Reply by John Fields March 4, 20132013-03-04
On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 22:37:16 -0000, "Ian Field"
<gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote:


>I've learned to expect advice from you that seems like a cheap deal - but >works out costly in the end!
--- Without at least one example, the expectation is that that's just another of your senseless arguments. -- JF
Reply by Sylvia Else March 2, 20132013-03-02
On 26/02/2013 3:26 PM, SoothSayer wrote:
> On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 07:26:22 -0800, dave <ricketzz@earthlink.net> wrote: > >> >> 13.6 Vdc is the float voltage. > > No shit, dumbfuck. > >> Virtually all amateur radio equipment, >> most mobile communications equipment and power supplies (for above) are >> rated at 13.6 Vdc, > > No shit, dumbfuck. > >> the nominal Voltage of a 6 cell lead acid battery. > > But you very likely have no clue as to why. > >> That is a fact, no matter how rude you become. > > It is also a FACT that a battery at 12 Volts is NOT discharged as you > claimed, DORK.
Discharged is a term of dubious interpretation. However, consider the graphs in this document: http://www.jaycar.com.au/products_uploaded/SB2489.pdf It's clear that if the battery is showing 12V with no load, then you're not going to be able to draw much more charge out of it before its voltage drops to a level where you must stop or risk damage to the battery. Sylvia.
Reply by Ian Field February 28, 20132013-02-28

"John Fields" <jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message 
news:oflvi8tv3272d598ljc3fht5tkk29i2i8q@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 17:23:50 -0000, "Ian Field" > <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: > >> >> >>"mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message >>news:kgm2o9$pn9$1@dont-email.me... >>> On 2/27/2013 12:09 PM, John Fields wrote: >>>> On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 16:17:04 -0000, "Ian Field" >>>> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> "John Fields"<jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >>>>> news:mcbqi8t00ur6s6sk6kmuskjtkpg28fegtm@4ax.com... >>>> >>>>>> My request was about having you describe the dynamics of a >>>>>> light-bulb-in-series-with-a-battery current limiter which, no matter >>>>>> how loudly or how long you squeal excuses about why you can't, you >>>>>> can't, of course. >>>>> >>>>> The bulb trick isn't that great because of its pronounced PTC >>>>> characteristic - as the filament voltage decreases the current doesn't >>>>> decrease in due proportion. >>>> >>>> --- >>>> ??? >>>> >>>> If a you want the current to change linearly with voltage, then a >>>> simple resistor will do the trick so, obviously, you don't understand >>>> how the bulb trick works. >>>> --- >>>> >>>>> I did try to dumb it down for you - I do hope I didn't use too many >>>>> big >>>>> words for you! >>>> >>>> --- >>>> The words are no problem but it seems, for you, the theory _is_. >>>> >>>> Would you like me to explain how the bulb trick works in terms even >>>> you could understand? >>> >>> I understand how the light bulb works, but I'm very interested in >>> hearing YOUR explanation. >>> >> >>When the battery terminal voltage is low and the drop across the filament >>is >>high; the bulb does its best job of current limiting - just when high >>charging current would be no bad thing. As the battery terminal voltage >>approaches or exceeds the required voltage, the inherent PTC >>characteristic >>of the filament means as it cools its resistance falls, its much less >>effective as a current limiter - just when the (possibly overcharging) >>battery needs it most. >> >>The bulb as a current limiter is less than ideal for battery charging - >>but >>better than nothing if you don't have a float capable charger to hand. >> >>I didn't bother to dumb it down for JF - you can draw pictures for him as >>a >>homework excercise. > > --- > You didn't even "bother" to cite an example and the math required to > prove your point.
Its a less than optimum method - I'm hardly likely to go out of my way to encourage its use. With the price of gel batteries, its cheaper in the long run to use a float capable charger - especially as so many discount stores have them at very reasonable prices. I've learned to expect advice from you that seems like a cheap deal - but works out costly in the end!
Reply by John Fields February 28, 20132013-02-28
On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 22:14:10 -0000, "Ian Field"
<gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> > >"John Fields" <jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >news:24kvi8te55i1miuabb18n664slbqsu5srg@4ax.com... >> On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 21:28:02 -0000, "Ian Field" >> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >> >>> >>> >>>"mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message >>>news:kgoao8$g4j$1@dont-email.me... >>>> On 2/28/2013 9:23 AM, Ian Field wrote: >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> "mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message >>>>> news:kgm2o9$pn9$1@dont-email.me... >>>>>> On 2/27/2013 12:09 PM, John Fields wrote: >>>>>>> On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 16:17:04 -0000, "Ian Field" >>>>>>> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >>>>>>> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> "John Fields"<jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >>>>>>>> news:mcbqi8t00ur6s6sk6kmuskjtkpg28fegtm@4ax.com... >>>>>>> >>>>>>>>> My request was about having you describe the dynamics of a >>>>>>>>> light-bulb-in-series-with-a-battery current limiter which, no >>>>>>>>> matter >>>>>>>>> how loudly or how long you squeal excuses about why you can't, you >>>>>>>>> can't, of course. >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> The bulb trick isn't that great because of its pronounced PTC >>>>>>>> characteristic - as the filament voltage decreases the current >>>>>>>> doesn't >>>>>>>> decrease in due proportion. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> --- >>>>>>> ??? >>>>>>> >>>>>>> If a you want the current to change linearly with voltage, then a >>>>>>> simple resistor will do the trick so, obviously, you don't understand >>>>>>> how the bulb trick works. >>>>>>> --- >>>>>>> >>>>>>>> I did try to dumb it down for you - I do hope I didn't use too many >>>>>>>> big >>>>>>>> words for you! >>>>>>> >>>>>>> --- >>>>>>> The words are no problem but it seems, for you, the theory _is_. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> Would you like me to explain how the bulb trick works in terms even >>>>>>> you could understand? >>>>>> >>>>>> I understand how the light bulb works, but I'm very interested in >>>>>> hearing YOUR explanation. >>>>>> >>>>> >>>>> When the battery terminal voltage is low and the drop across the >>>>> filament is high; the bulb does its best job of current limiting - just >>>>> when high charging current would be no bad thing. As the battery >>>>> terminal voltage approaches or exceeds the required voltage, the >>>>> inherent PTC characteristic of the filament means as it cools its >>>>> resistance falls, its much less effective as a current limiter - just >>>>> when the (possibly overcharging) battery needs it most. >>>>> >>>>> The bulb as a current limiter is less than ideal for battery charging - >>>>> but better than nothing if you don't have a float capable charger to >>>>> hand. >>>>> >>>>> I didn't bother to dumb it down for JF - you can draw pictures for him >>>>> as a homework excercise. >>>> >>>> So, you're saying that a light bulb can work very well for current >>>> charging >>>> as long as you pick the voltage and the bulb correctly. >>> >>>No - I didn't make any specific comments about bulb rating at all. >>> >>>> Also, a light bulb can work well to limit the maximum charge current >>>> to stay within the limits of the battery and charger, even in the event >>>> of shorted cells or other faults...as long as you pick the voltage >>>> and bulb correctly. >>> >>>If you'd bothered at all to read what I said - I made it clear that the >>>current curve vs filament temperature is pretty much the opposite of what >>>would be ideal for charging the battery. >>> >>>In the context of the thread so far, typically an unregulated car type >>>charger would be used on a low Ah gel battery - the charger wouldn't need >>>any protection, but as the battery terminal voltage reaches and/or exceeds >>>the full level, the filament voltage is at a minimum, cold filament = low >>>resistance - so not much protection for the battery. >>> >>>I merely conceded that in the absence of a float capable charger, its >>>better >>>than nothing. >>> >>>> >>>> You can do better. You can abuse any charge method. >>>> IMHO, the bang for the buck of a light bulb current limiter is >>>> second to none when properly applied. >>> >>>On reflection - you're probably not the best choice to draw pictures so JF >>>can understand. >> >> --- >> Open mouth, insert foot. > > >I call it as I see it
--- The blind looking for equity? That's your first mistake. -- JF
Reply by John Fields February 28, 20132013-02-28
On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 17:23:50 -0000, "Ian Field"
<gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> > >"mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message >news:kgm2o9$pn9$1@dont-email.me... >> On 2/27/2013 12:09 PM, John Fields wrote: >>> On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 16:17:04 -0000, "Ian Field" >>> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >>> >>>> >>>> >>>> "John Fields"<jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >>>> news:mcbqi8t00ur6s6sk6kmuskjtkpg28fegtm@4ax.com... >>> >>>>> My request was about having you describe the dynamics of a >>>>> light-bulb-in-series-with-a-battery current limiter which, no matter >>>>> how loudly or how long you squeal excuses about why you can't, you >>>>> can't, of course. >>>> >>>> The bulb trick isn't that great because of its pronounced PTC >>>> characteristic - as the filament voltage decreases the current doesn't >>>> decrease in due proportion. >>> >>> --- >>> ??? >>> >>> If a you want the current to change linearly with voltage, then a >>> simple resistor will do the trick so, obviously, you don't understand >>> how the bulb trick works. >>> --- >>> >>>> I did try to dumb it down for you - I do hope I didn't use too many big >>>> words for you! >>> >>> --- >>> The words are no problem but it seems, for you, the theory _is_. >>> >>> Would you like me to explain how the bulb trick works in terms even >>> you could understand? >> >> I understand how the light bulb works, but I'm very interested in >> hearing YOUR explanation. >> > >When the battery terminal voltage is low and the drop across the filament is >high; the bulb does its best job of current limiting - just when high >charging current would be no bad thing. As the battery terminal voltage >approaches or exceeds the required voltage, the inherent PTC characteristic >of the filament means as it cools its resistance falls, its much less >effective as a current limiter - just when the (possibly overcharging) >battery needs it most. > >The bulb as a current limiter is less than ideal for battery charging - but >better than nothing if you don't have a float capable charger to hand. > >I didn't bother to dumb it down for JF - you can draw pictures for him as a >homework excercise.
--- You didn't even "bother" to cite an example and the math required to prove your point. -- JF
Reply by Ian Field February 28, 20132013-02-28

"John Fields" <jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message 
news:24kvi8te55i1miuabb18n664slbqsu5srg@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 21:28:02 -0000, "Ian Field" > <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: > >> >> >>"mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message >>news:kgoao8$g4j$1@dont-email.me... >>> On 2/28/2013 9:23 AM, Ian Field wrote: >>>> >>>> >>>> "mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message >>>> news:kgm2o9$pn9$1@dont-email.me... >>>>> On 2/27/2013 12:09 PM, John Fields wrote: >>>>>> On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 16:17:04 -0000, "Ian Field" >>>>>> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >>>>>> >>>>>>> >>>>>>> >>>>>>> "John Fields"<jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >>>>>>> news:mcbqi8t00ur6s6sk6kmuskjtkpg28fegtm@4ax.com... >>>>>> >>>>>>>> My request was about having you describe the dynamics of a >>>>>>>> light-bulb-in-series-with-a-battery current limiter which, no >>>>>>>> matter >>>>>>>> how loudly or how long you squeal excuses about why you can't, you >>>>>>>> can't, of course. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> The bulb trick isn't that great because of its pronounced PTC >>>>>>> characteristic - as the filament voltage decreases the current >>>>>>> doesn't >>>>>>> decrease in due proportion. >>>>>> >>>>>> --- >>>>>> ??? >>>>>> >>>>>> If a you want the current to change linearly with voltage, then a >>>>>> simple resistor will do the trick so, obviously, you don't understand >>>>>> how the bulb trick works. >>>>>> --- >>>>>> >>>>>>> I did try to dumb it down for you - I do hope I didn't use too many >>>>>>> big >>>>>>> words for you! >>>>>> >>>>>> --- >>>>>> The words are no problem but it seems, for you, the theory _is_. >>>>>> >>>>>> Would you like me to explain how the bulb trick works in terms even >>>>>> you could understand? >>>>> >>>>> I understand how the light bulb works, but I'm very interested in >>>>> hearing YOUR explanation. >>>>> >>>> >>>> When the battery terminal voltage is low and the drop across the >>>> filament is high; the bulb does its best job of current limiting - just >>>> when high charging current would be no bad thing. As the battery >>>> terminal voltage approaches or exceeds the required voltage, the >>>> inherent PTC characteristic of the filament means as it cools its >>>> resistance falls, its much less effective as a current limiter - just >>>> when the (possibly overcharging) battery needs it most. >>>> >>>> The bulb as a current limiter is less than ideal for battery charging - >>>> but better than nothing if you don't have a float capable charger to >>>> hand. >>>> >>>> I didn't bother to dumb it down for JF - you can draw pictures for him >>>> as a homework excercise. >>> >>> So, you're saying that a light bulb can work very well for current >>> charging >>> as long as you pick the voltage and the bulb correctly. >> >>No - I didn't make any specific comments about bulb rating at all. >> >>> Also, a light bulb can work well to limit the maximum charge current >>> to stay within the limits of the battery and charger, even in the event >>> of shorted cells or other faults...as long as you pick the voltage >>> and bulb correctly. >> >>If you'd bothered at all to read what I said - I made it clear that the >>current curve vs filament temperature is pretty much the opposite of what >>would be ideal for charging the battery. >> >>In the context of the thread so far, typically an unregulated car type >>charger would be used on a low Ah gel battery - the charger wouldn't need >>any protection, but as the battery terminal voltage reaches and/or exceeds >>the full level, the filament voltage is at a minimum, cold filament = low >>resistance - so not much protection for the battery. >> >>I merely conceded that in the absence of a float capable charger, its >>better >>than nothing. >> >>> >>> You can do better. You can abuse any charge method. >>> IMHO, the bang for the buck of a light bulb current limiter is >>> second to none when properly applied. >> >>On reflection - you're probably not the best choice to draw pictures so JF >>can understand. > > --- > Open mouth, insert foot.
I call it as I see it - which any way you look at it, is better than the senseless twaddle you spout.
Reply by John Fields February 28, 20132013-02-28
On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 21:28:02 -0000, "Ian Field"
<gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> > >"mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message >news:kgoao8$g4j$1@dont-email.me... >> On 2/28/2013 9:23 AM, Ian Field wrote: >>> >>> >>> "mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message >>> news:kgm2o9$pn9$1@dont-email.me... >>>> On 2/27/2013 12:09 PM, John Fields wrote: >>>>> On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 16:17:04 -0000, "Ian Field" >>>>> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> "John Fields"<jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >>>>>> news:mcbqi8t00ur6s6sk6kmuskjtkpg28fegtm@4ax.com... >>>>> >>>>>>> My request was about having you describe the dynamics of a >>>>>>> light-bulb-in-series-with-a-battery current limiter which, no matter >>>>>>> how loudly or how long you squeal excuses about why you can't, you >>>>>>> can't, of course. >>>>>> >>>>>> The bulb trick isn't that great because of its pronounced PTC >>>>>> characteristic - as the filament voltage decreases the current doesn't >>>>>> decrease in due proportion. >>>>> >>>>> --- >>>>> ??? >>>>> >>>>> If a you want the current to change linearly with voltage, then a >>>>> simple resistor will do the trick so, obviously, you don't understand >>>>> how the bulb trick works. >>>>> --- >>>>> >>>>>> I did try to dumb it down for you - I do hope I didn't use too many >>>>>> big >>>>>> words for you! >>>>> >>>>> --- >>>>> The words are no problem but it seems, for you, the theory _is_. >>>>> >>>>> Would you like me to explain how the bulb trick works in terms even >>>>> you could understand? >>>> >>>> I understand how the light bulb works, but I'm very interested in >>>> hearing YOUR explanation. >>>> >>> >>> When the battery terminal voltage is low and the drop across the >>> filament is high; the bulb does its best job of current limiting - just >>> when high charging current would be no bad thing. As the battery >>> terminal voltage approaches or exceeds the required voltage, the >>> inherent PTC characteristic of the filament means as it cools its >>> resistance falls, its much less effective as a current limiter - just >>> when the (possibly overcharging) battery needs it most. >>> >>> The bulb as a current limiter is less than ideal for battery charging - >>> but better than nothing if you don't have a float capable charger to >>> hand. >>> >>> I didn't bother to dumb it down for JF - you can draw pictures for him >>> as a homework excercise. >> >> So, you're saying that a light bulb can work very well for current >> charging >> as long as you pick the voltage and the bulb correctly. > >No - I didn't make any specific comments about bulb rating at all. > >> Also, a light bulb can work well to limit the maximum charge current >> to stay within the limits of the battery and charger, even in the event >> of shorted cells or other faults...as long as you pick the voltage >> and bulb correctly. > >If you'd bothered at all to read what I said - I made it clear that the >current curve vs filament temperature is pretty much the opposite of what >would be ideal for charging the battery. > >In the context of the thread so far, typically an unregulated car type >charger would be used on a low Ah gel battery - the charger wouldn't need >any protection, but as the battery terminal voltage reaches and/or exceeds >the full level, the filament voltage is at a minimum, cold filament = low >resistance - so not much protection for the battery. > >I merely conceded that in the absence of a float capable charger, its better >than nothing. > >> >> You can do better. You can abuse any charge method. >> IMHO, the bang for the buck of a light bulb current limiter is >> second to none when properly applied. > >On reflection - you're probably not the best choice to draw pictures so JF >can understand.
--- Open mouth, insert foot. I think you've just alienated a well meaning and knowledgeable potential ally... -- JF
Reply by Ian Field February 28, 20132013-02-28

"mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message 
news:kgoao8$g4j$1@dont-email.me...
> On 2/28/2013 9:23 AM, Ian Field wrote: >> >> >> "mike" <ham789@netzero.net> wrote in message >> news:kgm2o9$pn9$1@dont-email.me... >>> On 2/27/2013 12:09 PM, John Fields wrote: >>>> On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 16:17:04 -0000, "Ian Field" >>>> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> "John Fields"<jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >>>>> news:mcbqi8t00ur6s6sk6kmuskjtkpg28fegtm@4ax.com... >>>> >>>>>> My request was about having you describe the dynamics of a >>>>>> light-bulb-in-series-with-a-battery current limiter which, no matter >>>>>> how loudly or how long you squeal excuses about why you can't, you >>>>>> can't, of course. >>>>> >>>>> The bulb trick isn't that great because of its pronounced PTC >>>>> characteristic - as the filament voltage decreases the current doesn't >>>>> decrease in due proportion. >>>> >>>> --- >>>> ??? >>>> >>>> If a you want the current to change linearly with voltage, then a >>>> simple resistor will do the trick so, obviously, you don't understand >>>> how the bulb trick works. >>>> --- >>>> >>>>> I did try to dumb it down for you - I do hope I didn't use too many >>>>> big >>>>> words for you! >>>> >>>> --- >>>> The words are no problem but it seems, for you, the theory _is_. >>>> >>>> Would you like me to explain how the bulb trick works in terms even >>>> you could understand? >>> >>> I understand how the light bulb works, but I'm very interested in >>> hearing YOUR explanation. >>> >> >> When the battery terminal voltage is low and the drop across the >> filament is high; the bulb does its best job of current limiting - just >> when high charging current would be no bad thing. As the battery >> terminal voltage approaches or exceeds the required voltage, the >> inherent PTC characteristic of the filament means as it cools its >> resistance falls, its much less effective as a current limiter - just >> when the (possibly overcharging) battery needs it most. >> >> The bulb as a current limiter is less than ideal for battery charging - >> but better than nothing if you don't have a float capable charger to >> hand. >> >> I didn't bother to dumb it down for JF - you can draw pictures for him >> as a homework excercise. > > So, you're saying that a light bulb can work very well for current > charging > as long as you pick the voltage and the bulb correctly.
No - I didn't make any specific comments about bulb rating at all.
> Also, a light bulb can work well to limit the maximum charge current > to stay within the limits of the battery and charger, even in the event > of shorted cells or other faults...as long as you pick the voltage > and bulb correctly.
If you'd bothered at all to read what I said - I made it clear that the current curve vs filament temperature is pretty much the opposite of what would be ideal for charging the battery. In the context of the thread so far, typically an unregulated car type charger would be used on a low Ah gel battery - the charger wouldn't need any protection, but as the battery terminal voltage reaches and/or exceeds the full level, the filament voltage is at a minimum, cold filament = low resistance - so not much protection for the battery. I merely conceded that in the absence of a float capable charger, its better than nothing.
> > You can do better. You can abuse any charge method. > IMHO, the bang for the buck of a light bulb current limiter is > second to none when properly applied.
On reflection - you're probably not the best choice to draw pictures so JF can understand.
Reply by John Fields February 28, 20132013-02-28
On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 17:09:46 -0000, "Ian Field"
<gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> > >"John Fields" <jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >news:da3ti8t3271hgl1tumgdhk9nh46mjrfc32@4ax.com... >> On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 21:54:29 -0000, "Ian Field" >> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >> >>> >>> >>>"John Fields" <jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >>>news:20qsi85cd3m4f18uhs253s4tilbeu28gs9@4ax.com... >> >>>> Posted the same thing twice, huh? >>> >>> >>>Actually I was wondering if WLM is yet another flaky POS designed by you - >>>it sometimes jams up in the outbox, then sends it twice next time the app >>>is >>>started. >> >> --- >> Certainly if WLM was my creation it would work as advertised, as >> everything I do does. >> >> If it doesn't, for you, then I'd suspect cockpit error is the problem >> and you should get in touch with Microsoft instead of whining about >> your problems to me. > >You were whining about the double post
--- Nope, just commenting on its having been posted twice by your nervous little fingers. ---
> - I told you why that happened -
--- Yes, you did, but I've seen no other double posts from you that support your position that "See what Microsoft made me do?" is valid. Ergo, your blaming Microsoft for your inability to use their tools in a workmanlike manner puts the onus on you to prove that their tools are defective and, if you can't, brands you as at least deluded, or one step up from that, an objective liar. In the end, if you're serious and Microsoft gives you heartburn, you'd get a non-Microsoft usenet client more suited to your vagaries. You won't, of course, since you'd rather stay in the limelight and cast aspersions. -- JF
Reply by John Fields February 28, 20132013-02-28
On Thu, 28 Feb 2013 17:12:44 -0000, "Ian Field"
<gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> > >"John Fields" <jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >news:005ti8teodnr7f85qiknk5sqn420iec20o@4ax.com... >> On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 22:02:54 -0000, "Ian Field" >> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >> >>> >>> >>>"John Fields" <jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >>>news:rtosi81fiefb5ob9i0r6vqo2ki5cdhkgrt@4ax.com... >>>> On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 16:17:04 -0000, "Ian Field" >>>> <gangprobing.alien@ntlworld.com> wrote: >>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>>"John Fields" <jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote in message >>>>>news:mcbqi8t00ur6s6sk6kmuskjtkpg28fegtm@4ax.com... >>>> >>>>>> My request was about having you describe the dynamics of a >>>>>> light-bulb-in-series-with-a-battery current limiter which, no matter >>>>>> how loudly or how long you squeal excuses about why you can't, you >>>>>> can't, of course. >>>>> >>>>>The bulb trick isn't that great because of its pronounced PTC >>>>>characteristic - as the filament voltage decreases the current doesn't >>>>>decrease in due proportion. >>>> >>>> --- >>>> ??? >>>> >>>> If a you want the current to change linearly with voltage, then a >>>> simple resistor will do the trick so, obviously, you don't understand >>>> how the bulb trick works. >>>> --- >>>> >>>>>I did try to dumb it down for you - I do hope I didn't use too many big >>>>>words for you! >>>> >>>> --- >>>> The words are no problem but it seems, for you, the theory _is_. >>>> >>>> Would you like me to explain how the bulb trick works in terms even >>>> you could understand? >>> >>> >>>You're so scattered I wouldn't trust anything from you even if it "looked" >>>right! >> >> --- >> So far, everything you thought "looked right" wasn't, so you're >> certainly in no position to judge. >> --- >> >>>All that weed you keep smoking has given you dopers crott. >> >> --- >> You seem to be talking about something you know nothing about and >> issuing edicts based on fear. > > >From the scattered states I've seen dopers like you get in, I'm very glad I >know nothing about it.
--- Ignorance is bliss and, scattered, to you, seems to be your fearful evaluation of someone functioning on a higher plane which isn't within your grasp. As we often say, "Reality is for those who can't handle drugs." -- JF