Reply by John Fields March 30, 20122012-03-30
On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 16:56:35 -0400, "Tom Del Rosso"
<td_03@verizon.net.invalid> wrote:

> >Joel Koltner wrote: >> >> Here's a bizarre news story from the past few days: >> http://abcnews.go.com/US/church-stages-fake-kidnapping-youth-group-students/story?id=16012844#.T3YCAtXLu9H >> . In brief: A church staged a fake kidnapping -- complete with a real >> (albeit unloaded) AK-47 and a pastor made up to appear bloody and >> bruised -- of their youth group ostensibly to help them better >> understand Christian persecution. >> >> I'm sure that "lesson" is indeed going to be "memorable" to all of >> those involved... especially some of the adults who should be facing >> jail time for pulling off such nonsense. > >I had a memorable lesson once. In Catholic grade school the substitute >teachers were always strangers from other schools, but for religion class >the sub was a nun or priest since they always had a lot of free time. > >One day the substitute was Father McGirl. He described an event in which a >crowd of people "spoke in tongues" and "fire danced on their heads." > >"What do we call that...Mister Del Rosso?" > >"Uh, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception?" > >Father McGirl made a very long scream as if in agony, and threw himself >against the black board in a crucified position. > >He hung there motionless for several seconds. > >Then he turned around and said, "P-E-N-T-E-C-O-S-T!!!" > >That was a very effective teaching technique. I still don't know what the >Feast of the Immaculate Conception is, but I never forgot Pentecost.
--- Fun. :-) Reminds me of the old movie line where the prof asked: "Who was the first person to advocate asexual reproduction?", which elicited a reply of: "Your wife." -- JF
Reply by Jim Thompson March 30, 20122012-03-30
On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 16:47:06 -0500, John Fields
<jfields@austininstruments.com> wrote:

>On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 11:55:54 -0700, Jim Thompson ><To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: > >>On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 11:17:49 -0700, Joel Koltner >><zapwire-usenet@yahoo.com> wrote: >> >>>Phil Hobbs wrote: >>>> There are lots of dumb questions. That "there are no dumb questions" is >>>> a convenient fiction to try to persuade people to speak up in >>>> class--sort of like "we're all equals here" in a brainstorming session. >>> >>>I had a circuits class where a student asked some >>>relevant-but-very-basic question (I don't recall what anymore) and the >>>prof really laid into him about how it was he couldn't possibly know the >>>answer himself, he should have learned that in EE 101 (or perhaps grade >>>school), etc. >>> >>>I figured that since passing EE 101 (or whatever it was) was a >>>prerequisite for the prof's class, the kid not knowing it might say more >>>about how poor the EE 101 profs were than the kid's own shortcomings. >>> >>>That prof -- while pretty savvy -- had a reputation for laying into >>>student like that. I was amazed one day to see in the campus paper that >>>he was a member of a group calling themselves the Good Christian >>>Professors or somesuch (I'm just making up the name there, as again I >>>don't recall what it really was) and suggesting that students should >>>feel free to contact any of the members of the group if they had >>>questions regarding their spirituality or similar. >>> >>>Knowing how he treated kids in class, I kinda chuckled a bit, thinking >>>that in a million years I wouldn't *ever* be tempted to go see the >>>fellow regarding faith; I could only imagine what kind of lecturing he'd >>>give you if you weren't quite up on who did what, where and when in the >>>Bible! :-) >> >>Those types are _always_ so "Christian". >> >>Somewhere back in time, ~35-40 years ago, a neighbor woman was in our >>(North Scottsdale) kitchen having coffee with my wife. She opined how >>she couldn't understand why our children were so well-behaved since we >>never went to church. I threw her out of the house, "Don't ever >>return" :-) >> >> ...Jim Thompson >--- >Thereby proving their good behavior was all your wife's fault...
It's all about balance... when she was angry with the kids, I was laughing at their pranks, and vice versa ;-) But I do marvel how the boys, in particular, survived some of their stunts. ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson, CTO | mens | | Analog Innovations, Inc. | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | Phoenix, Arizona 85048 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
Reply by John Fields March 30, 20122012-03-30
On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 12:51:12 -0700, Jim Thompson
<To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote:

>On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 15:24:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs ><pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote: > >>On 03/30/2012 02:55 PM, Jim Thompson wrote: >>> On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 11:17:49 -0700, Joel Koltner >>> <zapwire-usenet@yahoo.com> wrote: >>> >>>> Phil Hobbs wrote: >>>>> There are lots of dumb questions. That "there are no dumb questions" is >>>>> a convenient fiction to try to persuade people to speak up in >>>>> class--sort of like "we're all equals here" in a brainstorming session. >>>> >>>> I had a circuits class where a student asked some >>>> relevant-but-very-basic question (I don't recall what anymore) and the >>>> prof really laid into him about how it was he couldn't possibly know the >>>> answer himself, he should have learned that in EE 101 (or perhaps grade >>>> school), etc. >>>> >>>> I figured that since passing EE 101 (or whatever it was) was a >>>> prerequisite for the prof's class, the kid not knowing it might say more >>>> about how poor the EE 101 profs were than the kid's own shortcomings. >>>> >>>> That prof -- while pretty savvy -- had a reputation for laying into >>>> student like that. I was amazed one day to see in the campus paper that >>>> he was a member of a group calling themselves the Good Christian >>>> Professors or somesuch (I'm just making up the name there, as again I >>>> don't recall what it really was) and suggesting that students should >>>> feel free to contact any of the members of the group if they had >>>> questions regarding their spirituality or similar. >>>> >>>> Knowing how he treated kids in class, I kinda chuckled a bit, thinking >>>> that in a million years I wouldn't *ever* be tempted to go see the >>>> fellow regarding faith; I could only imagine what kind of lecturing he'd >>>> give you if you weren't quite up on who did what, where and when in the >>>> Bible! :-) >>> >>> Those types are _always_ so "Christian". >>> >>> Somewhere back in time, ~35-40 years ago, a neighbor woman was in our >>> (North Scottsdale) kitchen having coffee with my wife. She opined how >>> she couldn't understand why our children were so well-behaved since we >>> never went to church. I threw her out of the house, "Don't ever >>> return" :-) >>> >>> ...Jim Thompson >> >>Thereby doubling her astonishment, since obviously your wife was the >>only one in the place who knew how to behave. >> >>Cheers >> >>Phil Hobbs > >Yes. My wife is tolerant of ignorance. I am not. > > ...Jim Thompson
--- Lucky you! ;) -- JF
Reply by John Fields March 30, 20122012-03-30
On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 11:55:54 -0700, Jim Thompson
<To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote:

>On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 11:17:49 -0700, Joel Koltner ><zapwire-usenet@yahoo.com> wrote: > >>Phil Hobbs wrote: >>> There are lots of dumb questions. That "there are no dumb questions" is >>> a convenient fiction to try to persuade people to speak up in >>> class--sort of like "we're all equals here" in a brainstorming session. >> >>I had a circuits class where a student asked some >>relevant-but-very-basic question (I don't recall what anymore) and the >>prof really laid into him about how it was he couldn't possibly know the >>answer himself, he should have learned that in EE 101 (or perhaps grade >>school), etc. >> >>I figured that since passing EE 101 (or whatever it was) was a >>prerequisite for the prof's class, the kid not knowing it might say more >>about how poor the EE 101 profs were than the kid's own shortcomings. >> >>That prof -- while pretty savvy -- had a reputation for laying into >>student like that. I was amazed one day to see in the campus paper that >>he was a member of a group calling themselves the Good Christian >>Professors or somesuch (I'm just making up the name there, as again I >>don't recall what it really was) and suggesting that students should >>feel free to contact any of the members of the group if they had >>questions regarding their spirituality or similar. >> >>Knowing how he treated kids in class, I kinda chuckled a bit, thinking >>that in a million years I wouldn't *ever* be tempted to go see the >>fellow regarding faith; I could only imagine what kind of lecturing he'd >>give you if you weren't quite up on who did what, where and when in the >>Bible! :-) > >Those types are _always_ so "Christian". > >Somewhere back in time, ~35-40 years ago, a neighbor woman was in our >(North Scottsdale) kitchen having coffee with my wife. She opined how >she couldn't understand why our children were so well-behaved since we >never went to church. I threw her out of the house, "Don't ever >return" :-) > > ...Jim Thompson
--- Thereby proving their good behavior was all your wife's fault... -- JF
Reply by Jim Thompson March 30, 20122012-03-30
On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 16:56:35 -0400, "Tom Del Rosso"
<td_03@verizon.net.invalid> wrote:

> >Joel Koltner wrote: >> >> Here's a bizarre news story from the past few days: >> http://abcnews.go.com/US/church-stages-fake-kidnapping-youth-group-students/story?id=16012844#.T3YCAtXLu9H >> . In brief: A church staged a fake kidnapping -- complete with a real >> (albeit unloaded) AK-47 and a pastor made up to appear bloody and >> bruised -- of their youth group ostensibly to help them better >> understand Christian persecution. >> >> I'm sure that "lesson" is indeed going to be "memorable" to all of >> those involved... especially some of the adults who should be facing >> jail time for pulling off such nonsense. > >I had a memorable lesson once. In Catholic grade school the substitute >teachers were always strangers from other schools, but for religion class >the sub was a nun or priest since they always had a lot of free time. > >One day the substitute was Father McGirl. He described an event in which a >crowd of people "spoke in tongues" and "fire danced on their heads." > >"What do we call that...Mister Del Rosso?" > >"Uh, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception?" > >Father McGirl made a very long scream as if in agony, and threw himself >against the black board in a crucified position. > >He hung there motionless for several seconds. > >Then he turned around and said, "P-E-N-T-E-C-O-S-T!!!" > >That was a very effective teaching technique. I still don't know what the >Feast of the Immaculate Conception is, but I never forgot Pentecost.
In High School and my first summer back from MIT I made a bundle of money tutoring Catholic elementary and high school kids... probably driven by parental expectations... none of them were in really bad shape... mostly just screwing around... typical boys :-) ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson, CTO | mens | | Analog Innovations, Inc. | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | Phoenix, Arizona 85048 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
Reply by Tom Del Rosso March 30, 20122012-03-30
Joel Koltner wrote:
> > Here's a bizarre news story from the past few days: > http://abcnews.go.com/US/church-stages-fake-kidnapping-youth-group-students/story?id=16012844#.T3YCAtXLu9H > . In brief: A church staged a fake kidnapping -- complete with a real > (albeit unloaded) AK-47 and a pastor made up to appear bloody and > bruised -- of their youth group ostensibly to help them better > understand Christian persecution. > > I'm sure that "lesson" is indeed going to be "memorable" to all of > those involved... especially some of the adults who should be facing > jail time for pulling off such nonsense.
I had a memorable lesson once. In Catholic grade school the substitute teachers were always strangers from other schools, but for religion class the sub was a nun or priest since they always had a lot of free time. One day the substitute was Father McGirl. He described an event in which a crowd of people "spoke in tongues" and "fire danced on their heads." "What do we call that...Mister Del Rosso?" "Uh, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception?" Father McGirl made a very long scream as if in agony, and threw himself against the black board in a crucified position. He hung there motionless for several seconds. Then he turned around and said, "P-E-N-T-E-C-O-S-T!!!" That was a very effective teaching technique. I still don't know what the Feast of the Immaculate Conception is, but I never forgot Pentecost. -- Reply in group, but if emailing add one more zero, and remove the last word.
Reply by Jim Thompson March 30, 20122012-03-30
On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 15:24:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs
<pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

>On 03/30/2012 02:55 PM, Jim Thompson wrote: >> On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 11:17:49 -0700, Joel Koltner >> <zapwire-usenet@yahoo.com> wrote: >> >>> Phil Hobbs wrote: >>>> There are lots of dumb questions. That "there are no dumb questions" is >>>> a convenient fiction to try to persuade people to speak up in >>>> class--sort of like "we're all equals here" in a brainstorming session. >>> >>> I had a circuits class where a student asked some >>> relevant-but-very-basic question (I don't recall what anymore) and the >>> prof really laid into him about how it was he couldn't possibly know the >>> answer himself, he should have learned that in EE 101 (or perhaps grade >>> school), etc. >>> >>> I figured that since passing EE 101 (or whatever it was) was a >>> prerequisite for the prof's class, the kid not knowing it might say more >>> about how poor the EE 101 profs were than the kid's own shortcomings. >>> >>> That prof -- while pretty savvy -- had a reputation for laying into >>> student like that. I was amazed one day to see in the campus paper that >>> he was a member of a group calling themselves the Good Christian >>> Professors or somesuch (I'm just making up the name there, as again I >>> don't recall what it really was) and suggesting that students should >>> feel free to contact any of the members of the group if they had >>> questions regarding their spirituality or similar. >>> >>> Knowing how he treated kids in class, I kinda chuckled a bit, thinking >>> that in a million years I wouldn't *ever* be tempted to go see the >>> fellow regarding faith; I could only imagine what kind of lecturing he'd >>> give you if you weren't quite up on who did what, where and when in the >>> Bible! :-) >> >> Those types are _always_ so "Christian". >> >> Somewhere back in time, ~35-40 years ago, a neighbor woman was in our >> (North Scottsdale) kitchen having coffee with my wife. She opined how >> she couldn't understand why our children were so well-behaved since we >> never went to church. I threw her out of the house, "Don't ever >> return" :-) >> >> ...Jim Thompson > >Thereby doubling her astonishment, since obviously your wife was the >only one in the place who knew how to behave. > >Cheers > >Phil Hobbs
Yes. My wife is tolerant of ignorance. I am not. ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson, CTO | mens | | Analog Innovations, Inc. | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | Phoenix, Arizona 85048 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
Reply by Phil Hobbs March 30, 20122012-03-30
On 03/30/2012 02:55 PM, Jim Thompson wrote:
> On Fri, 30 Mar 2012 11:17:49 -0700, Joel Koltner > <zapwire-usenet@yahoo.com> wrote: > >> Phil Hobbs wrote: >>> There are lots of dumb questions. That "there are no dumb questions" is >>> a convenient fiction to try to persuade people to speak up in >>> class--sort of like "we're all equals here" in a brainstorming session. >> >> I had a circuits class where a student asked some >> relevant-but-very-basic question (I don't recall what anymore) and the >> prof really laid into him about how it was he couldn't possibly know the >> answer himself, he should have learned that in EE 101 (or perhaps grade >> school), etc. >> >> I figured that since passing EE 101 (or whatever it was) was a >> prerequisite for the prof's class, the kid not knowing it might say more >> about how poor the EE 101 profs were than the kid's own shortcomings. >> >> That prof -- while pretty savvy -- had a reputation for laying into >> student like that. I was amazed one day to see in the campus paper that >> he was a member of a group calling themselves the Good Christian >> Professors or somesuch (I'm just making up the name there, as again I >> don't recall what it really was) and suggesting that students should >> feel free to contact any of the members of the group if they had >> questions regarding their spirituality or similar. >> >> Knowing how he treated kids in class, I kinda chuckled a bit, thinking >> that in a million years I wouldn't *ever* be tempted to go see the >> fellow regarding faith; I could only imagine what kind of lecturing he'd >> give you if you weren't quite up on who did what, where and when in the >> Bible! :-) > > Those types are _always_ so "Christian". > > Somewhere back in time, ~35-40 years ago, a neighbor woman was in our > (North Scottsdale) kitchen having coffee with my wife. She opined how > she couldn't understand why our children were so well-behaved since we > never went to church. I threw her out of the house, "Don't ever > return" :-) > > ...Jim Thompson
Thereby doubling her astonishment, since obviously your wife was the only one in the place who knew how to behave. Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 845-480-2058 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net
Reply by Phil Hobbs March 30, 20122012-03-30
On 03/30/2012 02:17 PM, Joel Koltner wrote:
> Phil Hobbs wrote: >> There are lots of dumb questions. That "there are no dumb questions" is >> a convenient fiction to try to persuade people to speak up in >> class--sort of like "we're all equals here" in a brainstorming session. > > I had a circuits class where a student asked some > relevant-but-very-basic question (I don't recall what anymore) and the > prof really laid into him about how it was he couldn't possibly know the > answer himself, he should have learned that in EE 101 (or perhaps grade > school), etc. > > I figured that since passing EE 101 (or whatever it was) was a > prerequisite for the prof's class, the kid not knowing it might say more > about how poor the EE 101 profs were than the kid's own shortcomings. > > That prof -- while pretty savvy -- had a reputation for laying into > student like that. I was amazed one day to see in the campus paper that > he was a member of a group calling themselves the Good Christian > Professors or somesuch (I'm just making up the name there, as again I > don't recall what it really was) and suggesting that students should > feel free to contact any of the members of the group if they had > questions regarding their spirituality or similar. > > Knowing how he treated kids in class, I kinda chuckled a bit, thinking > that in a million years I wouldn't *ever* be tempted to go see the > fellow regarding faith; I could only imagine what kind of lecturing he'd > give you if you weren't quite up on who did what, where and when in the > Bible! :-) >
One of the great saints of the Church, Teresa of Avila or somebody like that, said that "it's only the storm outside that makes the stench inside bearable." She was talking in the first instance about her own sins, as we all should, but it's also true in general. The fact that we're surrounded by sinners--people who know how they should act, but don't--is one of the basic data that goes into the theist view. (Once we realize that we're no better ourselves, the Gospel starts to make sense.) Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 845-480-2058 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net
Reply by Joel Koltner March 30, 20122012-03-30
Jim Thompson wrote:
> Somewhere back in time, ~35-40 years ago, a neighbor woman was in our > (North Scottsdale) kitchen having coffee with my wife. She opined how > she couldn't understand why our children were so well-behaved since we > never went to church. I threw her out of the house, "Don't ever > return" :-)
:-) Here's a bizarre news story from the past few days: http://abcnews.go.com/US/church-stages-fake-kidnapping-youth-group-students/story?id=16012844#.T3YCAtXLu9H . In brief: A church staged a fake kidnapping -- complete with a real (albeit unloaded) AK-47 and a pastor made up to appear bloody and bruised -- of their youth group ostensibly to help them better understand Christian persecution. I'm sure that "lesson" is indeed going to be "memorable" to all of those involved... especially some of the adults who should be facing jail time for pulling off such nonsense. ---Joel