Reply by Fred Abse November 6, 20132013-11-06
On Wed, 06 Nov 2013 01:05:32 -0800, riccardo manfrin wrote:

> The closest to this was Fred's answer but the source is not exactly an > "handbook".
Depends how big your hands are... My hardback copy is only about 2.5 inches thick ;-) -- "Design is the reverse of analysis" (R.D. Middlebrook)
Reply by Helmut Wabnig November 6, 20132013-11-06
On Thu, 7 Nov 2013 07:02:44 +1100, "Phil Allison" <phil_a@tpg.com.au>
wrote:

> >"Helmut Wabnig" > >** Fuck off retard. > >
I bet your antenna radiates into the ground. w.
Reply by Phil Allison November 6, 20132013-11-06
"Helmut Wabnig"

** Fuck off retard.




Reply by John Fields November 6, 20132013-11-06
On Wed, 06 Nov 2013 11:44:50 +0100, Helmut Wabnig <hwabnig@.- ---
-.dotat> wrote:

>On Wed, 6 Nov 2013 21:17:30 +1100, "Phil Allison" <phil_a@tpg.com.au> >wrote: > >> >>"riccardo manfrin" >>> >>> I'm now starting from scratch to understand the current >>> and voltages distribution across the dipole to understand >>> how the ratio between them is defined and therefore >>> the impedance. >>> >> >>** You are so far off the basic issue. >> >>An antenna radiates RF energy in proportion to the VOLTAGE on its driven >>elements. >> >>A series inductor operating at resonance with some capacitance *magnifies* >>the voltage appearing at the output of the driving amplifier. >> >>Soooo - it boosts the energy radiation if the antenna is capacitive. >> >>Which all short antennas are !!!!!!!!!!! >> >>Fuck equal value impedance matching nonsense. >> >> >I always thougt it is the moving electron which radiates. >When you charge a metal object to a million volts, >will it radiate?
--- Only while it's charging/discharging. JF
Reply by Helmut Wabnig November 6, 20132013-11-06
On Wed, 6 Nov 2013 21:17:30 +1100, "Phil Allison" <phil_a@tpg.com.au>
wrote:

> >"riccardo manfrin" >> >> I'm now starting from scratch to understand the current >> and voltages distribution across the dipole to understand >> how the ratio between them is defined and therefore >> the impedance. >> > >** You are so far off the basic issue. > >An antenna radiates RF energy in proportion to the VOLTAGE on its driven >elements. > >A series inductor operating at resonance with some capacitance *magnifies* >the voltage appearing at the output of the driving amplifier. > >Soooo - it boosts the energy radiation if the antenna is capacitive. > >Which all short antennas are !!!!!!!!!!! > >Fuck equal value impedance matching nonsense. > >
I always thougt it is the moving electron which radiates. When you charge a metal object to a million volts, will it radiate? w.
Reply by Phil Allison November 6, 20132013-11-06
"riccardo manfrin"
> > I'm now starting from scratch to understand the current > and voltages distribution across the dipole to understand > how the ratio between them is defined and therefore > the impedance. >
** You are so far off the basic issue. An antenna radiates RF energy in proportion to the VOLTAGE on its driven elements. A series inductor operating at resonance with some capacitance *magnifies* the voltage appearing at the output of the driving amplifier. Soooo - it boosts the energy radiation if the antenna is capacitive. Which all short antennas are !!!!!!!!!!! Fuck equal value impedance matching nonsense. ... Phil
Reply by riccardo manfrin November 6, 20132013-11-06
> Read "Resonant Antennas" at: > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antenna_(radio) > for a nice explanation.
It is interesting, but I'm looking for a (possibly simple) mathematical formulation that - applies to a generic dipole of arbitrary length (not lambda /2 or lambda/4, and in general way smaller than the wavelength), - does not take in integrals nor starts from Maxwell's equations - possibly takes in all conventional approximations/simplifications for far field, isotropic, linear, homogeneous, non-dispersive medium, - binds the antenna complex impedance to the length and lambda The closest to this was Fred's answer but the source is not exactly an "handbook". I'm now starting from scratch to understand the current and voltages distribution across the dipole to understand how the ratio between them is defined and therefore the impedance. R
Reply by riccardo manfrin November 6, 20132013-11-06
> > Radiotron Designer's Handbook, Chapter 22, Section iii gives:
On my way to download that.
Reply by John Fields November 4, 20132013-11-04
On Mon, 4 Nov 2013 01:01:49 -0800 (PST), riccardo manfrin
<riccardomanfrin@gmail.com> wrote:


>I've been reading about the loading coil, but I just can't figure out the purpose? I thought that the inductor was there to match the antenna load. Has the "loading coil" this purpose? I mean, is it just another name for impedance matching? Or does it serve different purposes?
--- Read "Resonant Antennas" at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antenna_(radio) for a nice explanation.
Reply by Phil Allison November 4, 20132013-11-04
"riccardo manfrin" = Goggle Groups fuckwit
> > > I've been reading about the loading coil,
** No fooling ??
> but I just can't figure out the purpose?
** How surprising...........
> I thought that the inductor was there to match the antenna load.
** It might be there match your stupid ass.
> Has the "loading coil" this purpose?
** Fuck knows that this retard thinks "match " actually means Least of all him.
> I mean, is it just another name for impedance matching?
** Not exactly, actually
> Or does it serve different purposes?
** Hmmm, is there a tiny flicker of insight .......... It might just dawn on this fucking idiot that "match" has more than its literal meaning. Like in the old joke: " Got a match ? " " Yeah - your face and my ass. " ... Phil