Reply by Phil Allison November 15, 20192019-11-15
o pere o lunatic wrote:

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 > 
> > Sorry for the late reply. > > > > The clock uses about 25 Ma and the AAs lasted about 3 months. > > > > Andy > > > > A Duracell AA has 2850 mAh and a D 15000 mAh (*). So, a crude assumption > is that your D cell will last about 15 months. >
** What does 2850 / 25 / 24 = ?? .... Phil
Reply by o pere o November 15, 20192019-11-15
On 31/10/19 17:16, AK wrote:
> On Sunday, September 22, 2019 at 2:49:28 AM UTC-5, Phil Allison wrote: >> whit3rd wrote: >> >> ------------------ >>> >>> >>> No, the mAh rating comes with an explanation of the test conditions, >>> you just need the full manufacturer's data sheets. >>> >>> Sometimes there's a time/voltage graph, and you can chose the cutoff >>> voltage and measure area-under-the-I-V curve. >>> Sometimes there's a specified V when fresh, and V when dead >>> (alkaline, typically 1.5V fresh, 1.0V dead; lithium, typically 3.6V fresh, >>> 3.0V dead). >>> >> ----------------------------- >> >> ** The OP has indicted his load is a clock, dunno what kind but any battery clock will be engineered for absolute minimum DC current draw. >> >> Standard Quartz mechanisms are phenomenal current misers, alkaline AA cells last a year or more. Average currents being in the order of 100uA. >> >> It follows that a D size cell would last much longer, maybe 5 or 10 years. >> >> IOW, its entire shelf life. >> >> Matters more how fresh the cell is when you purchase it. >> >> >> >> .... Phil > > Sorry for the late reply. > > The clock uses about 25 Ma and the AAs lasted about 3 months. > > Andy >
A Duracell AA has 2850 mAh and a D 15000 mAh (*). So, a crude assumption is that your D cell will last about 15 months. (*) Looked it up some time ago Pere
Reply by Phil Allison November 14, 20192019-11-14
AK wrote:

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>
> > > Sorry for the late reply. > > > > > > The clock uses about 25 Ma and the AAs lasted about 3 months. > > > > > > > ** Oh dear - ROTFL > > > > So you only switch the clock on when you want to read the time > > - to save the batteries ? > > > > 25mA for 2160 hours = 54 amp hours. > > > > What brand AAs do you buy ? > > > > > > The clock is on continuously.
** Crikey - that must waste the battery !
> > I buy whatever AA that is on sale. >
** But where do you buy 54Ah ones ?? BTW: a dead donkey is about to kick you. .... Phil
Reply by AK November 13, 20192019-11-13
On Friday, November 1, 2019 at 5:16:46 PM UTC-5, Phil Allison wrote:
> AK wrote: > > ----------- > > > > > > > > ** The OP has indicted his load is a clock, dunno what kind but > > > any battery clock will be engineered for absolute minimum DC current draw. > > > > > > Standard Quartz mechanisms are phenomenal current misers, alkaline > > > AA cells last a year or more. Average currents being in the order of 100uA. > > > > > > It follows that a D size cell would last much longer, maybe 5 or 10 years. > > > > > > IOW, its entire shelf life. > > > > > > Matters more how fresh the cell is when you purchase it. > > > > > > > > > > > > Sorry for the late reply. > > > > The clock uses about 25 Ma and the AAs lasted about 3 months. > > > > ** Oh dear - ROTFL > > So you only switch the clock on when you want to read the time - to save the batteries ? > > 25mA for 2160 hours = 54 amp hours. > > What brand AAs do you buy ? > > > .... Phil
The clock is on continuously. I buy whatever AA that is on sale. Andy
Reply by Phil Allison November 1, 20192019-11-01
 AK wrote:

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> > > > > ** The OP has indicted his load is a clock, dunno what kind but > > any battery clock will be engineered for absolute minimum DC current draw. > > > > Standard Quartz mechanisms are phenomenal current misers, alkaline > > AA cells last a year or more. Average currents being in the order of 100uA. > > > > It follows that a D size cell would last much longer, maybe 5 or 10 years. > > > > IOW, its entire shelf life. > > > > Matters more how fresh the cell is when you purchase it. > > > > > > > Sorry for the late reply. > > The clock uses about 25 Ma and the AAs lasted about 3 months. >
** Oh dear - ROTFL So you only switch the clock on when you want to read the time - to save the batteries ? 25mA for 2160 hours = 54 amp hours. What brand AAs do you buy ? .... Phil
Reply by Jeroen Belleman November 1, 20192019-11-01
AK wrote:
> On Sunday, September 22, 2019 at 2:49:28 AM UTC-5, Phil Allison wrote: >> whit3rd wrote: >> >> ------------------ >>> >>> No, the mAh rating comes with an explanation of the test conditions, >>> you just need the full manufacturer's data sheets. >>> >>> Sometimes there's a time/voltage graph, and you can chose the cutoff >>> voltage and measure area-under-the-I-V curve. >>> Sometimes there's a specified V when fresh, and V when dead >>> (alkaline, typically 1.5V fresh, 1.0V dead; lithium, typically 3.6V fresh, >>> 3.0V dead). >>> >> ----------------------------- >> >> ** The OP has indicted his load is a clock, dunno what kind but any battery clock will be engineered for absolute minimum DC current draw. >> >> Standard Quartz mechanisms are phenomenal current misers, alkaline AA cells last a year or more. Average currents being in the order of 100uA. >> >> It follows that a D size cell would last much longer, maybe 5 or 10 years. >> >> IOW, its entire shelf life. >> >> Matters more how fresh the cell is when you purchase it. >> >> >> >> .... Phil > > Sorry for the late reply. > > The clock uses about 25 Ma and the AAs lasted about 3 months. > > Andy
That makes it a 54 GAh battery then. Some battery! Gentlemen, get your units straight! M=mega, m=milli, and in ASCII text, u=micro, which I guess is what you really meant. If so, 54 mAh is very poor for an AA. A fresh AA should be able to deliver about 1 Ah in a clock, maybe more. Jeroen Belleman
Reply by AK October 31, 20192019-10-31
On Sunday, September 22, 2019 at 2:49:28 AM UTC-5, Phil Allison wrote:
> whit3rd wrote: > > ------------------ > > > > > > No, the mAh rating comes with an explanation of the test conditions, > > you just need the full manufacturer's data sheets. > > > > Sometimes there's a time/voltage graph, and you can chose the cutoff > > voltage and measure area-under-the-I-V curve. > > Sometimes there's a specified V when fresh, and V when dead > > (alkaline, typically 1.5V fresh, 1.0V dead; lithium, typically 3.6V fresh, > > 3.0V dead). > > > ----------------------------- > > ** The OP has indicted his load is a clock, dunno what kind but any battery clock will be engineered for absolute minimum DC current draw. > > Standard Quartz mechanisms are phenomenal current misers, alkaline AA cells last a year or more. Average currents being in the order of 100uA. > > It follows that a D size cell would last much longer, maybe 5 or 10 years. > > IOW, its entire shelf life. > > Matters more how fresh the cell is when you purchase it. > > > > .... Phil
Sorry for the late reply. The clock uses about 25 Ma and the AAs lasted about 3 months. Andy
Reply by Phil Allison September 22, 20192019-09-22
whit3rd wrote:

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> > > No, the mAh rating comes with an explanation of the test conditions, > you just need the full manufacturer's data sheets. > > Sometimes there's a time/voltage graph, and you can chose the cutoff > voltage and measure area-under-the-I-V curve. > Sometimes there's a specified V when fresh, and V when dead > (alkaline, typically 1.5V fresh, 1.0V dead; lithium, typically 3.6V fresh, > 3.0V dead). >
----------------------------- ** The OP has indicted his load is a clock, dunno what kind but any battery clock will be engineered for absolute minimum DC current draw. Standard Quartz mechanisms are phenomenal current misers, alkaline AA cells last a year or more. Average currents being in the order of 100uA. It follows that a D size cell would last much longer, maybe 5 or 10 years. IOW, its entire shelf life. Matters more how fresh the cell is when you purchase it. .... Phil
Reply by whit3rd September 22, 20192019-09-22
On Friday, September 20, 2019 at 3:14:30 PM UTC-7, AK wrote:
> I want to calculate approx run time of a D cell with a capacity of 13,000 Mah. > > I assume that Time(H) = Capacity(Ah)/Current(A) equals a final battery voltage of 0 volts which will not work ...
No, the mAh rating comes with an explanation of the test conditions, you just need the full manufacturer's data sheets. Sometimes there's a time/voltage graph, and you can chose the cutoff voltage and measure area-under-the-I-V curve. Sometimes there's a specified V when fresh, and V when dead (alkaline, typically 1.5V fresh, 1.0V dead; lithium, typically 3.6V fresh, 3.0V dead).
Reply by ehsjr September 21, 20192019-09-21
On 9/20/2019 6:14 PM, AK wrote:
> I want to calculate approx run time of a D cell with a capacity of 13,000 Mah. > > I assume that Time(H) = Capacity(Ah)/Current(A) equals a final battery voltage of 0 volts which will not work in my case. > > I need a calculation for an ending voltage of around 2.0 volts. > (At 2.0 volts, my clock starts losing time.) > > Thanks >
I assume you have two D cells in series, since you specify an ending voltage of 2 volts. A single D cell provides 1.5 volts. Generally speaking the mAh discharge voltage for a single D cell would be around 1 volt, not 0 volts, but that doesn't matter too much. Read on. The equation will give you ONLY an approximation. The rate at which a battery discharges varies with the amount of current drawn. Unless the load is designed to draw constant current, the denominator (Current) in your equation is a variable so you can't solve it accurately. Add to that the fact that the discharge rate is not linear even at constant current, and you can see the difficulty with getting a precise and accurate answer. Look at some battery discharge curves to get a feeling for this. Ed