Reply by T November 23, 20132013-11-23
In article <krOdnVThKK8y2hDPnZ2dnUVZ_j-dnZ2d@giganews.com>, 
jmelson@wustl.edu says...
> > >> Oh, another one I want to try is to make an acoustic delay line: but I > >> want > >> to run it at audio frequency and use the air as the delay line.. > >> (instead > >> of wire or crystal), so that you can listen to it.. > Years ago some friends of mine and I used to sit around trying to > think up the craziest things that could actually work (at least in > some fashion). One of them was a computer networking technology > that would ship serial ASCII data around on garden hoses, using > ultrasonic transducers as receive and transmit elements. Never got > around to it, but it had a fair chance of working -- I think. > > Jon
Hey, I've actually seen mercury delay lines used for registers on older computers like the PB-250. And then being the Bell System history buff tha I am I love that they used barrier grid, flying spot, and other way esoteric memory systems on the first fully electronic switching system. That gradually morphed to core and twistor but that's another time.
Reply by Jon Elson November 20, 20132013-11-20


>> Oh, another one I want to try is to make an acoustic delay line: but I >> want >> to run it at audio frequency and use the air as the delay line.. >> (instead >> of wire or crystal), so that you can listen to it..
Years ago some friends of mine and I used to sit around trying to think up the craziest things that could actually work (at least in some fashion). One of them was a computer networking technology that would ship serial ASCII data around on garden hoses, using ultrasonic transducers as receive and transmit elements. Never got around to it, but it had a fair chance of working -- I think. Jon
Reply by November 19, 20132013-11-19
On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 03:55:03 -0800 (PST), Greegor
<greegor47@gmail.com> wrote:

>One description said it was like a rotating >disk memory except the platter stayed still >while the information rotated around it. >It didn't have to be round at all. >Sounds a bit like a magnetic core memory.
Not at all. The magnetic domains actually moved (more like charge movement in a DRAM - or better example, a CCD).
> >http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/How_bubble_memory_works > >That they called it "Bubble" memory at all >was misleading, conjuring a technology >where fluid bubbles acted like EEPROMs. >
Not misleading at all. The bubbles were magnetic domains and were easily seen bumping around like bubbles on the top of a fish tank (in polarized light - sorta like an LCD).
>Sequential access like core or a hard disk >with only one track flying around.
Multi-track was also done. It was a dumber idea, though, because it was way too slow to begin with. Making half as slow didn't solve anything.
>I only brought it up because >of the "crazy memory ideas?" OP.
It was way too expensive to survive. I worked on it and it was fun but I knew it was going to be a short project. It was a crazy idea. Even crazier was logic done with bubbles. It was good for a pile of patents, though. It did survive, for a while, in space applications. The technology is quite rad-hard.
Reply by Greegor November 19, 20132013-11-19
One description said it was like a rotating
disk memory except the platter stayed still
while the information rotated around it.
It didn't have to be round at all.
Sounds a bit like a magnetic core memory.
 
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/How_bubble_memory_works
 
That they called it "Bubble" memory at all
was misleading, conjuring a technology
where fluid bubbles acted like EEPROMs.
 
Sequential access like core or a hard disk
with only one track flying around.
 
I only brought it up because
of the "crazy memory ideas?" OP.
 
Reply by November 18, 20132013-11-18
On Mon, 18 Nov 2013 05:37:49 -0800 (PST), Greegor
<greegor47@gmail.com> wrote:

>Remember when bubble memory was in use?
>How did that technology fare as it aged? > >Is bubble memory still made for some reason?
Reply by November 18, 20132013-11-18
On Mon, 18 Nov 2013 05:37:49 -0800 (PST), Greegor
<greegor47@gmail.com> wrote:

>Remember when bubble memory was in use?
Sure. I worked on some boards using bubble memories.
>How did that technology fare as it aged?
It didn't age at all. It died an early death - stillborn in fact. May it stay dead.
>Is bubble memory still made for some reason?
No, it is not made, for many reasons. Diskettes (remember those?) killed it. And then were in turn killed by USB.
Reply by Phil Hobbs November 18, 20132013-11-18
On 11/18/2013 8:37 AM, Greegor wrote:
> Remember when bubble memory was in use? > How did that technology fare as it aged? >
It went away because it was too slow, too weird, had serial access, and didn't scale well to smaller geometries. Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 USA +1 845 480 2058 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net
Reply by Greegor November 18, 20132013-11-18
Remember when bubble memory was in use?
How did that technology fare as it aged?
 
Is bubble memory still made for some reason?
Reply by Jim Thompson November 17, 20132013-11-17
On Sat, 16 Nov 2013 09:59:30 -0500, krw@attt.bizz wrote:

>On Fri, 15 Nov 2013 17:25:13 -0500, Martin Riddle ><martin_rid@verizon.net> wrote: > >>On Wed, 13 Nov 2013 10:36:07 -0700, Jim Thompson >><To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >> >>>On Wed, 13 Nov 2013 08:51:09 -0800, Charlie E. <edmondson@ieee.org> >>>wrote: >>> >>>>On Wed, 13 Nov 2013 09:11:14 -0700, Jim Thompson >>>><To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >>>> >>>>>On Wed, 13 Nov 2013 07:43:32 -0700, RobertMacy >>>>><robert.a.macy@gmail.com> wrote: >>>>> >>>>>>On Tue, 12 Nov 2013 20:58:29 -0700, Greegor <greegor47@gmail.com> wrote: >>>>>> >>>>>>> On Tuesday, November 12, 2013 7:24:35 PM UTC-6, John Larkin wrote: >>>>>>>> I've noticed a tendency for old people to want to retire to very hot >>>>>>>> places, like Tampa, Florida or Bullhead City, Arizona. That's an >>>>>>>> over-reaction to a little snow. >>>>>>> I don't think it's just snow. >>>>>>> Lots of older folks move from the North >>>>>>> to AZ because cold and humidity sets >>>>>>> off rheumatism/joint pain. >>>>>>> Arizona has lower pollen counts too, right? >>>>>>> Sometimes we get pollen blooms so thick >>>>>>> that even people not known for allergies >>>>>>> start having allergic wheezing and runny >>>>>>> noses. (Iowa) >>>>>> >>>>>>Houses are built better than in California. Seriously: travertine floors, >>>>>>10 to 12 foot ceiling heights, granite counters. Floor to ceiling glass >>>>>>looking out onto beautiful country. Temperature inside home is easy to >>>>>>maintain between 82 to 88 all year round. >>>>>> >>>>>>And with tongue in cheek... As people age, they 'see the light' and become >>>>>>Republicans, so move to a gun-toting Republican state that's nearby. >>>>> >>>>>I moved to Arizona when I was 22 years old ;-) >>>>> >>>>>(Actually I interviewed Motorola in February of 1962, returned to >>>>>Cambridge to find my car frozen to the ground... that's why I selected >>>>>Motorola's offer versus those from Dallas, Houston, Philadelphia and >>>>>El Segundo. Then I _drove_ into Arizona in June, without A/C... and >>>>>first thought I had made a horrible mistake... downtown Scottsdale was >>>>>at 124&#2013266096;F :-) >>>>> >>>>> ...Jim Thompson >>>> >>>>We have plenty of them here in the Coachella Valley, so his original >>>>hypothesis is supported in that. It gets plenty warm here, so much so >>>>that many of those retirees (we call them snowbirds!) leave from June >>>>till October and go back 'home' for the summer! >>> >>>Coachella Valley has been in the news recently >:-} >>> >>>Snowbirds do have a value... our house sold so fast we had to find >>>temporary lodging while the new house was being built. We ended up >>>staying at an Ohio snowbird's winter lodging for 5 months... for free! >>> >>> ...Jim Thompson >> >>So I assume you avoided the 1% tax of 3.8% for income over $250k. ( >>which includes capital gains from a house sale ;) > >What is "1% tax of 3.8%"? There is still a $500K exemption for >capital gains from home sales. Expect the Democrats to come after >that next. My house doesn't close until next year but I'm also taking >a $30K loss, which is not deductible. Gains count. Losses, not so >much. >
Yep. The exemption. I don't know of the "1% tax of 3.8%"... whaazit? ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
Reply by November 16, 20132013-11-16
On Fri, 15 Nov 2013 12:56:40 -0800 (PST), Greegor
<greegor47@gmail.com> wrote:

>krw > Probably a leftover of the Civil War and >krw > Reconstruction. The South more or less >krw > missed the entire "progressive" movement. > >Perhaps when Lincoln massively enlarged >the Federal government the South didn't >get as much of a share?
They got a "share". It was called "Reconstruction" (AKA bend over).
>JT > Southern states tend to be more >JT > "hands-on", around the throats of >JT > politicians >:-} > >Is it possible that Southerners >still somehow remember how the >Federal government turned on them?
They remember, alright.
>There really was NOT any law against >states seceding from the Union. >As far as I have ever seen, joining >the Union never legally removed any >right for a state to secede.
It's the government. You want them to follow the rules?
>Lincoln enlarged the Federal government >in a way that the founders would >have seen as treason. Our system was >supposed to have a weak central government. >Lincoln turned it into an Iron Fist.
That was only the beginning.
>Did this make Southerners more aware >that government itself can become the >biggest enemy of the people?
It's not just the deep South, though. I think it's more of the South's roots are agricultural rather then industrial; more individual rather than collective.
>JT > Northerners are blas&#2013265929;, vote for >JT > the guy who talks nice... but >JT > they are otherwise ignorant as a >JT > rock... sort of like Slowman >:-} > >Growing up in family small businesses >in Minnesota, I certainly developed >a strong disdain for bureaucracy and >the "charmers" like Humphrey.
Minnesota always surprised me, though it's like most states with a large, dominate, city. Cities are more collective. If that isn't offset, it becomes an infinite money sink as people vote themselves money, to be taken from others.