Reply by Michael A. Terrell March 10, 20122012-03-10
Don Y wrote:
> > Hi Michael, > > On 3/8/2012 7:06 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote: > > >> Understood. My "small tools" collection would never fit! :> > >> E.g., I have ~dozen different "planes" -- scrubs, jointers, > >> jacks, spokeshave, block, smoothings, etc. The jointers barely > >> qualify as "small" (24 inches long). Easily 150+ "drivers" > >> (sets of phillips, slotted, hex, torx, clutch, square, pozidriv, > >> Reed& Prince, etc.), etc. > > > > I bought 100 new #2 Philips once for $20. I was going to grind the > > ends off and braze torx& other security bits to them but they turned > > out to be a lot better quality than I expected. That was over 15 years > > ago, and I haven't worn out any of the ones I've used. > > We had a (secret) "employee store" where you could buy claw hammers > for 5c, jointer planes for $1, etc. Of course, the "selection" > varied greatly/unpredictably, so you couldn't count on finding some > particular item that you needed, there. But, if you're a teenager > accumulating tools for your "life to come", who cares if you end up > with nutdrivers this week, planes next week, hand saws the week > after, etc.?
One place let you go to the tool room and get a scrap pass for returned hand tools. Most were damaged, but some were from people who were fired, quit or retired and look almost new. You could also get small items they had junked, before it was moved to the area where a local surplus shop bought it by the pound. I got a bunch of modules for the PRC-77 that had been through life cycle testing. They all worked, but couldn't be shipped in radios.
> I had thought of taking small 1U-4U servers, discarding the > electronics inside, *keeping* the rails and fabricating a > heavy duty set of drawers out of those. But, too much work > and I'd end up with a hodge-podge of oddball looking drawer > fronts. "Hmmm... did I put the hammers in the IBM or the HP?"
Everyone knows that the hammers go in the Dell servers. Woodworking tools go in the IBM servers and the metalworking tools go in the HP.
> Dad already had that sort of stuff in his shop. But, you knew > you weren't going to be "walking away with" any of that when > you moved out! :>
I had the opposite problem. I had mere and better tools than my dad, and they kept disappearing into his collection.
> > The Acro Mills cabinets are recessed enough to protect the drawers > > The cabinets I have are also made my Akro Mills. It doesn't appear > that they are still in production, though. Mine have 60 drawers > (10 rows of 6). My searches only turned up 64 drawer products... > > When the drawers are fully inserted, the tip of the handle is > "behind" the plane formed by the face of the metal cabinet. But > just *barely*. I.e., if you put an inflexible sheet of wood > across the face, the drawers would be safe -- from all but violent > blows. > > However, simply sliding the cabinets back into the cardboard > (paper?) "sleeves" that they were wrapped with when purchased > doesn't give that sort of protection. The wadded up saran wrap > coupled with shipping the cabinets in pairs -- face to face -- > was what enabled me to keep them for all these years (and > through all those *moves*) without busting the drawers.
I used thick corrugated cardboard, about 1/4" thick that was the same size as the cabinets. Then they were stacked under a workbench that had been a PDP-8 computer in a factory.
> > > The 'handle' is small, compared to other brands. Her is a smaller > > version of the metal cabinet type I have: > > > > I used the tape on the sides of the cabinets, with a piece of > > cardboard between each pair. I hauled them well over 1000 miles in my > > old stepvan when i moved, and only a couple parts vibrated out of the > > 1000+ drawers. > > Try entrusting them to professional monkeys^W movers! :<
I moved myself. 17,000+ pounds of tools, parts manuals and personal items in two trips in a stepvan.
> > > The residue on the painted steel was easy to remove with > > Goo Gone. > > GooGone/acetone will remove the paint from these (they are very > old). I'd even be hesitant to use spirits on them, at this > point. Other cleaners (awesome, etc.) dull the finish (and > I would never use around the clear "plastic")
I printed folded liners with the labels to fit inside the drawers. Not only did you not need to stick them to the drawers, they were easy to replace.
> > Then use velcro. :) > > Or LUGGAGE TAGS! :> Much less effort: un-"buckle" the strap on > the tag; slip it around one of the handles of the bag; re-buckle > the strap. Want to change the label? Slide out the business > card and mark up another...
As long as there is no chance of them getting caught on something. :)
> I visit the local recyclers and cherry-pick through the > scrap. At pennies a pound, they don't even care if I take > a few items out. Though, at some point, some pencil-neck > is probably going to throw a fit over the "liability issue" > and prohibit *anyone* from doing this sort of thing. > (You actually have to be careful to plan how you will > get in and out of the "dumpsters" -- the size of semi > trailers -- BEFORE you climb in lest you get trapped > in there! Hint: make sure there is a big pile of stuff > *somewhere* that you can climb *up* to get back to the > top, again) > > I took the bottoms of a few blade servers to make a cart > (heavy gauge steel, not aluminum). But, that still means I > will have to cut the pieces to get the size that I want, etc. > (though I won't have to worry about making that nice *crease*!)
That is where air tools come in handy. :) -- You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
Reply by Don Y March 9, 20122012-03-09
Hi Michael,

On 3/8/2012 7:06 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

>> Understood. My "small tools" collection would never fit! :> >> E.g., I have ~dozen different "planes" -- scrubs, jointers, >> jacks, spokeshave, block, smoothings, etc. The jointers barely >> qualify as "small" (24 inches long). Easily 150+ "drivers" >> (sets of phillips, slotted, hex, torx, clutch, square, pozidriv, >> Reed& Prince, etc.), etc. > > I bought 100 new #2 Philips once for $20. I was going to grind the > ends off and braze torx& other security bits to them but they turned > out to be a lot better quality than I expected. That was over 15 years > ago, and I haven't worn out any of the ones I've used.
We had a (secret) "employee store" where you could buy claw hammers for 5c, jointer planes for $1, etc. Of course, the "selection" varied greatly/unpredictably, so you couldn't count on finding some particular item that you needed, there. But, if you're a teenager accumulating tools for your "life to come", who cares if you end up with nutdrivers this week, planes next week, hand saws the week after, etc.?
>> I'd need a couple of really wide (though shallow) drawers >> for each sort of tool. :< Hence the idea of one of those >> really large (wall size) rolling toolboxes. > > I'm making long, full width drawers for those relay racks. They are > almost three feet deep, and the drawers will be about 22 inches wide, in > various depths.
I had thought of taking small 1U-4U servers, discarding the electronics inside, *keeping* the rails and fabricating a heavy duty set of drawers out of those. But, too much work and I'd end up with a hodge-podge of oddball looking drawer fronts. "Hmmm... did I put the hammers in the IBM or the HP?"
>>> I prefered to buy my own, so I always got the same kind. >> >> When you're 10, you much prefer someone else buying them for you! :> >> I picked out the first one and the others were just "repeats". >> Not much "surprise" involved each time I got one -- but at least >> I knew I would get what I *wanted*! > > No, I asked for things like 100 foot extennsion cords and a propane > torch when I was that age. Scared the daylights out of my parents! :)
Dad already had that sort of stuff in his shop. But, you knew you weren't going to be "walking away with" any of that when you moved out! :>
>>> I used pieces of carboard between the faces of pairs of cabinets and >>> packing tape when I moved. >> >> Tape sticks to the surfaces. I wrap each drawer in saran wrap >> (then slide it back in) and the entire cabinet with it. Wrapping each >> drawer results in some "excess" bunching up in front of each drawer >> which acts to cushion the little plastic handles. > > The Acro Mills cabinets are recessed enough to protect the drawers
The cabinets I have are also made my Akro Mills. It doesn't appear that they are still in production, though. Mine have 60 drawers (10 rows of 6). My searches only turned up 64 drawer products... When the drawers are fully inserted, the tip of the handle is "behind" the plane formed by the face of the metal cabinet. But just *barely*. I.e., if you put an inflexible sheet of wood across the face, the drawers would be safe -- from all but violent blows. However, simply sliding the cabinets back into the cardboard (paper?) "sleeves" that they were wrapped with when purchased doesn't give that sort of protection. The wadded up saran wrap coupled with shipping the cabinets in pairs -- face to face -- was what enabled me to keep them for all these years (and through all those *moves*) without busting the drawers.
> The 'handle' is small, compared to other brands. Her is a smaller > version of the metal cabinet type I have: > > I used the tape on the sides of the cabinets, with a piece of > cardboard between each pair. I hauled them well over 1000 miles in my > old stepvan when i moved, and only a couple parts vibrated out of the > 1000+ drawers.
Try entrusting them to professional monkeys^W movers! :<
> The residue on the painted steel was easy to remove with > Goo Gone.
GooGone/acetone will remove the paint from these (they are very old). I'd even be hesitant to use spirits on them, at this point. Other cleaners (awesome, etc.) dull the finish (and I would never use around the clear "plastic")
>>> Fabric glue is flexible, and holds fabric quite well. My mother was >>> a seamstress and used it for some repairs, when stitches would show. >> >> I don't doubt it holds. My objection is removing it -- changing a >> label, etc. The leather "luggage tag" approach seems to work well. >> Looks like it belongs -- without drawing attention to itself. > > Then use velcro. :)
Or LUGGAGE TAGS! :> Much less effort: un-"buckle" the strap on the tag; slip it around one of the handles of the bag; re-buckle the strap. Want to change the label? Slide out the business card and mark up another...
>>> There is a Japanese patent on a machine that grinds up old circuit >>> boards to recover the metals. If the boards are fiberglass, they use >>> acid to remove the remaining metal, then rinse it and sell the shreaded >>> fiberglass for reuse in things like Spas and other fiberglass products. >>> I harvest some parts off old boards before sending them to a recycler. >> >> Lately, I have been digging through the *cases* looking for >> particular shapes of metal pieces (I REALLY wish I owned a >> brake!). > > I have this small brake: > > Here are a couple more: > > I kept the cases of some early, tall tower cases. It is a lot thicker > than that in newer, smaller computer cases. I have about a half ton of > used angle iron& other metal stored behind my garage in what was one of > two horse stalls. The other is used to pile up scrap metal, till there > is enough to sell for scrap.
I visit the local recyclers and cherry-pick through the scrap. At pennies a pound, they don't even care if I take a few items out. Though, at some point, some pencil-neck is probably going to throw a fit over the "liability issue" and prohibit *anyone* from doing this sort of thing. (You actually have to be careful to plan how you will get in and out of the "dumpsters" -- the size of semi trailers -- BEFORE you climb in lest you get trapped in there! Hint: make sure there is a big pile of stuff *somewhere* that you can climb *up* to get back to the top, again) I took the bottoms of a few blade servers to make a cart (heavy gauge steel, not aluminum). But, that still means I will have to cut the pieces to get the size that I want, etc. (though I won't have to worry about making that nice *crease*!)
Reply by Michael A. Terrell March 8, 20122012-03-08
Don Y wrote:
> > Hi Michael, > > On 3/7/2012 4:55 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:
> Understood. My "small tools" collection would never fit! :> > E.g., I have ~dozen different "planes" -- scrubs, jointers, > jacks, spokeshave, block, smoothings, etc. The jointers barely > qualify as "small" (24 inches long). Easily 150+ "drivers" > (sets of phillips, slotted, hex, torx, clutch, square, pozidriv, > Reed & Prince, etc.), etc.
I bought 100 new #2 Philips once for $20. I was going to grind the ends off and braze torx & other security bits to them but they turned out to be a lot better quality than I expected. That was over 15 years ago, and I haven't worn out any of the ones I've used.
> I'd need a couple of really wide (though shallow) drawers > for each sort of tool. :< Hence the idea of one of those > really large (wall size) rolling toolboxes.
I'm making long, full width drawers for those relay racks. They are almost three feet deep, and the drawers will be about 22 inches wide, in various depths.
> > I prefered to buy my own, so I always got the same kind. > > When you're 10, you much prefer someone else buying them for you! :> > I picked out the first one and the others were just "repeats". > Not much "surprise" involved each time I got one -- but at least > I knew I would get what I *wanted*!
No, I asked for things like 100 foot extennsion cords and a propane torch when I was that age. Scared the daylights out of my parents! :)
> > I used pieces of carboard between the faces of pairs of cabinets and > > packing tape when I moved. > > Tape sticks to the surfaces. I wrap each drawer in saran wrap > (then slide it back in) and the entire cabinet with it. Wrapping each > drawer results in some "excess" bunching up in front of each drawer > which acts to cushion the little plastic handles.
The Acro Mills cabinets are recessed enough to protect the drawers The 'handle' is small, compared to other brands. Her is a smaller version of the metal cabinet type I have: http://img0.etsystatic.com/il_fullxfull.309954248.jpg I used the tape on the sides of the cabinets, with a piece of cardboard between each pair. I hauled them well over 1000 miles in my old stepvan when i moved, and only a couple parts vibrated out of the 1000+ drawers. The residue on the painted steel was easy to remove with Goo Gone.
> > Fabric glue is flexible, and holds fabric quite well. My mother was > > a seamstress and used it for some repairs, when stitches would show. > > I don't doubt it holds. My objection is removing it -- changing a > label, etc. The leather "luggage tag" approach seems to work well. > Looks like it belongs -- without drawing attention to itself.
Then use velcro. :)
> > There is a Japanese patent on a machine that grinds up old circuit > > boards to recover the metals. If the boards are fiberglass, they use > > acid to remove the remaining metal, then rinse it and sell the shreaded > > fiberglass for reuse in things like Spas and other fiberglass products. > > I harvest some parts off old boards before sending them to a recycler. > > Lately, I have been digging through the *cases* looking for > particular shapes of metal pieces (I REALLY wish I owned a > brake!).
I have this small brake: http://www.harborfreight.com/18-inch-bending-brake-39103.html Here are a couple more: http://www.harborfreight.com/30-inch-bending-brake-67240.html http://www.harborfreight.com/36-inch-metal-brake-with-stand-91012.html I kept the cases of some early, tall tower cases. It is a lot thicker than that in newer, smaller computer cases. I have about a half ton of used angle iron & other metal stored behind my garage in what was one of two horse stalls. The other is used to pile up scrap metal, till there is enough to sell for scrap. -- You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
Reply by Don Y March 7, 20122012-03-07
On 3/7/2012 10:59 AM, krw@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

>> I'd need a couple of really wide (though shallow) drawers >> for each sort of tool. :< Hence the idea of one of those >> really large (wall size) rolling toolboxes. > > If you're really looking for one of those, HD has a pretty good price on their > stainless tool caddy. Both pieces are around $750, about half what I've seen > for similar units elsewhere. I've thought about it, but all of my tools > wouldn't fit and I don't need it for the small stuff, really. I also don't > know why I'd want it all on wheels.
I look at it each time I'm there. But, I'd need *two* of them *or* a way to *stack* them (my tools fill a volume 4'x1.5'x7' and that doesn't count anything with a power cord or "oversized" like wheel/pulley pullers, torque wrenches, levels, hand saws, dado jigs, etc.). The wheels are a non-issue -- they wouldn't offer me any added value (though might offer someone who does automechanics some added flexibility -- rolling it around a vehicle-in-repair). But, I probably wouldn't remove them if they were there... I am still looking for a solution that would address more of the storage issues -- tools, test equipment, etc.
Reply by krw...@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz March 7, 20122012-03-07
On Wed, 07 Mar 2012 10:11:19 -0700, Don Y <this@isnotme.com> wrote:

>Hi Michael, > >On 3/7/2012 4:55 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote: > >>>>> Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* >>>>> "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). >>>>> I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of >>>>> different hammers) >>>> >>>> This is over six feet tall and almost four feet wide. >>> >>> Yes, but how many hammers, chisels, saws, screw/nut-drivers, >>> crowbars, etc. can I store in it's drawers? :> Currently, >>> my "tool storage" (not counting the 3 kennedy boxes, what's >>> in the cars, sitting on my desk or in the "field service kit") >>> is a stack of 6x12x18 boxes 48 inches wide, 18 inches deep and >>> 7 feet tall. (I used to work for a company that manufactured > >----------------------------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ > >>> hand tools and had excellent employee benefits! :> ) >> >> that was built to store parts, and small tools. > >Understood. My "small tools" collection would never fit! :> >E.g., I have ~dozen different "planes" -- scrubs, jointers, >jacks, spokeshave, block, smoothings, etc. The jointers barely >qualify as "small" (24 inches long). Easily 150+ "drivers" >(sets of phillips, slotted, hex, torx, clutch, square, pozidriv, >Reed & Prince, etc.), etc. > >I'd need a couple of really wide (though shallow) drawers >for each sort of tool. :< Hence the idea of one of those >really large (wall size) rolling toolboxes.
If you're really looking for one of those, HD has a pretty good price on their stainless tool caddy. Both pieces are around $750, about half what I've seen for similar units elsewhere. I've thought about it, but all of my tools wouldn't fit and I don't need it for the small stuff, really. I also don't know why I'd want it all on wheels. <...>
Reply by Don Y March 7, 20122012-03-07
Hi Michael,

On 3/7/2012 4:55 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

>>>> Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* >>>> "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). >>>> I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of >>>> different hammers) >>> >>> This is over six feet tall and almost four feet wide. >> >> Yes, but how many hammers, chisels, saws, screw/nut-drivers, >> crowbars, etc. can I store in it's drawers? :> Currently, >> my "tool storage" (not counting the 3 kennedy boxes, what's >> in the cars, sitting on my desk or in the "field service kit") >> is a stack of 6x12x18 boxes 48 inches wide, 18 inches deep and >> 7 feet tall. (I used to work for a company that manufactured
----------------------------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>> hand tools and had excellent employee benefits! :> ) > > that was built to store parts, and small tools.
Understood. My "small tools" collection would never fit! :> E.g., I have ~dozen different "planes" -- scrubs, jointers, jacks, spokeshave, block, smoothings, etc. The jointers barely qualify as "small" (24 inches long). Easily 150+ "drivers" (sets of phillips, slotted, hex, torx, clutch, square, pozidriv, Reed & Prince, etc.), etc. I'd need a couple of really wide (though shallow) drawers for each sort of tool. :< Hence the idea of one of those really large (wall size) rolling toolboxes.
> I use old file > cabinets for some tools, and those large steel double door office > cabinets for others. I also have a pair of 24" wide relay racks with > locking doors, shelves and some 1/4" pegboard on walls. > >>>> I put the "part drawers" (mine hold 60 *little* drawers) on a portion >>>> of one of the garage walls. Unfortunately, the same wall has the door >>>> that enters the living area. Code requires it to be "self-closing". >>>> So, each time it slams, the part drawers nudge out just a little >>>> bit more. By the end of a week, I have to manually push them all >>>> back in. >>> >>> Some brands of cabinets are worse than others. Some drop slightly >>> when pushed all the way in. Most of these are over 40 years old, and >>> were industrial grade. I started buying them while I was in high >>> school. :) >> >> That's how I got these. It was the standard "gift" for me at >> the time when folks couldn't figure out what I might "want". >> I have 14 of them (= 840 drawers) that have survived the numerous >> moves. > > I prefered to buy my own, so I always got the same kind.
When you're 10, you much prefer someone else buying them for you! :> I picked out the first one and the others were just "repeats". Not much "surprise" involved each time I got one -- but at least I knew I would get what I *wanted*!
>>> Get some soft sheets of vinyl that will roll up, and hang it over >>> each row of cabinets. That should keep the drawers in place, and free >>> of dust. >> >> On a related note, when *moving* (i.e., cross country) these things, >> wrap the entire cabinet in "saran (plastic) wrap" to keep the drawers >> in place (the cardboard "wrappers/boxes" that I'd diligently kept >> over the decades eventually got torn and tattered from being slid on >> and off the drawer assemblies so many times). > > I used pieces of carboard between the faces of pairs of cabinets and > packing tape when I moved.
Tape sticks to the surfaces. I wrap each drawer in saran wrap (then slide it back in) and the entire cabinet with it. Wrapping each drawer results in some "excess" bunching up in front of each drawer which acts to cushion the little plastic handles.
>>>>> Printed labels on the end of each toolbox and sitting in rows on >>>>> shelves. In the order they are most used. >>>> >>>> Won't work for my "cloth"/canvas bags. >>> >>> A cloth label& fabric glue would. >> >> <shudder> Not fond of glue! > > Fabric glue is flexible, and holds fabric quite well. My mother was > a seamstress and used it for some repairs, when stitches would show.
I don't doubt it holds. My objection is removing it -- changing a label, etc. The leather "luggage tag" approach seems to work well. Looks like it belongs -- without drawing attention to itself.
>> There are shops in Mexico that will actually dismantle the TVs >> and harvest the electronics, etc. (though I suspect the heavy >> metals still end up finding their way into the ground!) > > There is a Japanese patent on a machine that grinds up old circuit > boards to recover the metals. If the boards are fiberglass, they use > acid to remove the remaining metal, then rinse it and sell the shreaded > fiberglass for reuse in things like Spas and other fiberglass products. > I harvest some parts off old boards before sending them to a recycler.
Lately, I have been digging through the *cases* looking for particular shapes of metal pieces (I REALLY wish I owned a brake!).
Reply by josephkk March 7, 20122012-03-07
On Tue, 06 Mar 2012 01:57:13 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"
<mike.terrell@earthlink.net> wrote:

> > >> There are many non-profits across the country that will work with >> you on projects like that. Some insist on 501(c)3 status but >> many just want you to "be credible". There is no shortage of >> surplus computers! <frown> > > > Around here, they are forcing them to go to 'recylers'. I lost my >last decent source a couple months ago when the city told them that all >unwanted electronics had to be recycled. of course, the companies on >their approved list all insist that they get ALL computer items or they >won't take the bad TVs. >
Yep. The law of (un)intended consequences. ?-)
Reply by josephkk March 7, 20122012-03-07
On Fri, 2 Mar 2012 20:19:18 -0500, "Martin Riddle"
<martin_rid@verizon.net> wrote:

> >"Don Y" <this@isnotme.com> wrote in message=20 >news:jiroi1$g6q$1@speranza.aioe.org... >> Hi Michael, >> >> On 3/2/2012 3:03 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote: >> >>>> I've deployed (wired) ethernet (CAT5, not 6) throughout the >>>> house. I chose to follow the "B" wiring color conventions >>>> in 8P8C's. >>>> >>>> But, from time to time, I end up adding or replacing an >>>> "RJ45" and always have to go through the effort of remembering >>>> which wiring scheme I originally chose. This is just plain >>>> annoying (useless timewaster!). >>>> >>>> What is "common practice" in this case? Should I have opted >>>> for "A" and just committed that fact to memory (similarly, >>>> commit my "B" choice to memory)? Or, tacked a small sign >>>> above the patch panel reminding me of that choice? >>>> >>>> Of course, accommodating either choice is just a matter of >>>> swapping pairs. But, deciding if and when that is necessary >>>> is the PITA (i.e., most connector bodies have color codes >>>> marked on them -- but, you then have to remember whether >>>> *this* code coincides with the scheme you have already >>>> implemented on the other end of the cable...) >>>> >>>> "Standards are great! Everyone should have one!!" :-/ >>> >>> The Leviton jacks I use have both sets of color codes on labels. No >> >> Yes, some of the jacks that I have are similar in that regard. >> >>> need to remember the pattern, just which system you use. If yours are >> >> *That* is exactly the issue! --------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ This isn't >> the sort of thing I do "often". I can tell you which conductor is >> tip/ring in a length of *quad* (since I've done a lot of that sort >> of wiring over the decades) but have only once had to wire a house >> with CAT5! :-/ >> >>> unmarked, take a scrap of Cat5 cable and terminate it, then leave it=20 >>> in >>> your networking crash kit. :) >> >> <frown> What would I have in such a "crash kit"? Currently, I >> keep spare cable, connectors (male/female), wall plates, appliances, >> etc. in specific places in the garage. I've not considered that >> these should be combined into a single location/kit... >> >> What I've been doing is just releasing the screws holding the patch >> panel in place and looking at the back side -- which is clearly >> labeled 568B. Then, putting it back in place and adjusting the >> pairs on the "RJ45" in question to correspond with that. >> >> It's just annoying to have to go through this "exercise" each time. >> (I should just write "B" on the front of the panel!) > >Rule: Use B >For the crimp connector, Tang on bottom wiring is left to right: >wht/org >Org >wht/grn >blu >wht/blu >grn >wht/brn >brn > >For the new cat 6 connectors with blue inserts, top row is solid colors,=
=20
>bottom row striped colors. > >See ><http://alatec.com/info/rj45.html> > >585A is only for crossover. Most nic's are auto sensing MDI/MDI-x and=20 >don't need the x-over cable. ><http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet_crossover_cable>
No. That is not the difference. The difference is pair number ordering. I have my own copy of ANSI/TIA-568. Since all cables (with maybe some exception for crossover cables) are pair for pair and pin for pin what = you have to remember is what you did at the other end of the cable.
> >Cheers >=20 >
Reply by Michael A. Terrell March 7, 20122012-03-07
Don Y wrote:
> > Hi Michael, > > On 3/5/2012 11:57 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote: > > >> Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* > >> "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). > >> I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of > >> different hammers) > > > > This is over six feet tall and almost four feet wide. > > Yes, but how many hammers, chisels, saws, screw/nut-drivers, > crowbars, etc. can I store in it's drawers? :> Currently, > my "tool storage" (not counting the 3 kennedy boxes, what's > in the cars, sitting on my desk or in the "field service kit") > is a stack of 6x12x18 boxes 48 inches wide, 18 inches deep and > 7 feet tall. (I used to work for a company that manufactured > hand tools and had excellent employee benefits! :> )
that was built to store parts, and small tools. I use old file cabinets for some tools, and those large steel double door office cabinets for others. I also have a pair of 24" wide relay racks with locking doors, shelves and some 1/4" pegboard on walls.
> >> I put the "part drawers" (mine hold 60 *little* drawers) on a portion > >> of one of the garage walls. Unfortunately, the same wall has the door > >> that enters the living area. Code requires it to be "self-closing". > >> So, each time it slams, the part drawers nudge out just a little > >> bit more. By the end of a week, I have to manually push them all > >> back in. > >> > >> <frown> Didn't anticipate that problem. > > > > Some brands of cabinets are worse than others. Some drop slightly > > when pushed all the way in. Most of these are over 40 years old, and > > were industrial grade. I started buying them while I was in high > > school. :) > > That's how I got these. It was the standard "gift" for me at > the time when folks couldn't figure out what I might "want". > I have 14 of them (= 840 drawers) that have survived the numerous > moves.
I prefered to buy my own, so I always got the same kind.
> > Get some soft sheets of vinyl that will roll up, and hang it over > > each row of cabinets. That should keep the drawers in place, and free > > of dust. > > On a related note, when *moving* (i.e., cross country) these things, > wrap the entire cabinet in "saran (plastic) wrap" to keep the drawers > in place (the cardboard "wrappers/boxes" that I'd diligently kept > over the decades eventually got torn and tattered from being slid on > and off the drawer assemblies so many times).
I used pieces of carboard between the faces of pairs of cabinets and packing tape when I moved.
> >>> Printed labels on the end of each toolbox and sitting in rows on > >>> shelves. In the order they are most used. > >> > >> Won't work for my "cloth"/canvas bags. > > > > A cloth label& fabric glue would. > > <shudder> Not fond of glue!
Fabric glue is flexible, and holds fabric quite well. My mother was a seamstress and used it for some repairs, when stitches would show.
> >> There are many non-profits across the country that will work with > >> you on projects like that. Some insist on 501(c)3 status but > >> many just want you to "be credible". There is no shortage of > >> surplus computers!<frown> > > > > Around here, they are forcing them to go to 'recylers'. I lost my > > last decent source a couple months ago when the city told them that all > > unwanted electronics had to be recycled. of course, the companies on > > their approved list all insist that they get ALL computer items or they > > won't take the bad TVs. > > TV's are treated like "ugly sisters". Here, you have to *pay* > to get someone to take your TV (I realize that is true in places > like Californica) just because there are so many of the damn > things. > > There are shops in Mexico that will actually dismantle the TVs > and harvest the electronics, etc. (though I suspect the heavy > metals still end up finding their way into the ground!)
There is a Japanese patent on a machine that grinds up old circuit boards to recover the metals. If the boards are fiberglass, they use acid to remove the remaining metal, then rinse it and sell the shreaded fiberglass for reuse in things like Spas and other fiberglass products. I harvest some parts off old boards before sending them to a recycler. -- You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
Reply by Don Y March 6, 20122012-03-06
Hi Michael,

On 3/5/2012 11:57 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

>> Sorry, I meant those *giant* rolling toolboxes that really *are* >> "room dividers" in size. (not the little roll around carts). >> I need lots of *drawers* for tools (e.g., I have a *box* of >> different hammers) > > This is over six feet tall and almost four feet wide.
Yes, but how many hammers, chisels, saws, screw/nut-drivers, crowbars, etc. can I store in it's drawers? :> Currently, my "tool storage" (not counting the 3 kennedy boxes, what's in the cars, sitting on my desk or in the "field service kit") is a stack of 6x12x18 boxes 48 inches wide, 18 inches deep and 7 feet tall. (I used to work for a company that manufactured hand tools and had excellent employee benefits! :> )
>> I put the "part drawers" (mine hold 60 *little* drawers) on a portion >> of one of the garage walls. Unfortunately, the same wall has the door >> that enters the living area. Code requires it to be "self-closing". >> So, each time it slams, the part drawers nudge out just a little >> bit more. By the end of a week, I have to manually push them all >> back in. >> >> <frown> Didn't anticipate that problem. > > Some brands of cabinets are worse than others. Some drop slightly > when pushed all the way in. Most of these are over 40 years old, and > were industrial grade. I started buying them while I was in high > school. :)
That's how I got these. It was the standard "gift" for me at the time when folks couldn't figure out what I might "want". I have 14 of them (= 840 drawers) that have survived the numerous moves.
> Get some soft sheets of vinyl that will roll up, and hang it over > each row of cabinets. That should keep the drawers in place, and free > of dust.
On a related note, when *moving* (i.e., cross country) these things, wrap the entire cabinet in "saran (plastic) wrap" to keep the drawers in place (the cardboard "wrappers/boxes" that I'd diligently kept over the decades eventually got torn and tattered from being slid on and off the drawer assemblies so many times).
>>> Printed labels on the end of each toolbox and sitting in rows on >>> shelves. In the order they are most used. >> >> Won't work for my "cloth"/canvas bags. > > A cloth label& fabric glue would.
<shudder> Not fond of glue!
>> There are many non-profits across the country that will work with >> you on projects like that. Some insist on 501(c)3 status but >> many just want you to "be credible". There is no shortage of >> surplus computers!<frown> > > Around here, they are forcing them to go to 'recylers'. I lost my > last decent source a couple months ago when the city told them that all > unwanted electronics had to be recycled. of course, the companies on > their approved list all insist that they get ALL computer items or they > won't take the bad TVs.
TV's are treated like "ugly sisters". Here, you have to *pay* to get someone to take your TV (I realize that is true in places like Californica) just because there are so many of the damn things. There are shops in Mexico that will actually dismantle the TVs and harvest the electronics, etc. (though I suspect the heavy metals still end up finding their way into the ground!)