Reply by John Larkin November 22, 20112011-11-22
On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 03:12:45 -0600, "maxascent"
<jbean@n_o_s_p_a_m.n_o_s_p_a_m.beandigital.co.uk> wrote:

>I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) signal to >200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to be at least 500 kHz. >Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an opamp that is capable of this? > >TIA > >Jon > >--------------------------------------- >Posted through http://www.Electronics-Related.com
I like this one ftp://jjlarkin.lmi.net/HVamp.JPG but it's too slow for you. John
Reply by Jamie November 22, 20112011-11-22
maxascent wrote:

> I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) signal to > 200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to be at least 500 kHz. > Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an opamp that is capable of this? > > TIA > > Jon > > --------------------------------------- > Posted through http://www.Electronics-Related.com
Are you looking for a a unit that swings below into the - output or just 0..200V? Are you sure you don't mean PEAK?, your voltage specs are a little sketchy. Is it a signal amp you want like this? http://www.taborelec.com/products_home.asp?prod=prod_wideband&model=9400&over=products Jamie
Reply by Fred Bloggs November 22, 20112011-11-22
On Nov 22, 5:04=A0am, Alexander <inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
> Am 22.11.2011 10:12, schrieb maxascent: > > > I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) signal t=
o
> > 200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to be at least 500 kHz=
.
> > Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an opamp that is capable of this=
?
> > have a look at AN18 from Linear Technology, fig. 9. The circuit shown is > designed for +/-120V output swing but it can easily be modified for > unipolar operation. > > Alexander
Interesting 12-Bit Charge Balance A/D Converter in the LT1055 datasheet...now what to do with ratios of clock outputs...
Reply by Nico Coesel November 22, 20112011-11-22
"maxascent" <jbean@n_o_s_p_a_m.n_o_s_p_a_m.beandigital.co.uk> wrote:

>I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) signal to >200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to be at least 500 kHz. >Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an opamp that is capable of this?
The solution depends greatly on the required output power. -- Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply indicates you are not using the right tools... nico@nctdevpuntnl (punt=.) --------------------------------------------------------------
Reply by Tim Wescott November 22, 20112011-11-22
On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 10:10:18 -0800, George Herold wrote:

> On Nov 22, 12:49&nbsp;pm, Jim Thompson <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-I...@On- > My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >> On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 09:42:40 -0800 (PST), George Herold >> >> >> >> >> >> <gher...@teachspin.com> wrote: >> >On Nov 22, 10:07&nbsp;am, Bill Sloman <bill.slo...@ieee.org> wrote: >> >> On Nov 22, 2:58&nbsp;pm, George Herold <gher...@teachspin.com> wrote: >> >> >> > On Nov 22, 6:31&nbsp;am, mike <spam...@gmail.com> wrote: >> >> >> > > maxascent wrote: >> >> > > > I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) >> >> > > > signal to 200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to >> >> > > > be at least 500 kHz. Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an >> >> > > > opamp that is capable of this? >> >> >> > > > TIA >> >> >> > > > Jon >> >> >> > > > --------------------------------------- Posted >> >> > > > throughhttp://www.Electronics-Related.com >> >> >> > > Isn't it important to specify the load impedance or something >> >> > > similar? AC or DC coupled? >> >> >> > Yeah a nice transformer might do it. >> >> >> 500kHz of bandwidth is asking a bit much of the nicest transformer >> >> with a 40:1 ratio. >> >> >OK sure, but one could get 25 Vp-p from an opamp and then move on from >> >there... >> >> >(or maybe even 50 Vp-p if you ran it differential and got 'creative' >> >with the power supplies.) >> >> >But my guess is the OP wants DC to 500kHz. &nbsp;(We'll probably never >> >know.) >> >> >George H. >> >> >> Transmission line transformers do offer that kind of bandwidth, but >> >> you are restricted by the characteristic impedances of practicable >> >> transmission lines. >> >> >> I can see getting 2:1 at 25R out of a first stage wound with two >> >> strands of coax, connected in parallell, which could then drive a >> >> second 2:1 stage wound with twisted pair chosen for a 100R >> >> characteristic impedance for a total step-up of 4:1 with an output >> >> impedance of 400R, but that still leaves a factor of ten to go. >> >> >> -- >> >> Bill Sloman, Nijmegen- Hide quoted text - >> >> >> - Show quoted text - >> >> Has the OP specified a load? &nbsp;Is it Dc-500kHz or some minimum low >> corner. > > Nah, we have no idea. The only spec at the moment is 0 to 200V... since > it's single ended one might try an opamp driving a FET. (If the ~$40 > Apex solution is too expensive.)
I think you'd need an opamp driving at least a couple of transistors, unless you didn't mind a really wimpy output, a lot of loss in your amplifying stage, or both. And true 0V output is going to be hard to come by without split supplies. With split supplies you could either use a FET or a sufficiently high voltage NPN and a resistor load to +210V (or some other 200+overhead). Whether you also had a common-collector follower on that to add some oomph would be up to you -- my, that $40 Apex part is starting to look cheap for anything but high volumes, isn't it? -- www.wescottdesign.com
Reply by George Herold November 22, 20112011-11-22
On Nov 22, 12:49=A0pm, Jim Thompson <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-I...@On-
My-Web-Site.com> wrote:
> On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 09:42:40 -0800 (PST), George Herold > > > > > > <gher...@teachspin.com> wrote: > >On Nov 22, 10:07=A0am, Bill Sloman <bill.slo...@ieee.org> wrote: > >> On Nov 22, 2:58=A0pm, George Herold <gher...@teachspin.com> wrote: > > >> > On Nov 22, 6:31=A0am, mike <spam...@gmail.com> wrote: > > >> > > maxascent wrote: > >> > > > I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) s=
ignal to
> >> > > > 200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to be at least =
500 kHz.
> >> > > > Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an opamp that is capable =
of this?
> > >> > > > TIA > > >> > > > Jon > > >> > > > --------------------------------------- > >> > > > Posted throughhttp://www.Electronics-Related.com > > >> > > Isn't it important to specify the load impedance or something simi=
lar?
> >> > > AC or DC coupled? > > >> > Yeah a nice transformer might do it. > > >> 500kHz of bandwidth is asking a bit much of the nicest transformer > >> with a 40:1 ratio. > > >OK sure, but one could get 25 Vp-p from an opamp and then move on from > >there... > > >(or maybe even 50 Vp-p if you ran it differential and got 'creative' > >with the power supplies.) > > >But my guess is the OP wants DC to 500kHz. =A0(We'll probably never > >know.) > > >George H. > > >> Transmission line transformers do offer that kind of bandwidth, but > >> you are restricted by the characteristic impedances of practicable > >> transmission lines. > > >> I can see getting 2:1 at 25R out of a first stage wound with two > >> strands of coax, connected in parallell, which could then drive a > >> second 2:1 stage wound with twisted pair chosen for a 100R > >> characteristic impedance for a total step-up of 4:1 with an output > >> impedance of 400R, but that still leaves a factor of ten to go. > > >> -- > >> Bill Sloman, Nijmegen- Hide quoted text - > > >> - Show quoted text - > > Has the OP specified a load? =A0Is it Dc-500kHz or some minimum low > corner.
Nah, we have no idea. The only spec at the moment is 0 to 200V... since it's single ended one might try an opamp driving a FET. (If the ~$40 Apex solution is too expensive.) George H.
> > =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =
=A0 =A0 ...Jim Thompson
> -- > | James E.Thompson, CTO =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =
=A0 =A0| =A0 =A0mens =A0 =A0 |
> | Analog Innovations, Inc. =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =
=A0 | =A0 =A0 et =A0 =A0 =A0|
> | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems =A0| =A0 =A0manus =A0 =
=A0|
> | Phoenix, Arizona =A085048 =A0 =A0Skype: Contacts Only =A0| =A0 =A0 =A0 =
=A0 =A0 =A0 |
> | Voice:(480)460-2350 =A0Fax: Available upon request | =A0Brass Rat =A0| > | E-mail Icon athttp://www.analog-innovations.com| =A0 =A01962 =A0 =A0 | > > I love to cook with wine. =A0 =A0 Sometimes I even put it in the food.- H=
ide quoted text -
> > - Show quoted text -
Reply by Tim Wescott November 22, 20112011-11-22
On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 07:07:37 -0800, Bill Sloman wrote:

> On Nov 22, 2:58&nbsp;pm, George Herold <gher...@teachspin.com> wrote: >> On Nov 22, 6:31&nbsp;am, mike <spam...@gmail.com> wrote: >> >> > maxascent wrote: >> > > I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) >> > > signal to 200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to be at >> > > least 500 kHz. Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an opamp that >> > > is capable of this? >> >> > > TIA >> >> > > Jon >> >> > > --------------------------------------- Posted >> > > throughhttp://www.Electronics-Related.com >> >> > Isn't it important to specify the load impedance or something >> > similar? AC or DC coupled? >> >> Yeah a nice transformer might do it. > > 500kHz of bandwidth is asking a bit much of the nicest transformer with > a 40:1 ratio.
Put yourself into malicious compliance mode, and 500kHz of bandwidth is easy. Just specify a center frequency of 10MHz, and use a 10:1 ratio transformer in a resonant circuit with a loaded Q of four or five! -- www.wescottdesign.com
Reply by Jim Thompson November 22, 20112011-11-22
On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 09:42:40 -0800 (PST), George Herold
<gherold@teachspin.com> wrote:

>On Nov 22, 10:07&#2013266080;am, Bill Sloman <bill.slo...@ieee.org> wrote: >> On Nov 22, 2:58&#2013266080;pm, George Herold <gher...@teachspin.com> wrote: >> >> >> >> >> >> > On Nov 22, 6:31&#2013266080;am, mike <spam...@gmail.com> wrote: >> >> > > maxascent wrote: >> > > > I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) signal to >> > > > 200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to be at least 500 kHz. >> > > > Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an opamp that is capable of this? >> >> > > > TIA >> >> > > > Jon >> >> > > > --------------------------------------- >> > > > Posted throughhttp://www.Electronics-Related.com >> >> > > Isn't it important to specify the load impedance or something similar? >> > > AC or DC coupled? >> >> > Yeah a nice transformer might do it. >> >> 500kHz of bandwidth is asking a bit much of the nicest transformer >> with a 40:1 ratio. > >OK sure, but one could get 25 Vp-p from an opamp and then move on from >there... > >(or maybe even 50 Vp-p if you ran it differential and got 'creative' >with the power supplies.) > >But my guess is the OP wants DC to 500kHz. (We'll probably never >know.) > >George H. >> >> Transmission line transformers do offer that kind of bandwidth, but >> you are restricted by the characteristic impedances of practicable >> transmission lines. >> >> I can see getting 2:1 at 25R out of a first stage wound with two >> strands of coax, connected in parallell, which could then drive a >> second 2:1 stage wound with twisted pair chosen for a 100R >> characteristic impedance for a total step-up of 4:1 with an output >> impedance of 400R, but that still leaves a factor of ten to go. >> >> -- >> Bill Sloman, Nijmegen- Hide quoted text - >> >> - Show quoted text -
Has the OP specified a load? Is it Dc-500kHz or some minimum low corner. ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson, CTO | mens | | Analog Innovations, Inc. | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | Phoenix, Arizona 85048 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
Reply by George Herold November 22, 20112011-11-22
On Nov 22, 10:07=A0am, Bill Sloman <bill.slo...@ieee.org> wrote:
> On Nov 22, 2:58=A0pm, George Herold <gher...@teachspin.com> wrote: > > > > > > > On Nov 22, 6:31=A0am, mike <spam...@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > maxascent wrote: > > > > I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) sign=
al to
> > > > 200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to be at least 500=
kHz.
> > > > Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an opamp that is capable of =
this?
> > > > > TIA > > > > > Jon > > > > > --------------------------------------- > > > > Posted throughhttp://www.Electronics-Related.com > > > > Isn't it important to specify the load impedance or something similar=
?
> > > AC or DC coupled? > > > Yeah a nice transformer might do it. > > 500kHz of bandwidth is asking a bit much of the nicest transformer > with a 40:1 ratio.
OK sure, but one could get 25 Vp-p from an opamp and then move on from there... (or maybe even 50 Vp-p if you ran it differential and got 'creative' with the power supplies.) But my guess is the OP wants DC to 500kHz. (We'll probably never know.) George H.
> > Transmission line transformers do offer that kind of bandwidth, but > you are restricted by the characteristic impedances of practicable > transmission lines. > > I can see getting 2:1 at 25R out of a first stage wound with two > strands of coax, connected in parallell, which could then drive a > second 2:1 stage wound with twisted pair chosen for a 100R > characteristic impedance for a total step-up of 4:1 with an output > impedance of 400R, but that still leaves a factor of ten to go. > > -- > Bill Sloman, Nijmegen- Hide quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
Reply by Tim Wescott November 22, 20112011-11-22
On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 05:57:57 -0800, George Herold wrote:

> On Nov 22, 4:57&nbsp;am, John Walliker <jrwalli...@gmail.com> wrote: >> On Nov 22, 9:12&nbsp;am, >> "maxascent"<jbean@n_o_s_p_a_m.n_o_s_p_a_m.beandigital.co.uk> wrote: >> > I need an amplifier that can amplify a 5V p-p (range 5V to 0V) signal >> > to 200V p-p (range 200V to 0V). The bandwidth needs to be at least >> > 500 kHz. Does anyone know of a circuit or maybe an opamp that is >> > capable of this? >> >> Have a look at: >> >> http://www.cirrus.com/en/products/apex/index.html >> >> John > > Oh, did cirrus buy up apex?
Yes, several years ago. I was trying to remember who bought Apex (I was thinking Cypris) when I saw John's post. There needs to be a website -- www.whoboughtwhom.com -- to keep track of things like Apex and Cirrus, and Motorola Semiconductor Division and FreeFall Semiconductor, and Bell Aerospace and Bell/Textron, etc. You could probably make money at it, if you could figure out an easy indexing scheme, and sell ads. -- www.wescottdesign.com