Reply by Cursitor Doom January 28, 20182018-01-28
On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 10:56:41 -0500, Ralph Mowery wrote:

> And England english is sometimes different than American english. Some > words that mean the same are not even spelled the same.
That was certainly the case before Samuel Johnson published his ground- breaking dictionary - but you're really talking about the state of the language prior to its publication in 1775. -- This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.
Reply by Cursitor Doom January 28, 20182018-01-28
On Sat, 27 Jan 2018 03:18:06 +0000, Jasen Betts wrote:

> On 2018-01-26, Cursitor Doom <curd@notformail.com> wrote: >> On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 06:46:19 -0800, John Larkin wrote: >> >>> English is a wonderful language. We have about 300,000 words, and each >>> has many meanings. >> >> But none with as many meanings as the German word 'zug' AFAIK. > > Collins german-english dictionary lists only 10 meanings, > > English "set" has thirty-something meanings and there are words with > more.
There are some exceedingly useful words in this language. Schlag, for example; and Zug. There are three-quarters of a column of Schlags in the dictionary, and a column and a half of Zugs. The word Schlag means Blow, Stroke, Dash, Hit, Shock, Clap, Slap, Time, Bar, Coin, Stamp, Kind, Sort, Manner, Way, Apoplexy, Wood-cutting, Enclosure, Field, Forest-clearing. This is its simple and exact meaning -- that is to say, its restricted, its fettered meaning; but there are ways by which you can set it free, so that it can soar away, as on the wings of the morning, and never be at rest. You can hang any word you please to its tail, and make it mean anything you want to. You can begin with Schlag-ader, which means artery, and you can hang on the whole dictionary, word by word, clear through the alphabet to Schlag-wasser, which means bilge-water -- and including Schlag-mutter, which means mother-in-law. Just the same with Zug. Strictly speaking, Zug means Pull, Tug, Draught, Procession, March, Progress, Flight, Direction, Expedition, Train, Caravan, Passage, Stroke, Touch, Line, Flourish, Trait of Character, Feature, Lineament, Chess-move, Organ-stop, Team, Whiff, Bias, Drawer, Propensity, Inhalation, Disposition: but that thing which it does not mean -- when all its legitimate pennants have been hung on, has not been discovered yet. "One cannot overestimate the usefulness of Schlag and Zug. Armed just with these two, and the word also, what cannot the foreigner on German soil accomplish? The German word also is the equivalent of the English phrase "You know," and does not mean anything at all -- in talk, though it sometimes does in print. Every time a German opens his mouth an also falls out; and every time he shuts it he bites one in two that was trying to get out. "Now, the foreigner, equipped with these three noble words, is master of the situation. Let him talk right along, fearlessly; let him pour his indifferent German forth, and when he lacks for a word, let him heave a Schlag into the vacuum; all the chances are that it fits it like a plug, but if it doesn't let him promptly heave a Zug after it; the two together can hardly fail to bung the hole; but if, by a miracle, they should fail, let him simply say also! and this will give him a moment's chance to think of the needful word. In Germany, when you load your conversational gun it is always best to throw in a Schlag or two and a Zug or two, because it doesn't make any difference how much the rest of the charge may scatter, you are bound to bag something with them. Then you blandly say also, and load up again. Nothing gives such an air of grace and elegance and unconstraint to a German or an English conversation as to scatter it full of "Also's" or "You knows."" From Mark Twain's essay, The Awful German Language: https://www.cs.utah.edu/~gback/awfgrmlg.html -- This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.
Reply by M Philbrook January 28, 20182018-01-28
In article <MPG.34d3c846912bfbbe9896f0@news.east.earthlink.net>, 
rmowery28146@earthlink.net says...
> > In article <farj6d5hta18bqsnsbq6956hf32b45j5vv@4ax.com>, > jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com says... > > > > > > > > >The tips I was referring was the helpful kind, not the soldering ones :-) > > > > > >Andy > > > > English is a wonderful language. We have about 300,000 words, and each > > has many meanings. > > And England english is sometimes different than American english. Some > words that mean the same are not even spelled the same.
Whats the matter fer you, they all spelt the same! ;)
Reply by January 27, 20182018-01-27
On 27 Jan 2018 03:18:06 GMT, Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote:

>On 2018-01-26, Cursitor Doom <curd@notformail.com> wrote: >> On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 06:46:19 -0800, John Larkin wrote: >> >>> English is a wonderful language. We have about 300,000 words, and each >>> has many meanings. >> >> But none with as many meanings as the German word 'zug' AFAIK. > >Collins german-english dictionary lists only 10 meanings, > >English "set" has thirty-something meanings and there are words with more.
What about the word "fuck"? It is used in so manydifferent ways. Such as: "Fuck You You Fuckin' Fuck!". I can think of many ways that sentence could be read. Eric
Reply by George Herold January 27, 20182018-01-27
On Friday, January 26, 2018 at 2:42:23 PM UTC-5, Cursitor Doom wrote:
> On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 07:02:10 -0800, George Herold wrote: > > > For sucking solder out of through holes I love my DP-100 desoldering > > pump. I'm not any good at using solder wick. > > They can be too aggressive on some boards, though. It's not nice when you > find a half inch of trace hanging out the end of your pump. :(
Right, not for surface mount. George H.
> > > > > > -- > This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via > the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other > protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of > GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet > protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.
Reply by Jasen Betts January 26, 20182018-01-26
On 2018-01-27, Chris <cbx@noreply.com> wrote:
> On Fri, 26 Jan 2018 14:42:05 -0800, jurb6006 wrote: > >> Best I've found is the Hakko. Little blue thing heats up quick and works >> real nice. > > Do you have the model number or link for the actual specific item on Ebay > or Amazon?
"Little blue thing" is probably a Hakko FX-888, (also available in grey) -- This email has not been checked by half-arsed antivirus software
Reply by Jasen Betts January 26, 20182018-01-26
On 2018-01-26, Cursitor Doom <curd@notformail.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 06:46:19 -0800, John Larkin wrote: > >> English is a wonderful language. We have about 300,000 words, and each >> has many meanings. > > But none with as many meanings as the German word 'zug' AFAIK.
Collins german-english dictionary lists only 10 meanings, English "set" has thirty-something meanings and there are words with more. -- This email has not been checked by half-arsed antivirus software
Reply by Chris January 26, 20182018-01-26
On Fri, 26 Jan 2018 14:42:05 -0800, jurb6006 wrote:

> Best I've found is the Hakko. Little blue thing heats up quick and works > real nice.
Do you have the model number or link for the actual specific item on Ebay or Amazon?
Reply by January 26, 20182018-01-26
Best I've found is the Hakko. Little blue thing heats up quick and works real nice. 

If you want hot air I don't know. 
Reply by Cursitor Doom January 26, 20182018-01-26
On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 07:02:10 -0800, George Herold wrote:

> For sucking solder out of through holes I love my DP-100 desoldering > pump. I'm not any good at using solder wick.
They can be too aggressive on some boards, though. It's not nice when you find a half inch of trace hanging out the end of your pump. :( -- This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.