Reply by August 28, 20132013-08-28
On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 07:01:27 -0700, John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote:

>On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote: > >>On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz <krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >>> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >>><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>> >>>> >>>> >>>>http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >>> >>> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >>> >>> Global warming, you know. >> >>perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off? > >I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree >rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to >1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish >burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and >redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off.
Some species even require forest fires every year or at least every few years to survive.
>Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. >The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate >change.
Building houses in the forest that previously had forest fires at least once or twice a decade is asking for trouble. Building houses on a floodplain and then people complain about being flooded at least once a decade. Cutting down the forests in the mountains and then complain about floods downstream... It is nice if you can blame "climate change" instead of your own stupidity :-)
Reply by Jim Thompson August 27, 20132013-08-27
On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 14:27:16 -0700, John Larkin
<jlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote:

>On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 11:59:04 -0800, Robert Baer ><robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: > >>John Larkin wrote: >>> On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 08:20:27 -0700, Jim Thompson >>> <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >>> >>>> On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 07:01:27 -0700, John Larkin >>>> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>>> >>>>> On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts<jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote: >>>>> >>>>>> On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz<krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >>>>>>> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >>>>>>> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>>>>>> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >>>>>>> >>>>>>> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >>>>>>> >>>>>>> Global warming, you know. >>>>>> >>>>>> perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off? >>>>> >>>>> I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree >>>>> rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to >>>>> 1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish >>>>> burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and >>>>> redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off. >>>>> >>>>> Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. >>>>> The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate >>>>> change. >>>>> >>>>> >>>> >>>> Yep. Back when "clear-cutting" was the norm in the lumber business, >>>> we had very few major fires. Then the greenies came along. I always >>>> find it delightful when it's their house that burns down>:-} >>>> >>>> ...Jim Thompson >>> >>> Of course. You always delight in the misfortune of others. You are a mean, nasty >>> old git. >>> >>> >> Methinks you missed his point (by a mile). > >His point is that he'd be delighted by someone's house burning down. I >suppose their children dying in the fire would be an extra bonus for >him.
You're mentally ill, go seek help. ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
Reply by John Larkin August 27, 20132013-08-27
On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 11:59:04 -0800, Robert Baer
<robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote:

>John Larkin wrote: >> On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 08:20:27 -0700, Jim Thompson >> <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >> >>> On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 07:01:27 -0700, John Larkin >>> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>> >>>> On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts<jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote: >>>> >>>>> On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz<krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >>>>>> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >>>>>> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>>>>> >>>>>>> >>>>>>> >>>>>>> http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >>>>>> >>>>>> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >>>>>> >>>>>> Global warming, you know. >>>>> >>>>> perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off? >>>> >>>> I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree >>>> rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to >>>> 1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish >>>> burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and >>>> redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off. >>>> >>>> Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. >>>> The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate >>>> change. >>>> >>>> >>> >>> Yep. Back when "clear-cutting" was the norm in the lumber business, >>> we had very few major fires. Then the greenies came along. I always >>> find it delightful when it's their house that burns down>:-} >>> >>> ...Jim Thompson >> >> Of course. You always delight in the misfortune of others. You are a mean, nasty >> old git. >> >> > Methinks you missed his point (by a mile).
His point is that he'd be delighted by someone's house burning down. I suppose their children dying in the fire would be an extra bonus for him. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com http://www.highlandtechnology.com Precision electronic instrumentation Picosecond-resolution Digital Delay and Pulse generators Custom laser drivers and controllers Photonics and fiberoptic TTL data links VME thermocouple, LVDT, synchro acquisition and simulation
Reply by Jim Thompson August 27, 20132013-08-27
On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 11:59:04 -0800, Robert Baer
<robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote:

>John Larkin wrote: >> On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 08:20:27 -0700, Jim Thompson >> <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >> >>> On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 07:01:27 -0700, John Larkin >>> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>> >>>> On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts<jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote: >>>> >>>>> On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz<krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >>>>>> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >>>>>> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>>>>> >>>>>>> >>>>>>> >>>>>>> http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >>>>>> >>>>>> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >>>>>> >>>>>> Global warming, you know. >>>>> >>>>> perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off? >>>> >>>> I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree >>>> rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to >>>> 1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish >>>> burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and >>>> redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off. >>>> >>>> Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. >>>> The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate >>>> change. >>>> >>>> >>> >>> Yep. Back when "clear-cutting" was the norm in the lumber business, >>> we had very few major fires. Then the greenies came along. I always >>> find it delightful when it's their house that burns down>:-} >>> >>> ...Jim Thompson >> >> Of course. You always delight in the misfortune of others. You are a mean, nasty >> old git. >> >> > Methinks you missed his point (by a mile).
It was intentional. Larkin _is_actually_ the mean, nasty, senile old git here. ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
Reply by Robert Baer August 27, 20132013-08-27
John Larkin wrote:
> On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts<jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote: > >> On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz<krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >>> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >>> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>> >>>> >>>> >>>> http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >>> >>> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >>> >>> Global warming, you know. >> >> perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off? > > I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree > rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to > 1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish > burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and > redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off. > > Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. > The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate > change. > >
The thing about that, was that fact was KNOWN at least 20 years ago.. The ads using Smokey the Bear were stopped due to the knowledge,i think.
Reply by Robert Baer August 27, 20132013-08-27
John Larkin wrote:
> On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 08:20:27 -0700, Jim Thompson > <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: > >> On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 07:01:27 -0700, John Larkin >> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >> >>> On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts<jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote: >>> >>>> On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz<krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >>>>> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >>>>> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >>>>> >>>>> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >>>>> >>>>> Global warming, you know. >>>> >>>> perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off? >>> >>> I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree >>> rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to >>> 1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish >>> burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and >>> redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off. >>> >>> Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. >>> The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate >>> change. >>> >>> >> >> Yep. Back when "clear-cutting" was the norm in the lumber business, >> we had very few major fires. Then the greenies came along. I always >> find it delightful when it's their house that burns down>:-} >> >> ...Jim Thompson > > Of course. You always delight in the misfortune of others. You are a mean, nasty > old git. > >
Methinks you missed his point (by a mile).
Reply by Jim Thompson August 27, 20132013-08-27
On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 08:29:28 -0700, John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote:

>On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 08:20:27 -0700, Jim Thompson ><To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: > >>On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 07:01:27 -0700, John Larkin >><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >> >>>On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote: >>> >>>>On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz <krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >>>>> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >>>>><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>>http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >>>>> >>>>> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >>>>> >>>>> Global warming, you know. >>>> >>>>perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off? >>> >>>I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree >>>rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to >>>1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish >>>burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and >>>redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off. >>> >>>Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. >>>The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate >>>change. >>> >>> >> >>Yep. Back when "clear-cutting" was the norm in the lumber business, >>we had very few major fires. Then the greenies came along. I always >>find it delightful when it's their house that burns down >:-} >> >> ...Jim Thompson > >Of course. You always delight in the misfortune of others. You are a mean, nasty >old git.
Schadenfreude is best enjoyed when the victim is the initiator of the problem. (Darwin-award-style :-) As for you, if you don't knock off the nonsense, I'm going to beat the crap out of you with my cane >:-} ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
Reply by John Larkin August 27, 20132013-08-27
On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 08:20:27 -0700, Jim Thompson
<To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote:

>On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 07:01:27 -0700, John Larkin ><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: > >>On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote: >> >>>On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz <krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >>>> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >>>><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>>http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >>>> >>>> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >>>> >>>> Global warming, you know. >>> >>>perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off? >> >>I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree >>rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to >>1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish >>burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and >>redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off. >> >>Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. >>The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate >>change. >> >> > >Yep. Back when "clear-cutting" was the norm in the lumber business, >we had very few major fires. Then the greenies came along. I always >find it delightful when it's their house that burns down >:-} > > ...Jim Thompson
Of course. You always delight in the misfortune of others. You are a mean, nasty old git. -- John Larkin Highland Technology Inc www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com Precision electronic instrumentation Picosecond-resolution Digital Delay and Pulse generators Custom timing and laser controllers Photonics and fiberoptic TTL data links VME analog, thermocouple, LVDT, synchro, tachometer Multichannel arbitrary waveform generators
Reply by Jim Thompson August 27, 20132013-08-27
On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 07:01:27 -0700, John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote:

>On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote: > >>On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz <krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >>> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >>><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >>> >>>> >>>> >>>>http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >>> >>> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >>> >>> Global warming, you know. >> >>perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off? > >I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree >rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to >1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish >burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and >redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off. > >Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. >The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate >change. > >
Yep. Back when "clear-cutting" was the norm in the lumber business, we had very few major fires. Then the greenies came along. I always find it delightful when it's their house that burns down >:-} ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
Reply by John Larkin August 27, 20132013-08-27
On 26 Aug 2013 11:59:35 GMT, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote:

>On 2013-08-25, krw@attt.bizz <krw@attt.bizz> wrote: >> On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:28:02 -0700, John Larkin >><jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >> >>> >>> >>>http://stevengoddard.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/screenhunter_19-may-08-06-04.jpg >> >> http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2013/08/24/slowest-start-to-a-hurricane-season-on-record/ >> >> Global warming, you know. > >perhaps all the tornadoes and wildfires scared them off?
I heard an interview with a sort of paleo-forestry guy. He has studied tree rings and such and concluded that, in the couple of thousand years prior to 1800, about 10% of California forest land burned every year. They were smallish burns, basically brush fires, and the big trees, the pines and oaks and redwoods, survived... prospered, even, as competitors and pests were killed off. Now that we are putting out fires, we get less frequent but much bigger fires. The California forest fire problem is man-made, but it's not about climate change. -- John Larkin Highland Technology Inc www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com Precision electronic instrumentation Picosecond-resolution Digital Delay and Pulse generators Custom timing and laser controllers Photonics and fiberoptic TTL data links VME analog, thermocouple, LVDT, synchro, tachometer Multichannel arbitrary waveform generators