Reply by Don Y November 20, 20132013-11-20
Hi Matt,

On 11/19/2013 11:36 PM, mroberds@att.net wrote:

>>> Yep. I secretly run People's Shining Transistor Factory #18. Did >>> you know that a TO-92 fits inside a TO-3 shell really well? :) >> >> Ah, that explains why the shipping charges are so low!!! :-/ >> And, why some of them RATTLE when shaken! > > Yeah, we had a bad batch of fake 2N2955s. Zhang had a bad week; 12- > year-olds can be so moody. We cut his pay by half for a few days; > he straightened up and we saved 25 cents US. > >> How are you fixed for supplying high quality *tea* leaves?? ;) > > We use tea leaves to fill up the extra space in the TO-3 cans! Run one > of them at high currents and a fresh tea scent will appear, for your > beautiful time.
Ah, that explains all this silver "hairs" I've been finding in my bulk tea! I had thought they *were* hairs -- annoying to keep have to pick them out of my teeth with each sip! But, obviously, they must be BONDING WIRES and the tea I've been buying must be the SCRAP you discard from failed unit test!! Now that I'm aware of what they *actually* are, I'll start setting them aside for you... hate to see all that material go to waste!
Reply by November 20, 20132013-11-20
Don Y <this@isnotme.com> wrote:
> Hi Matt, > On 11/17/2013 8:46 AM, mroberds@att.net wrote: >> Don Y <This.is@not.me> wrote: >> >>> <grin> I notice all the "house numbers" are of the form MRI#### >>> [Matt Roberds Industries? :>] >> >> Yep. I secretly run People's Shining Transistor Factory #18. Did >> you know that a TO-92 fits inside a TO-3 shell really well? :) > > Ah, that explains why the shipping charges are so low!!! :-/ > And, why some of them RATTLE when shaken!
Yeah, we had a bad batch of fake 2N2955s. Zhang had a bad week; 12- year-olds can be so moody. We cut his pay by half for a few days; he straightened up and we saved 25 cents US.
> How are you fixed for supplying high quality *tea* leaves?? ;)
We use tea leaves to fill up the extra space in the TO-3 cans! Run one of them at high currents and a fresh tea scent will appear, for your beautiful time. Matt Roberds
Reply by November 20, 20132013-11-20
Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com> wrote:
> So, one manufacturer decided to try color coding, as inspired by Frog > Design of San Francisco. That was Packard Bell.
I remember Packard Bell PCs in the mid-90s with this; I think their colors were different than the "modern" standard. Later on, Intel and Microsoft standardized the color coding with the PC 97 and PC 99 standards, which match what you see today. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PC_System_Design_Guide Matt Roberds
Reply by Don Y November 19, 20132013-11-19
On 11/17/2013 11:53 AM, miso wrote:
> On 11/15/2013 12:37 PM, Don Y wrote: >> On 11/15/2013 12:56 AM, miso wrote: >>> On 11/14/2013 11:47 PM, Don Y wrote: >>>> Hi, >>>> >>>> They're everywhere! >>>> >>>> And, often CRAP! >>>> >>>> Any guidelines on selection criteria? Any worries about failure modes? >>>> >>>> Do the "inverse" variety (now popular on laptops, LCD's, etc.) offer >>>> any special advantages over the traditional style? >>>> >>>> Thx, >>>> --don >>> >>> Do you mean coaxial power plugs, or RF connectors with females on both >>> sides? >> >> power plugs. sorry, i thought that would have been obvious from my >> derogatory references! :> >> >>> If you are building custom gear and you meant a DC coaxial connector, >>> use a Cannon XLR connector for power. There are 4 pin connectors if you >>> want to be official. Use a 3 pin if you are the only person using the >>> gear. The 4 pin version is to avoid people not knowing what they are >>> doing plugging in the wrong gear. >>> >>> Four pin XLR is used in ENG, but then it also found its way into some >>> custom audio. >> >> Huh??? like the sort used on microphones? >> >> WAY too big and far heavier than needed. >> >> Thknk of the sorts of places you see "barrel connectors" and imagine >> one of yours in that same application... > > For low volume gear, who cares if the connector is big? Everything > doesn't have to fit into your pocket. I have a 12v breakout box used to > distribute power from a SLA to various devices using 3 pin XLRs. The > alternative is the fucking cigarette lighter. I use as few of the > coaxial power connectors as I can since they just fall out if tugged.
Don't use them in places where they will get tugged! :> From where I'm sitting, I count: - 11 external (USB/eSATA) disk drives, - one Gb switch - two 7 port USB hubs - 1 print server - 2 DVD "video digitizers/recorders" - 2 USB video digitizers - 3 NAS boxes - 2 laptops - 1 tablet PC - 1 rechargeable LED lantern - a rechargeable "portable UPS" (battery w/UPS in a bible-sized box) - 1 million CP rechargeable flashlight Each with such a connector and none complaining that they've been unplugged (though the wall warts may not be connected to primary power -- different problem entirely)! And, I'm in my *bedroom*! (no idea what the office has in these terms)
> The alternative is the mini XLR if you are space constrained. >> http://www.switchcraft.com/Category.aspx?Parent=806
Yes, I have a drawer (~few hundred) of those as well as the larger XLR's (in their "component" form). And a comparable number of circular DIN with various pin counts, etc. They're too big and too "unique". Are you going to be able to purchase a replacement power supply from a third party vendor with that particular connector pinned out a specific way? If you want to be in the spare parts business, I guess that's a possibility... OTOH, if you have better things to do with your time/resources, you may prefer letting someone else supply a stock, COTS part -- but know EXACTLY what characteristics you want to choose to specify that part!
Reply by Don Lancaster November 19, 20132013-11-19
On 11/15/2013 12:56 AM, miso wrote:
> On 11/14/2013 11:47 PM, Don Y wrote: >> Hi, >> >> They're everywhere! >> >> And, often CRAP! >> >> Any guidelines on selection criteria? Any worries about failure modes? >> >> Do the "inverse" variety (now popular on laptops, LCD's, etc.) offer >> any special advantages over the traditional style? >> >> Thx, >> --don > > Do you mean coaxial power plugs, or RF connectors with females on both > sides? > > If you are building custom gear and you meant a DC coaxial connector, > use a Cannon XLR connector for power. There are 4 pin connectors if you > want to be official. Use a 3 pin if you are the only person using the > gear. The 4 pin version is to avoid people not knowing what they are > doing plugging in the wrong gear. > > Four pin XLR is used in ENG, but then it also found its way into some > custom audio. >
We have bunches of these in stock cheap on eBay. Amphenol rather than Canon, in original die cast metal. http://www.ebay.com/sch/m.html?_odkw=&_ipg=25&_osacat=0&_armrs=1&_ssn=abeja&_trksid=p2046732.m570.l1313.TR12.TRC2.A0.Xxlr&_nkw=xlr&_sacat=0&_from=R40 -- Many thanks, Don Lancaster voice phone: (928)428-4073 Synergetics 3860 West First Street Box 809 Thatcher, AZ 85552 rss: http://www.tinaja.com/whtnu.xml email: don@tinaja.com Please visit my GURU's LAIR web site at http://www.tinaja.com
Reply by David Eather November 19, 20132013-11-19
On Mon, 18 Nov 2013 10:38:31 +1000, Phil Allison <phil_a@tpg.com.au> wrote:

> > "David Eather" > > > ** Fuck off you stinking criminal net stalker !! > > > > > >
Phil, A serious question to you. Have you ever done anything that justifies your overinflated self image? Be specific...
Reply by David Eather November 19, 20132013-11-19
On Wed, 20 Nov 2013 06:03:14 +1000, amdx <nojunk@knology.net> wrote:

> On 11/17/2013 12:59 PM, miso wrote: >> We've been through this before. Tourettes is only with spoken word. >> >> A friends wife is a nurse and had to deal with someone as psychotic as >> the bad Phil. Besides cursing profusely, he would also shout "give me a >> blow job". > > Is that a successful technique? :-)
Do you really want a blow job from Phil?
Reply by amdx November 19, 20132013-11-19
On 11/17/2013 12:59 PM, miso wrote:
> We've been through this before. Tourettes is only with spoken word. > > A friends wife is a nurse and had to deal with someone as psychotic as > the bad Phil. Besides cursing profusely, he would also shout "give me a > blow job".
Is that a successful technique? :-)
Reply by David Eather November 19, 20132013-11-19
On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 17:23:05 +1000, josephkk  
<joseph_barrett@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

> On Mon, 18 Nov 2013 10:01:00 +1000, "David Eather" <eather@tpg.com.au> > wrote: > >> On Mon, 18 Nov 2013 04:59:27 +1000, miso <miso@sushi.com> wrote: >> >>> We've been through this before. Tourettes is only with spoken word. >>> >>> A friends wife is a nurse and had to deal with someone as psychotic as >>> the bad Phil. Besides cursing profusely, he would also shout "give me a >>> blow job". >> >> Also Tourettes is involuntary, It will come out where it doesn't make >> grammatical sense. Phil is pretty good at grammar - so tourettes isn't >> it. > > Would you give that a recheck. The correlation is imperfect. Plus many > of the related syndromes include a bit of the out of place profanity. > Perhaps study a bit of the more recent findings before so confidently > making assertions. Just a suggestion. > > ?-)
There would be times it would come out in the perfect place, but not enough to fool anyone for any length of time.
Reply by Don Y November 19, 20132013-11-19
Hi Jeff,

On 11/19/2013 12:10 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Mon, 18 Nov 2013 15:33:33 -0700, Don Y <This.is@not.Me> wrote: > >> IMO, better solution is to make it so things won't *fit* in >> the wrong places! :> > > Right. That usually degenerates into using identical keyed > connectors.
It's worked (reasonably) for USB. Also, you don't need a key if you can ensure none of the "right" signals will ever come into contact with the "wrong" device. E.g., a multiconductor audio connector wherein "mic" is on a particular pin, "line in" on two others and "line out on still others. Plug in a device that uses all of the above and its one connection. Plug in separate devices, then separate but compatible connections. (silly example; but look at DVI connectors and the range of options they support)
> The problem with those is that there's always someone > willing to apply brute force to override the keying.
Can't protect from idiots. I know a guy who plugged a (4p) power connector into a disk drive "backwards" (I didn't think that would be possible with *any* amount of effort!) "Didn't you feel it not fitting?" <shrug> "Yeah, I just pushed harder!" "Well, congratulations! You now own a toasted disk!"
> The original XT > power supply to MB connectors were like that. The only thing that > kept them from being inserted in the wrong receptacle was some easily > broken keying plastic. I think I killed about 3 motherboards before > the new ATX connectors arrived, which solve the problem. However, it > didn't last, when manufacturers went from 20 pin to 24 pin, using the > same connector and adding another with 4 pins. Now, there was plenty > of opportunity to improperly insert the 20 pin plug in a 24 pin socket > and blowing something up. Yeah, I really like keyed connectors. > >> Don't know about you but, other than >> my laptops, I can't *see* anything on the backs of the machines >> once they are "in place" (under desk, etc). > > That's much like all display advertisements for desktop and laptops. > There are absolutely no cords anywhere in sight. I recall one ad > showing a desktop on the kitchen table, with the requisite smiling > gorgeous blond computing merrily, but with no cables or power plugged > into the easily visible back of the computer. It's almost like > cables, cords, and wires are a necessary evil, not to be shown to > prospective buyers for fear of causing immediate panic or distress.
I think they *do* intimidate many people. Show them a bunch of wires and they imagine "but how do I know where they'll all go?"
> Ok, I'll confess. I'm a slob and have wires everywhere. The mouse > and keyboard go into the back of the desktop. Same with the USB > camera and several USB hard disk drives. I have 4 USB jacks in the > front of my Dell Optiplex 960. Three are filled with cell phone and > smartphone cables, used to sync, replicate, clone, or download data > from the various phones and devices. Most everything else is either > wireless or connected via ethernet.
I leave the front connectors (audio, FW, USB) "free" for transient things. A thumb drive that I want to plug *just once*, etc. The first thing that I do when setting up a new machine is glue a small 4 port powered USB hub onto the back, somewhere (double-sticky 3M "foam"). Then, put all the low speed devices into that: mouse, keyboard, etc. Leaves the rest of the machine's USB ports ('cept for the one I just used) clear for other devices. If I need a separate "channel" for a particular high speed device (video digitizer), I add a 4/5 port card. My solution to the "two many USB devices" issue is to split peripherals among different workstations. E.g., scanner and color inkjet don't need to be attached to machine that I use for CAD -- which needs a tablet, etc.
>> And, manufacturers don't want to clutter up the front, ACCESSIBLE >> side of the machine with all those connectors (where they would >> be easy to access but a cosmetic eyesore). > > All the connectors can be hidden behind doors. The current desktops > by Dell, HP, and Acer have doors to access the connectors. Several of > my customers have removed the doors because they get in the way. > Again, it's like cables and connectors are a customer repellent.
My front connectors hide behind a flimsy door. I keep it closed lest it snap off! (cuz the connectors aren't used, normally)
>> So, the rationalization is that "you only do this once" so it >> can be tedious. > > Huh? I'm moving cables and connectors around all the time.
Exactly! Just because they *think* (hope) that's the case (which is how they rationalized putting stuff "out of the way" on the back) doesn't make it so.
>> Is your keyboard mouse plugged into the front USB connectors >> on your machine? Or, the rear? > > Rear. > >> When you have to unplug either >> of them (to relocate or untangle), how easy is it to reinsert the >> plugs? Which side is "up"? Can you "feel" where it should go? > > I cheat and use a inspection mirror. Even so, it's a pain to get it > right. Therefore, most of my machines are setup so that I can slide > them forward, lean over the top, and deal with the connector tangle. I > also have photos of the backs of my machines, so I can re-insert the > USB plugs in the same holes. Some drivers don't like it when the USB > port moves.
Mine are under my work tables -- which are pushed up against the wall (just enough room for cables to sneak up between wall and table). So, to see behind (with mirror) I have to crawl under table just to get a mirror in position (or, use binoculars to view a mirror on a telescopic arm -- I can't read small print at 3 ft in a dimly lit area!) Sliding the machines forward means all the cabling is at risk. Video cables to two monitors, all the USB connections, SCSI cables, audio cables, network cable, etc. I.e., I *really* don't like having to crawl around behind machines UNDER a table just to make sure the DB9 is "correct side up". Or, that the USB plug is actually lined up with its mate and not just "upside down".
>> In the PS2 days, could you see the color surrounding each of the two >> *adjacent* keyboard/mouse connectors? > > Only in the late part of the PS/2 era. In the beginning, everything > was either black or beige. > >> <grin> > > <groan> > >> Like most PC things, they just "happened" -- without much >> forethought. > > There's a long story here, but I'll save it for another time. There > was some planning, but in the dot com era, almost anything that looked > like a computer was funded and occasionally delivered. Some of these > even sold well. > >> You can choose colors that minimize the most common forms of >> color blindness. > > True, but there's more. Every color has its meaning and effect on the > user. For example, red is suppose to be some form on alarm. Green > means go. Yellow means stop and think about it. See your > neighborhood traffic signal, or industrial designer, for details. The > problem is that these three only apply to the USA. For example, in > China, red means good luck. Trying to find a common ground for color > coding is not a trivial exercise if you plan to ship world wide. For > example, while monitors in the USA came in beige, gray and black, > those sold in Europe came in all kinds of garish colors. These are a > bit over the top, but might give you a clue as the thinking: > <http://www.empower-yourself-with-color-psychology.com/meaning-of-colors.html> > <http://www.designbyjoyce.com/color_meanings.html>
You can use *shapes*. E.g., 'O' [sic] and '1'. Or, a consistent "pull on, push off". Where the information channel is available to all instead of a select group with a particular skill/sense set.
>> Just like you can choose "product keys" >> that use all capital letters (no '1' vs 'l' confusion) and >> avoid '0' vs. 'O' vs 'Q', '8' vs. 'B', '1' vs 'I', etc. >> >> *If* you think about it before *doing* it! :> > > Product colors are the domain of the industrial designer, who has a > very different criteria for selecting colors. > > As for accommodating the needs of the visually impaired, various > federal laws require that access to computing facilities and devices > accommodate such handicaps. However, I don't believe that color > blindness is considered a handicap by any of these laws. I dug into > the ADA web pile, but didn't find anything specific for color > blindness. Since it's not requirement, I suspect color blindness can > be ignored. > <http://www.ada.gov>
It's not ignored in safety critical applications.
> All I could find is a settlement agreement with Wells Fargo bank > agreed to fix the fonts on their web pile so that a color blind user > could set the colors on their computer to improve visibility.
Look at the effort the gummit is going through in order to make currency more "accessible" to the visually impaired. Look at the colossal screw ups it's made in the past re: the *unimpaired* (Susan B Anthony, anybody? :> )