long ago. Each year the morning chorus seemed to
be fading. I assumed it was because the birds were moving further away from the city center to the outskirts where there are more trees. I now know it was because the birds were dying.
> > Spider webs are a good indication of the level of flying insects. These in turn
tell much about the population of other ground based insects. If there are fewer spider webs, we can assume the insect population is decreasing, and the bird population will also decrease. Birds need a high protein insect diet during mating season. If there are no insects, birds will have a hard time surviving let alone feeding their young.
> > Last year was the last time there was a reasonable insect and bird population.
This year there are no spider webs and very few birds.
> > If a population crashes, I don't see how it can recover. Enjoy your birds while
you can, and monitor your spider webs. Hmm well it may be just local... and animals can drift in from the surroundings slowly. If you are really interested you might talk with some local wildlife experts.. (Audubon society, park rangers, conservationists.) They might have some idea of what's going on. George H.
Posted by July 13, 2018
On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 8:33:20 PM UTC-4, George Herold wrote:
> On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 4:41:48 PM UTC-4, gnuarm.del...@gmail.com wrote: > > On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 11:39:26 AM UTC-4, George Herold wrote: > > > > > > We have lots of other bees/ wasps etc. > > > (The carpenter bees are a pest in my barn, but I've found they > > > don't like spray paint... I spray paint the wood / hole and they > > > move on to some other piece of wood.) > > > > I have to say I'm not seeing nearly as many bugs lately. I keep a porch light
on much of the night and the spiders would set up camp near them to catch their belly full of bugs each night. Now I'm not seeing the bugs and I'm not seeing the spiders.
> > > > Just one data point, but these guys have been around for 30 years. > > > > Rick C. > > Hmm, OK. I'll leave the outside lights on and check later.... > that's easier later in the summer when the sun sets earlier. > It's 8:30 here now, twilight is coming but ~2 hours till it's dark, > (I'll be in bed.) (I live in the back half of the Eastern time zone. > life's good on the trailing edge. :^) > > We don't have bats living in the barn anymore. > I miss the bats. (Even with the bat poop.)
While letting a cat out I realized there may be a simple explanation to the apparent bug issue here. We had the wettest spring I've ever seen. I think we didn't have two sunny days in a row in two months along with multiple rains causing flooding. That may well have had some significant impact on the insect population. It certainly was unusual. Rick C.
Posted by Steve Wilson July 13, 2018
On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 11:39:26 AM UTC-4, George Herold wrote:
> On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 1:20:33 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote: > > On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 12:30:58 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > > On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 02:30:30 -0700 (PDT), Steve Wilson > > > <9fe142ac@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > > > >On Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > > >> On Wed, 20 Jun 2018 20:30:14 -0700, Robert Baer > > > >> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: > > > > > > > >> >>
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/06/20/study-bugs-hate-light-at-night-more-than-climate-change/
> > > >> >* "Scientists should pay greater attention to this factor when exploring > > > >> >the causes of insect population declines in the future." > > > >> > I say, "WAKE UP!" .. what about the poor birds that feed on those > > > >> >insects? > > > > > > > >> They will just hang out around the lamps. > > > > > > > >> John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > > > > > > > >> lunatic fringe electronics > > > > > > > >There are no bugs. We have several high intensity lamps that run all night to
illuminate parking lots for surveillance cameras. Normally they were ccovered with swarms of bugs. Now there are none.
> > > > > > > >We used to have spiders building webs in every nook and cranny. Now there are
none.
> > > > > > > >I used to have problems with tiny gnats that could easily slip through window
screens and dance around my overhead lights. Their bodies would litter my workbench in the morning. Now there are none.
> > > > > > > >I have seen one mosquito all summer. It was so weak and feeble it was easy to
kill.
> > > > > > > >We used to have flights of ducks flying in V-formation and honking. Now there
are none. Ducks feed on grass so they are not affected by loss of insects.
> > > > > > > >I may see only one or two birds each day. Most are gone. > > > > > > > > > > The damned things make it hard to sleep in. We have hawks, ravens, > > > owls, pigeons, hummers, bluejays, mockingbirds, and zillions of small > > > stuff that I don't know the name of. Seagulls walk on the roof above > > > my office, and they are noisy. At outdoor-seating restaurants, there > > > are usually a few small birds policing for crumbs. We get huge > > > migratory flocks in the wet flyways, like around the rice fields near > > > Yolo Causeway. > > > > > > > > > > > > >There used to be lots of wasps feeding on flowers. Now there are none. > > > > > > Bees chase Mo out of our garden. We used to keep a couple of hives, > > > but she got stung once and had a systemic reaction. The doctor said > > > "Get rid of the bees or die." > > > > > > There is an active beekeeper community in San Francisco. > > > > > > As discussed elsewhere, it's hard to trust "scientific" studies. > > > Especially the gloom-and-doom ones, which are mostly what we see. > > > > > > > > > -- > > > > > > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk > > > > > > jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com > > > http://www.highlandtechnology.com > > > > You have bugs. We had bugs last year. Now we have none. > > > > You have birds. We had lots of birds last year. Now we have very few. No
pigeons. Lots of seagulls. Why the difference?
> > > > Where did the ducks go? They eat grass, not insects. We have lots of grass. > > > > What is happening to wipe out so many species, and what prevents it from going
to your area?
> > Where do you live Steve? I've still got plenty of bugs. > Well, there have been very few honey bees in the last few year. > There use to be a few hives in our woods, but they are now gone/ dead. > (Kinda a known problem) > > We have lots of other bees/ wasps etc. > (The carpenter bees are a pest in my barn, but I've found they > don't like spray paint... I spray paint the wood / hole and they > move on to some other piece of wood.) > > George H.
Congrats on your solution to the MOSFET IDSS problem. That was hilarious and made me laugh. So much for the SPICE gurus. I live in Midland, Ontario. It is on the southeastern tip of Georgian Bay, and is a two hour drive north of Toronto. It is far from the Toronto smog that makes me so sick. Midland is a small tourist town in the middle of cottage country. It is basically surrounded by water and forests. Here is a map: https://www.tripadvisor.ca/LocalMaps-g2422820-Georgian_Bay-Area.html There is not much farming nearby. This weakens the argument that the loss of bugs is due to insecticide vapor drifting in the wind. I first noticed the loss of birds long ago. Each year the morning chorus seemed to be fading. I assumed it was because the birds were moving further away from the city center to the outskirts where there are more trees. I now know it was because the birds were dying. Spider webs are a good indication of the level of flying insects. These in turn tell much about the population of other ground based insects. If there are fewer spider webs, we can assume the insect population is decreasing, and the bird population will also decrease. Birds need a high protein insect diet during mating season. If there are no insects, birds will have a hard time surviving let alone feeding their young. Last year was the last time there was a reasonable insect and bird population. This year there are no spider webs and very few birds. If a population crashes, I don't see how it can recover. Enjoy your birds while you can, and monitor your spider webs.
Posted by George Herold July 12, 2018
On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 4:41:48 PM UTC-4, gnuarm.del...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 11:39:26 AM UTC-4, George Herold wrote: > > On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 1:20:33 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote: > > > On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 12:30:58 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > > > On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 02:30:30 -0700 (PDT), Steve Wilson > > > > <9fe142ac@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > > > > > >On Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > > > >> On Wed, 20 Jun 2018 20:30:14 -0700, Robert Baer > > > > >> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: > > > > > > > > > >> >>
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/06/20/study-bugs-hate-light-at-night-more-than-climate-change/
> > > > >> >* "Scientists should pay greater attention to this factor when exploring
> > > > >> >the causes of insect population declines in the future." > > > > >> > I say, "WAKE UP!" .. what about the poor birds that feed on those > > > > >> >insects? > > > > > > > > > >> They will just hang out around the lamps. > > > > > > > > > >> John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > > > > > > > > > >> lunatic fringe electronics > > > > > > > > > >There are no bugs. We have several high intensity lamps that run all night
to illuminate parking lots for surveillance cameras. Normally they were ccovered with swarms of bugs. Now there are none.
> > > > > > > > > >We used to have spiders building webs in every nook and cranny. Now there
are none.
> > > > > > > > > >I used to have problems with tiny gnats that could easily slip through
window screens and dance around my overhead lights. Their bodies would litter my workbench in the morning. Now there are none.
> > > > > > > > > >I have seen one mosquito all summer. It was so weak and feeble it was easy
to kill.
> > > > > > > > > >We used to have flights of ducks flying in V-formation and honking. Now
there are none. Ducks feed on grass so they are not affected by loss of insects.
> > > > > > > > > >I may see only one or two birds each day. Most are gone. > > > > > > > > > > > > > The damned things make it hard to sleep in. We have hawks, ravens, > > > > owls, pigeons, hummers, bluejays, mockingbirds, and zillions of small > > > > stuff that I don't know the name of. Seagulls walk on the roof above > > > > my office, and they are noisy. At outdoor-seating restaurants, there > > > > are usually a few small birds policing for crumbs. We get huge > > > > migratory flocks in the wet flyways, like around the rice fields near > > > > Yolo Causeway. > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >There used to be lots of wasps feeding on flowers. Now there are none. > > > > > > > > Bees chase Mo out of our garden. We used to keep a couple of hives, > > > > but she got stung once and had a systemic reaction. The doctor said > > > > "Get rid of the bees or die." > > > > > > > > There is an active beekeeper community in San Francisco. > > > > > > > > As discussed elsewhere, it's hard to trust "scientific" studies. > > > > Especially the gloom-and-doom ones, which are mostly what we see. > > > > > > > > > > > > -- > > > > > > > > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk > > > > > > > > jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com > > > > http://www.highlandtechnology.com > > > > > > You have bugs. We had bugs last year. Now we have none. > > > > > > You have birds. We had lots of birds last year. Now we have very few. No
pigeons. Lots of seagulls. Why the difference?
> > > > > > Where did the ducks go? They eat grass, not insects. We have lots of grass. > > > > > > What is happening to wipe out so many species, and what prevents it from going
to your area?
> > > > Where do you live Steve? I've still got plenty of bugs. > > Well, there have been very few honey bees in the last few year. > > There use to be a few hives in our woods, but they are now gone/ dead. > > (Kinda a known problem) > > > > We have lots of other bees/ wasps etc. > > (The carpenter bees are a pest in my barn, but I've found they > > don't like spray paint... I spray paint the wood / hole and they > > move on to some other piece of wood.) > > I have to say I'm not seeing nearly as many bugs lately. I keep a porch light on
much of the night and the spiders would set up camp near them to catch their belly full of bugs each night. Now I'm not seeing the bugs and I'm not seeing the spiders.
> > Just one data point, but these guys have been around for 30 years. > > Rick C.
Hmm, OK. I'll leave the outside lights on and check later.... that's easier later in the summer when the sun sets earlier. It's 8:30 here now, twilight is coming but ~2 hours till it's dark, (I'll be in bed.) (I live in the back half of the Eastern time zone. life's good on the trailing edge. :^) We don't have bats living in the barn anymore. I miss the bats. (Even with the bat poop.) George H.
Posted by July 12, 2018
On Thursday, July 12, 2018 at 11:39:26 AM UTC-4, George Herold wrote:
> On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 1:20:33 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote: > > On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 12:30:58 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > > On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 02:30:30 -0700 (PDT), Steve Wilson > > > <9fe142ac@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > > > >On Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > > >> On Wed, 20 Jun 2018 20:30:14 -0700, Robert Baer > > > >> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: > > > > > > > >> >>
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/06/20/study-bugs-hate-light-at-night-more-than-climate-change/
> > > >> >* "Scientists should pay greater attention to this factor when exploring > > > >> >the causes of insect population declines in the future." > > > >> > I say, "WAKE UP!" .. what about the poor birds that feed on those > > > >> >insects? > > > > > > > >> They will just hang out around the lamps. > > > > > > > >> John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > > > > > > > >> lunatic fringe electronics > > > > > > > >There are no bugs. We have several high intensity lamps that run all night to
illuminate parking lots for surveillance cameras. Normally they were ccovered with swarms of bugs. Now there are none.
> > > > > > > >We used to have spiders building webs in every nook and cranny. Now there are
none.
> > > > > > > >I used to have problems with tiny gnats that could easily slip through window
screens and dance around my overhead lights. Their bodies would litter my workbench in the morning. Now there are none.
> > > > > > > >I have seen one mosquito all summer. It was so weak and feeble it was easy to
kill.
> > > > > > > >We used to have flights of ducks flying in V-formation and honking. Now there
are none. Ducks feed on grass so they are not affected by loss of insects.
> > > > > > > >I may see only one or two birds each day. Most are gone. > > > > > > > > > > The damned things make it hard to sleep in. We have hawks, ravens, > > > owls, pigeons, hummers, bluejays, mockingbirds, and zillions of small > > > stuff that I don't know the name of. Seagulls walk on the roof above > > > my office, and they are noisy. At outdoor-seating restaurants, there > > > are usually a few small birds policing for crumbs. We get huge > > > migratory flocks in the wet flyways, like around the rice fields near > > > Yolo Causeway. > > > > > > > > > > > > >There used to be lots of wasps feeding on flowers. Now there are none. > > > > > > Bees chase Mo out of our garden. We used to keep a couple of hives, > > > but she got stung once and had a systemic reaction. The doctor said > > > "Get rid of the bees or die." > > > > > > There is an active beekeeper community in San Francisco. > > > > > > As discussed elsewhere, it's hard to trust "scientific" studies. > > > Especially the gloom-and-doom ones, which are mostly what we see. > > > > > > > > > -- > > > > > > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk > > > > > > jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com > > > http://www.highlandtechnology.com > > > > You have bugs. We had bugs last year. Now we have none. > > > > You have birds. We had lots of birds last year. Now we have very few. No
pigeons. Lots of seagulls. Why the difference?
> > > > Where did the ducks go? They eat grass, not insects. We have lots of grass. > > > > What is happening to wipe out so many species, and what prevents it from going
to your area?
> > Where do you live Steve? I've still got plenty of bugs. > Well, there have been very few honey bees in the last few year. > There use to be a few hives in our woods, but they are now gone/ dead. > (Kinda a known problem) > > We have lots of other bees/ wasps etc. > (The carpenter bees are a pest in my barn, but I've found they > don't like spray paint... I spray paint the wood / hole and they > move on to some other piece of wood.)
I have to say I'm not seeing nearly as many bugs lately. I keep a porch light on much of the night and the spiders would set up camp near them to catch their belly full of bugs each night. Now I'm not seeing the bugs and I'm not seeing the spiders. Just one data point, but these guys have been around for 30 years. Rick C.
Posted by George Herold July 12, 2018
On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 1:20:33 PM UTC-4, Steve Wilson wrote:
> On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 12:30:58 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 02:30:30 -0700 (PDT), Steve Wilson > > <9fe142ac@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > >On Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > >> On Wed, 20 Jun 2018 20:30:14 -0700, Robert Baer > > >> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: > > > > > >> >>
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/06/20/study-bugs-hate-light-at-night-more-than-climate-change/
> > >> >* "Scientists should pay greater attention to this factor when exploring > > >> >the causes of insect population declines in the future." > > >> > I say, "WAKE UP!" .. what about the poor birds that feed on those > > >> >insects? > > > > > >> They will just hang out around the lamps. > > > > > >> John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > > > > > >> lunatic fringe electronics > > > > > >There are no bugs. We have several high intensity lamps that run all night to
illuminate parking lots for surveillance cameras. Normally they were ccovered with swarms of bugs. Now there are none.
> > > > > >We used to have spiders building webs in every nook and cranny. Now there are
none.
> > > > > >I used to have problems with tiny gnats that could easily slip through window
screens and dance around my overhead lights. Their bodies would litter my workbench in the morning. Now there are none.
> > > > > >I have seen one mosquito all summer. It was so weak and feeble it was easy to
kill.
> > > > > >We used to have flights of ducks flying in V-formation and honking. Now there
are none. Ducks feed on grass so they are not affected by loss of insects.
> > > > > >I may see only one or two birds each day. Most are gone. > > > > > > > The damned things make it hard to sleep in. We have hawks, ravens, > > owls, pigeons, hummers, bluejays, mockingbirds, and zillions of small > > stuff that I don't know the name of. Seagulls walk on the roof above > > my office, and they are noisy. At outdoor-seating restaurants, there > > are usually a few small birds policing for crumbs. We get huge > > migratory flocks in the wet flyways, like around the rice fields near > > Yolo Causeway. > > > > > > > > >There used to be lots of wasps feeding on flowers. Now there are none. > > > > Bees chase Mo out of our garden. We used to keep a couple of hives, > > but she got stung once and had a systemic reaction. The doctor said > > "Get rid of the bees or die." > > > > There is an active beekeeper community in San Francisco. > > > > As discussed elsewhere, it's hard to trust "scientific" studies. > > Especially the gloom-and-doom ones, which are mostly what we see. > > > > > > -- > > > > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk > > > > jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com > > http://www.highlandtechnology.com > > You have bugs. We had bugs last year. Now we have none. > > You have birds. We had lots of birds last year. Now we have very few. No pigeons.
Lots of seagulls. Why the difference?
> > Where did the ducks go? They eat grass, not insects. We have lots of grass. > > What is happening to wipe out so many species, and what prevents it from going to
your area? Where do you live Steve? I've still got plenty of bugs. Well, there have been very few honey bees in the last few year. There use to be a few hives in our woods, but they are now gone/ dead. (Kinda a known problem) We have lots of other bees/ wasps etc. (The carpenter bees are a pest in my barn, but I've found they don't like spray paint... I spray paint the wood / hole and they move on to some other piece of wood.) George H.
Posted by July 9, 2018
On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 7:20:33 PM UTC+2, Steve Wilson wrote:
> On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 12:30:58 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 02:30:30 -0700 (PDT), Steve Wilson > > <9fe142ac@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > >On Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote: > > >> On Wed, 20 Jun 2018 20:30:14 -0700, Robert Baer > > >> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: > > > > > >> >>
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/06/20/study-bugs-hate-light-at-night-more-than-climate-change/
> > >> >* "Scientists should pay greater attention to this factor when exploring > > >> >the causes of insect population declines in the future." > > >> > I say, "WAKE UP!" .. what about the poor birds that feed on those > > >> >insects? > > > > > >> They will just hang out around the lamps. > > > > > >> John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > > > > > >> lunatic fringe electronics > > > > > >There are no bugs. We have several high intensity lamps that run all night to
illuminate parking lots for surveillance cameras. Normally they were ccovered with swarms of bugs. Now there are none.
> > > > > >We used to have spiders building webs in every nook and cranny. Now there are
none.
> > > > > >I used to have problems with tiny gnats that could easily slip through window
screens and dance around my overhead lights. Their bodies would litter my workbench in the morning. Now there are none.
> > > > > >I have seen one mosquito all summer. It was so weak and feeble it was easy to
kill.
> > > > > >We used to have flights of ducks flying in V-formation and honking. Now there
are none. Ducks feed on grass so they are not affected by loss of insects.
> > > > > >I may see only one or two birds each day. Most are gone. > > > > > > > The damned things make it hard to sleep in. We have hawks, ravens, > > owls, pigeons, hummers, bluejays, mockingbirds, and zillions of small > > stuff that I don't know the name of. Seagulls walk on the roof above > > my office, and they are noisy. At outdoor-seating restaurants, there > > are usually a few small birds policing for crumbs. We get huge > > migratory flocks in the wet flyways, like around the rice fields near > > Yolo Causeway. > > > > > > > > >There used to be lots of wasps feeding on flowers. Now there are none. > > > > Bees chase Mo out of our garden. We used to keep a couple of hives, > > but she got stung once and had a systemic reaction. The doctor said > > "Get rid of the bees or die." > > > > There is an active beekeeper community in San Francisco. > > > > As discussed elsewhere, it's hard to trust "scientific" studies. > > Especially the gloom-and-doom ones, which are mostly what we see. > > > > > > -- > > > > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk > > > > jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com > > http://www.highlandtechnology.com > > You have bugs. We had bugs last year. Now we have none. > > You have birds. We had lots of birds last year. Now we have very few. No pigeons.
Lots of seagulls. Why the difference?
> > Where did the ducks go? They eat grass, not insects. We have lots of grass. > > What is happening to wipe out so many species, and what prevents it from going to
your area? Scott Pruitt has now stopped being head of the EPA, but Trump does seem to have installed him to move the agency's focus away from protecting to environment more towards protecting the environment as much as possible while still letting people make money. I wouldn't be in the least surprised if some large agribusiness has started using a lot more insecticide in the past year or so. -- Bill Sloman, Sydney